Girlfriend put it in the ditch today. [Archive] - Victory Forums - Victory Motorcycle Forum

: Girlfriend put it in the ditch today.


Dropy
07-02-2010, 03:24 PM
Well, i got my new bike so girlfriend upgraded to my old Vstar 650. We went for a ride to medora, 35 miles away and was on 2 lane back road. Girl wanted to follow me so i let her, though i prefer her in the front as she is new rider. She put the bike into a ditch at 55. She is fine, bike has minor cosmetic issues now that r easily fixxed.

Apparantly the vibration in the handlebars is making her hands numb. So she said she could not turn the bike in the curve. She tried to ride it out to a stop but the bike went down at a slower speed and she rolled off in the high soft grass. She has a knot on her leg above the knee and a skinned elbow from the grass.

Is there some something we can do/install on her or the bike to help the numbing?

Hope this is ok to post here, i am just looking for help to make her riding more enjoyable and SAFE!

diamondrmp
07-02-2010, 04:50 PM
Sorry to hear about the mishap but glad to hear your girl is ok.

There are a lot of different ideas with numbness. I went with the ISO grips from Kuryakan. They work for me

NOEMTZ
07-02-2010, 06:30 PM
Glad she is OKAY! Check the front tire and it's balance. If its off balance...that could cause vibration. Dyna Beads may help.

If the tire is not wearing evenly...another cause.

And if all else is good, try some grips with a bit of rubber on them like Diamond mentioned.

Dropy
07-02-2010, 07:22 PM
Ok, i will look into all these. thanx folks.

Bzippi
07-02-2010, 09:23 PM
Did you notice a lot of vibration when you were riding it? If so, you may also want to try synching the carbs. My old V-Star gets a lot of vibration around that speed when the carbs are out of synch.

Glad to hear your GF is OK. thumb up

NHXC
07-04-2010, 06:44 PM
Maybe have her wear gloves with gel in the palm.

Dropy
07-05-2010, 11:01 AM
I am thinking i will put the bike in the shop to get the carbs sunc'd, front wheel balanced, get her gel palm gloves, maybe new grips, have the bike looked over 100% and lastly... get her some riding experience!!!!! She has less than 100 miles on a bike in her lifetime.

Udawg
07-12-2010, 08:20 PM
I am thinking i will put the bike in the shop to get the carbs sunc'd, front wheel balanced, get her gel palm gloves, maybe new grips, have the bike looked over 100% and lastly... get her some riding experience!!!!! She has less than 100 miles on a bike in her lifetime.

If she's a newbie, the problem is probably just squeezing the grips too hard. As she rides, she will become more comfortable on the bike and will relax her grip and find it much more comfortable.

LarryM
07-13-2010, 09:05 AM
Your post brings up a question in my mind. You said she tried to "turn" the bike in the curve. Has your girlfriend taken a basic rider course as offered by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (http://www.msf-usa.org/)? Given her obvious lack of experience, this course could actually save her life! (BTW, it's mandatory in many states...how 'bout yours?) OPINION: Too many people ignore basic rider training a put themselves and others at risk, too often.

One of the very first things you learn there is motorcycle control techniques and that includes "pushing" the handlebars in the direction you want the bike to go. (This is an edit after some discussion: MSF's Basic Rider Course (BRC) teaches you to apply light forward pressure on the grips of the handlebars in the direction you want the bike to travel. This works best at speed of course. Try it if you don't do it already, just simply push LIGHTLY on the right handgrip and the bike will go right, left to go left.) Trying to "turn" i.e. "steer", the bike is the exact OPPOSITE of what she needed to do, especially in a critical situation like she was experiencing.

So, numb hands or no, it seems that a little bit of training could have avoided this situation. I urge you to help her live long. Get her the training she needs, man.

diamondrmp
07-13-2010, 09:25 AM
Your post brings up a question in my mind. You said she tried to "turn" the bike in the curve. Has your girlfriend taken a basic rider course as offered by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (http://www.msf-usa.org/)? Given her obvious lack of experience, this course could actually save her life! (BTW, it's mandatory in many states...how 'bout yours?) OPINION: Too many people ignore basic rider training a put themselves and others at risk, too often.

One of the very first things you learn there is motorcycle control techniques and that includes "pushing" the handlebars in the direction you want the bike to go. Trying to "steer" the bike is the exact OPPOSITE of what she needed to do, especially in a critical situation like she was experiencing.

So, numb hands or no, it seems that a little bit of training could have avoided this situation. I urge you to help her live long. Get her the training she needs, man.

Not sure if you are talking about counter steering but that statement is incorrect. You COUNTER steer which means you actually push in the OPPOSITE direction the bike is turning/leaning. If you are going right then you push the bars LEFT.

I 100% agree with Larry that if she has not she should take the MSF class.

The application of counter steer has saved me from two accidents when I was just starting out. One with a cement barrier on the highway and the other with the side of a mountain!!

The other thing is maybe since you were leading this time you were going at a pace that was out of her comfort zone. Let her lead and allow her the time to get comfortable.

LarryM
07-13-2010, 10:01 AM
You are correct, dr, it sounded right in my head, but my fingers didn't convey that message.

I'll edit my post.

Larry

diamondrmp
07-13-2010, 10:13 AM
You are correct, dr, it sounded right in my head, but my fingers didn't convey that message.

I'll edit my post.

Larry


LMAO!!:ltr::ltr: If you look at most of my post you will almost always see that I edited it for the same reason you just gave. Even when I proof before posting it seems right. Then I read it after I post it and think to myself, :ltr::ltr: WTF?????

Dropy
07-13-2010, 10:36 AM
Ok..yes she has taken the basic riders course thru our local ABATE, which we both also joined. After 10 of questioning her and looking into the issue i am sure it was simply an issue of her hands going numb which caused her to have a mental fart and simply NOT follow the curve. It was NOT a steep curve at all.

Also, since ABATE came to town yesterday and set up there course in our high school parking lot...... She and i took the bikes to dinner, stopped at said parking lot and i led her thru the turns they had setup (nobody was there, it was an empty lot). And i reminded her to LOOK TO WHERE SHE WANTED TO GO, not look at her bikes wheel. Which she admitted was a big issue for her. Once she started looking ahead at where she wanted to go her cornering got very nice.

She forgot her basics because she has MAYBE 50 miles of experience on a bike now. She just needs me get her out more, take it easy, and remind her of her basics till she can grasp it fully on her own.

Lets remeber, she is no biker. She is a school teacher of 25 years now who is just getting into riding. She is smart in some areas, but some areas ( like riding ) she lags behind the curve. She will pick it up, she just needs to remeber her basics and build her confidence. She rides well when she applies herself in these ways.

diamondrmp
07-13-2010, 11:13 AM
I started riding 4 years ago when I took the MSF course. I had only about 1 hour of riding time before that.

I would suggest taking her to that said place and have her practice there OFTEN. I am lucky that the college where I took the course is literally about 50 yards from me. I was there every chance I got practicing.

Dropy I'm not saying you are doing this but maybe you are unconsciously pushing her too fast. When you said you were leading this time you might have been outside of her comfort zone and instead of saying something she wanted you to be proud of her and tried to keep up.


Everyone has a learning curve some longer than others. I have a bud who's wife has been riding over a year. She JUST got comfortable on turns and curves. You could always see her hesitate and jumpy through turns. Now she is smooth and confident. Thats almost 2 years of riding. One things for sure. She knows how to lead a group. We always put her out front so she was comfortable.

Dropy
07-13-2010, 11:34 AM
I agree that our speed was not in her confort zone. We were on a 65 MPH road and doing about 60. I didnt like being in front but she insisted. After the crash she finally listened to me and she now leads. She is getting more confortable and she going faster, 55-60 ish on long straights and thru shallow curves.

The only course here is ABATE. I am sure she needs time in the saddle so as to solidify her knowledge and build her confidence. She knows how to take corners and curves. She has never been a confident person in anything she does. In a year or so i am sure she will be fine.

Dropy
07-13-2010, 11:38 AM
And i just checked ABATE of ND does the MSF course in our state, so she has been thru the course. We took it together about 5 weeks ago ish..

VancouverVictory
07-13-2010, 02:39 PM
I can't stress how important taking a safety course is (even for experienced riders).

They'll provide the necessary instruction for balanced slow speed handling and push steering for higher speed handling.

I am an experience rider however until I learned how to "slow drag" and emergency brake, I never knew how to ride effectively.

Combine that with good habits (shoulder checks etc.) and the investment will prove to be a life saver!

LarryM
07-14-2010, 12:36 PM
AMEN TO THAT!

I rode thousands of miles as a kid, had motorcycles from age 13 to 21, but it was in the 60's and I didn't get a bike again until 4 years ago at AGE 60! I was amazed at how much I'd forgotten...or never knew. (Nobody ever heard of a motorcycle rider safety course back then, you just got on and rode. HA)

Minnesota STRONGLY suggests taking the basic rider course before attempting to get a permanent motorcycle endorsement and requires it for riders under 18. It's the best advice ever. I wish they required it (but they don't) of new riders...of all riders. It could save your life! I also took the Advanced motorcycle safety course which is pretty much a repeat of the basic but this time you ride your own bike...very different from the little 250cc jobs of the basic course. I strongly urge even experienced riders to consider taking the advanced course, as it very positively reinforces good habits and helps point out bad ones in the way we all ride.

And Dropy, I hope you'll forgive my first post regarding her ability, but it seems like you've got the situation well in hand. Help her to master the basics, as it'll greatly enhance here enjoyment of her rides.

Good luck to you both. Ride safely.

LarryM

diamondrmp
07-14-2010, 02:25 PM
Another benefit of the course at least in California is the big discount on insurance. Just to see, I did two quotes with three different insurance companies. One quote without the MSF and one with it. Each company gave me a discount of the least being $175.00 up to $384.00 a year!!!

gary mcclanahan
07-14-2010, 07:54 PM
Glad shes ok, but im just saying, a women belongs in the passenger seat,Not the drivers seat, plain and simple. These bikes produce too much power and a women is not mentally or physically strong enough to handle the driving, just saying.:D

Tarzan
07-14-2010, 08:17 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryM View Post
Your post brings up a question in my mind. You said she tried to "turn" the bike in the curve. Has your girlfriend taken a basic rider course as offered by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (http://www.msf-usa.org/)? Given her obvious lack of experience, this course could actually save her life! (BTW, it's mandatory in many states...how 'bout yours?) OPINION: Too many people ignore basic rider training a put themselves and others at risk, too often.

One of the very first things you learn there is motorcycle control techniques and that includes "pushing" the handlebars in the direction you want the bike to go. Trying to "steer" the bike is the exact OPPOSITE of what she needed to do, especially in a critical situation like she was experiencing.

So, numb hands or no, it seems that a little bit of training could have avoided this situation. I urge you to help her live long. Get her the training she needs, man.
Not sure if you are talking about counter steering but that statement is incorrect. You COUNTER steer which means you actually push in the OPPOSITE direction the bike is turning/leaning. If you are going right then you push the bars LEFT.


Actually the first statement is correct,you push on the left bar to go left and push on the right bar to go right. i used to think the opposite too, and I have ridden a long time.But a friend who took the course told me that and I said no way, till I actually consciously tried it.SO now I push on the bar to go that direction.
Probably always have but never thought about it.

LarryM
07-15-2010, 02:43 PM
Actually the first statement is correct,you push on the left bar to go left and push on the right bar to go right. i used to think the opposite too, and I have ridden a long time.But a friend who took the course told me that and I said no way, till I actually consciously tried it.SO now I push on the bar to go that direction.
Probably always have but never thought about it.

Yes, I now stand by my original post. Thank you for pointing this out. I tried it last night, and I made that change.

So, "pressing" the grip left makes the bike go left, "pressing" right makes the bike go right, at speed anyway. To try to steer a motorcycle is that is, to pull the handlebars right to try to make it turn right is the exact opposite, and likely caused the original problem for the lady.

Counter steering, otoh, is a quite sophisticated maneuver, and takes a lot of speed and technique to execute correctly. Here is the technical details on it from a good answer (in an otherwise not-so-always-good) Wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countersteering .

So, for you riders out there who are not exactly conscious of how steering is properly executed, this might be a good exercise. Here is the BRC manual from the MSF website:
http://msf-usa.org/downloads/Library_Motorcycle_Operator_Manual.pdf where you can learn some of the jargon like SLOW LOOK PRESS and ROLL for handling turns on the bike.

Good stuff...ride safe out there, the competition can kill ya.