Tire Presure [Archive] - Victory Forums - Victory Motorcycle Forum

: Tire Presure


latts
01-13-2011, 06:26 AM
Hi all,

Purchased a 2011 XC in December, and starting to gather info for the up and coming riding season. My question is, what tire presure do you all run on your XC say for single, and two up riding?

thanks for your feedback,
latts

wesdalton
01-13-2011, 06:56 AM
40 psi front and back single or double

gregbenner
01-13-2011, 10:12 AM
Owner's Manual says 36 fr, 38 rear (up to 200 pounds), and 38/40 if fully loaded.

diamondrmp
01-13-2011, 02:38 PM
I would advise following what the owners manual says.

CrossRoads
01-13-2011, 03:18 PM
36 PSI front and 38 PSI rear by the book! I ride single most of the time, and the misses is light enough that I do not change tire pressure when she hops on.

Make sure you check the pressure often. I check it often enough where I never catch the tires more than 2PSI lower than the above figures. This ensures you catch an air leak early, not to mention all the other benefits like safer riding, increased fuel efficiency, longer tire life, etc.

dirtdobber
01-13-2011, 07:52 PM
With the XC/XR being a rather light touring bike I would also go with the manual. Keep a check on tire cupping in the front and wearing in the center on the back. Adjust accordingly.
Check the pressure at least every other day.
So many do not check their pressure as needed and then complain about mileage.
The Dunlap elite III are 1 of the best tires going. I run them on all my bikes

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c53/dirtdobber2/IMG_2719Small.jpg?t=1294970045

Paul M
01-14-2011, 08:21 AM
either check your owners manual or look on the frame member...it is printed out there fro you

BBob
01-14-2011, 12:07 PM
The Dunlap elite III are 1 of the best tires going. I run them on all my bikes


I agree. IMHO the Dunlop E3's are the best motorcycle tire made today for everyday street riding, longevity, handling, and price. I too run them on the last 4 bikes I've had and I was very pleased to see Victory uses them as their stock tires.

I also run car tires on the rear sometimes. I'm going to see how many miles the tire lasts on this bike before making a decision to switch to 40-60k mile CT. It is nice to not have to be concerned with it for so long. Definitely the tire to have if going on a trek to Alaska.

Oh yeah; on the E3's I go by the manual for tire pressure.

CrossRoads
02-10-2011, 01:48 PM
This morning was time for me to check the tire pressure (for my riding habits, every 3rd day does the trick). Did the rear wheel first, and it was at 37 PSI, so added one more to bring it up to 38 PSI. Went to the front, which I usually run at 37 PSI, and as soon as I removed the cap, I could hear the air leaking out. Checked the pressure and it was down to 34 PSI. No big deal, as I will tighten the valve core as soon as I get back home today, but comes to show that you can never check your air pressure too often.

Sure it's rather boring to check it every 2-3 days (I put some 50 miles/day to and from work). But without checking it often, you won't catch a silly, easy to fix leak that might cost you an accident if uncaught for a few more days.

I found out that within 3 days, given my riding time, miles, load, temperature, etc., I should expect my pressure to drop by 0 to 1 PSI. This should be different for everybody, but unless you check often and regularly you will not be able to see the sign of a leak and deal with it on time. Noticing a pressure drop that's out of the ordinary will keep you on your toes and your bike right side up.

RICZ
02-10-2011, 02:06 PM
TIPS TO THE WISE...
1. Use a quality digital tire gauge. Since most read in half pounds, I put a bit more air in than required, then bleed down until the moment the gauge changes to the pressure I want.
2. Use only metal valve stem caps. They have added rubber or silicone seals that can act as a secondary valve in case the strem leaks.

visionjohnny
02-10-2011, 02:06 PM
I check mine once a week every monday. I have found any thing under 40 for the read and cupping sets in and short life out of the tire.
Hot weather and cold weather will change tire pressure DON'T trust the factory gauge go buy a good one at the auto store

dirtdobber
02-10-2011, 06:08 PM
If I ride every day I check every day, If I ride once a week I check once a week.
I am trying out some new caps I found at 1 of the bike supplies centers. They have a green center and what ever pressure you run there is a cap for it in even numbers. I run 38 psi front and rear so I have the caps for 38 psi. When the green center falls even with the cap it's low. How low does it take to show low, not sure yet. They have them for 36/38/40 psi. I have seen them at wallmart but not much to offer for us there.
My Goldwing has a light that comes on when it's 2 lbs low. But you don't know which tire.
On my air compressor I have a certified gauge and I also keep a gauge in each bike.
Maintaining the proper psi will help eliminate tire cupping and extend tire life as well as helping maintain good mpg.

RICZ
02-10-2011, 08:14 PM
I am trying out some new caps I found at 1 of the bike supplies centers. They have a green center and what ever pressure you run there is a cap for it in even numbers.

Those have been known to fail and when they do, you lose all the air in that tire. Best to have a metal cap and check pressures frequently with a quality gauge.

petegtsv10
02-10-2011, 10:39 PM
Both my wife and I have the TireGard monitors on our bikes. All you do is put the transmitter valve caps on and you're ready to read the digital readout. I like knowing my PSI whenever I want. Even if you check it everyday before you ride, you could still lose PSI later in the day. We've all had that odd squirm in our bike at some time where we wondered if it was a low tire. (usually just the road). Reviewers complained about the accuracy of the readings, but my only concern is their consistency. If we see the PSI drop, we pay attention. (it obviously varies with tire temp) As long as my initial fill is checked with a certified guage, the readout tells if there is a loss. This gives us great peace-of-mind.

BBob
02-10-2011, 11:09 PM
This morning was time for me to check the tire pressure (for my riding habits, every 3rd day does the trick). Did the rear wheel first, and it was at 37 PSI, so added one more to bring it up to 38 PSI. Went to the front, which I usually run at 37 PSI, and as soon as I removed the cap, I could hear the air leaking out. Checked the pressure and it was down to 34 PSI. No big deal, as I will tighten the valve core as soon as I get back home today, but comes to show that you can never check your air pressure too often.

Sure it's rather boring to check it every 2-3 days (I put some 50 miles/day to and from work). But without checking it often, you won't catch a silly, easy to fix leak that might cost you an accident if uncaught for a few more days.



I found out that within 3 days, given my riding time, miles, load, temperature, etc., I should expect my pressure to drop by 0 to 1 PSI. This should be different for everybody, but unless you check often and regularly you will not be able to see the sign of a leak and deal with it on time. Noticing a pressure drop that's out of the ordinary will keep you on your toes and your bike right side up.

CR: I wish I knew your name. CR just doesn't really do it.

Anyway; Checking tire pressure dosen't need to be some kind of anal event. Just a simple check a couple times a month will do for most bikes and most people. Your mileage may vary however.

So tell me CR; what time frame is comfortable for you to check the air pressure? Also; do you check the oil, belt, dirt under the belt and many other important things at the same time.

It sounds like you know what you're doing so I want to learn from your experience mate.

BB

petegtsv10
02-11-2011, 09:28 AM
CR: I wish I knew your name. CR just doesn't really do it.

Anyway; Checking tire pressure dosen't need to be some kind of anal event. Just a simple check a couple times a month will do for most bikes and most people. Your mileage may vary however.

So tell me CR; what time frame is comfortable for you to check the air pressure? Also; do you check the oil, belt, dirt under the belt and many other important things at the same time.

It sounds like you know what you're doing so I want to learn from your experience mate.

BB
You simply can't check it too often. If you only check it every 2 weeks and your slow leak is half a PSI per day, you'll be down 7 pounds by the time you know it. The nice thing about the readout on my bars is that you can check the PSI any time you want to glance at it. I don't mean to sound so anal about this, but it has really given me some peace-of-mind knowing my tires (and, my wife's) are perfectly inflated all the time. Honestly, they pay for themselves in saving me the aggravation of checking those hard to access rear stems on our bikes.

RICZ
02-11-2011, 10:28 AM
And what if you had picked up something that punctured your tire on the last ride? I do a visual preflight inspection before every ride by rotating the tires and looking for anything that might have punctured them. On a couple occasions I had to abort the ride I was about to take because I found a nail or a screw in a tire. The good news was I got to fix it in the comfort and convenience of my garage instead of beside a road somewhere.

dirtdobber
02-11-2011, 10:42 AM
Most likely you will need to rotate the tire to get to the valve stem any way. I usually put my bike on the jack any way to do the tires because it it is easier and only takes a few minutes. Check for cupping, objects that do not belong, wipe the rim down and air up.
I check the air in the shocks at the same time if I am riding 2 up.
I can do it all in about 10 minutes max.

Dog gone it I just remembered I have a set of wheels to polish today

BBob
02-11-2011, 10:43 AM
I am trying out some new caps I found at 1 of the bike supplies centers. They have a green center and what ever pressure you run there is a cap for it in even numbers.

I tried those on my Electra Glide. The front one broke off as soon I came off my driveway. They sound good in theory but they need to be made much better before I would consider trying them again.

I can feel if one of the tires gets low. I can't feel 1 or 2 psi but I can feel 5 psi low.

visionjohnny
02-11-2011, 06:31 PM
I am trying out some new caps I found at 1 of the bike supplies centers. They have a green center and what ever pressure you run there is a cap for it in even numbers.

I tried those on my Electra Glide. The front one broke off as soon I came off my driveway. They sound good in theory but they need to be made much better before I would consider trying them again.

I can feel if one of the tires gets low. I can't feel 1 or 2 psi but I can feel 5 psi low.


I was told check your tires when cold. Hot tire air should expand and read more PSI.

dirtdobber
02-11-2011, 07:12 PM
RICZ and BBob thanks for the information. I didn't think they could be much use due to the price but thought I would try them.

I'll put them in 1 of my cans that I put failed stuff in.

You should always check/add air when the tires are cold. There are exceptions which would be poor handling after riding. When I have to do this I subtract 2lbs. Not saying I am right but it seems to make a difference. The Only time I have had to do this is the TPS on my GW works after you get moving, usually within a few hundred feet and that once I was unable to get a air supply for a few miles. This was also when I discovered my pressure gauge wasn't working properly.
So it is important to have a good gauge.