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post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-02-2012, 06:59 AM
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Saddle Soap works well also.

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post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-02-2012, 08:15 AM
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Pure Neatsfoot oil works well for conditioning the leather as well.

http://www.tandyleatherfactory.com/e...21997-119.aspx

http://www.horseloverz.com/Leather-C...sfoot-Oil.html

Last edited by BBob; 12-02-2012 at 08:21 AM.
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post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-02-2012, 09:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by basshawk84 View Post
Saddle Soap works well also.
Saddle soap is a great cleaner, but leather needs to be treated with something after it is cleaned..... I prefer treatments that have Lanolin in them. I have a a couple of products that I prefer..... One is from Connely, (sp) that is the leather providers for Rolls Royce, Bentley, Jaguar, etc. Very fine product, albeit expensive.

As I previously mentioned, Lexol. Easy to find, relatively inexpensive and a very good, proven product. They also have a leather cleaner that is very good.

Dad used to use Neetsfoot oil years ago, decent product. Until better stuff came along. Not saying it is bad..... Just saying there are better products available........ sorta like Victory over HD.

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Last edited by SteveYacht; 12-02-2012 at 09:26 AM. Reason: additional info
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post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-02-2012, 09:33 AM
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I too have been using Lexol for years. Good products that work as advertised. I was merely pointing out another option for replacing the oils that naturally evaporate out of leather that need to be replaced so cracking and drying of the leather doesn't happen sooner than it absolutely needs to. Some folks prefer the old ways because they too work and that's what they are used to.

For deer skin gloves you can just wash them is warm soapy water to remove any products and dirt from them. Let dry and apply whatever product you like to use to keep the leather supple.

I hadn't heard that mink oil is hard on the threads. That info is new to me. I'm also surprised they used cotton thread on leather. Everyone knows to use nylon thread for longer lasting and more durable stitching.

Last edited by BBob; 12-02-2012 at 09:36 AM.
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post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-02-2012, 10:15 AM
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Bob, you are absolutely correct..... One, neetsfoot oil is a great product, Dad used it for years.... matter of fact, Tandy was his favorite suppliers. Only issue with Neetsfoot oil is that it will darken some leathers upon application. This is not desireable to some.

Yea, those OLD deerskin gloves surprised me also. Must have been very old to have cotton thread. I found them at a consignment shop in either Vermont or Upstate NY back in the late 80's. Still had hang tag on them from a glove factory in Troy, NY..... close to Gloversville.... called it that for a reason! Must have been older than I thought..... No velcro, only high quality snaps...... Seams outside, great fit and soft as butter. Should have had some idea though, since those old Glove factories have been gone for a very long time.


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post #16 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-03-2012, 01:29 PM
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Where does a person get Lexol?

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post #17 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-03-2012, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by 4 inch pistons View Post
Where does a person get Lexol?
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=lexol



Steve; I think Neatsfoot oil is used more in the saddlery business, especially where lots of saddles are kept and used, because they not only have they just been doing it that way for 100 years but also because it's less expensive and available in bulk sizes.

You are also correct in that it will darken light colored leather and sometimes that is what the person wants but for black leather; it should be no problem at all. Lexol has certainly proved itself to me over the years I've been using it. can't say for sure what product is best but I think we can agree that either product will do the job.

The best time to apply the conditioner is during the Summer when we can put the leathers out in a garage or shed to warm up a bit; say to 90+ degrees. Then apply the conditioner when the leather is warm because, like you said, the leather has pores so this opens the pores so the conditioner can soak in better. Another alternative is to put the leathers in the oven on the lowest setting to warm them up.

One thing a lot of people do wrong with any type of leather conditioner is to apply too much at one time. It really needs to be applied in light coats until the person determines the leather has absorbed about as much as it needs.

Some good info on Lexol:

Lexol Leather Conditioner

Information

Lexol Conditioner is a liquid conditioner and preservative intended for use in the care and conservation of leather. It works to preserve and maintain the strength, beauty and flexibility of leather -- old and new -- and to help restore resiliency to old or neglected leather that has become hardened and stiff.
Product Characteristics:
  • Lexol Conditioner is an emulsion much like those used in leather tanning so it puts back the essential oils to nourish and protect leather.
  • It is concentrated, so it cleans effectively with a considerably smaller quantity of product.
  • The modified oils in Lexol Conditioner are retained in the area of application to protect against migration, or seepage, into adjacent materials or surfaces.
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post #18 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-03-2012, 04:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4 inch pistons View Post
Where does a person get Lexol?
Most auto supply stores have lexol...... Walmart in my area also has it. Pretty easy to come by

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post #19 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-03-2012, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBob View Post
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=lexol



Steve; I think Neatsfoot oil is used more in the saddlery business, especially where lots of saddles are kept and used, because they not only have they just been doing it that way for 100 years but also because it's less expensive and available in bulk sizes.

You are also correct in that it will darken light colored leather and sometimes that is what the person wants but for black leather; it should be no problem at all. Lexol has certainly proved itself to me over the years I've been using it. can't say for sure what product is best but I think we can agree that either product will do the job.

The best time to apply the conditioner is during the Summer when we can put the leathers out in a garage or shed to warm up a bit; say to 90+ degrees. Then apply the conditioner when the leather is warm because, like you said, the leather has pores so this opens the pores so the conditioner can soak in better. Another alternative is to put the leathers in the oven on the lowest setting to warm them up.

One thing a lot of people do wrong with any type of leather conditioner is to apply too much at one time. It really needs to be applied in light coats until the person determines the leather has absorbed about as much as it needs.

Some good info on Lexol:

Lexol Leather Conditioner

Information

Lexol Conditioner is a liquid conditioner and preservative intended for use in the care and conservation of leather. It works to preserve and maintain the strength, beauty and flexibility of leather -- old and new -- and to help restore resiliency to old or neglected leather that has become hardened and stiff.
Product Characteristics:
  • Lexol Conditioner is an emulsion much like those used in leather tanning so it puts back the essential oils to nourish and protect leather.
  • It is concentrated, so it cleans effectively with a considerably smaller quantity of product.
  • The modified oils in Lexol Conditioner are retained in the area of application to protect against migration, or seepage, into adjacent materials or surfaces.

Excellent information, Bob

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