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post #1 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 12:11 PM Thread Starter
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Default suggestions for a new rider

I am new to riding and though I like the styling and have read a lot of good reviews about Victory I have also been told it is best to start with a low CC bike. I've been looking at the vegas 8-ball. I'm just looking for suggestions on what a good beginner bike might be and if I should wait to consider a Victory until I have more experience.
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post #2 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 12:39 PM
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This has been discussed several times and there have been numerous suggestions. The only thing that was uncontested was the motorcycle safety course. Look in you local phone directory and/or call motorcycle dealerships to find one. It will cost you $200-$300 dollars but will be completely worth it. You'll most likely learn on a very small cc bike (250) and depending on your state laws you can either get a general license for any cc bike or you may be offered the opportunity to test on a larger bike that will allow you to ride something bigger than 650cc.

The course will teach you the basics of riding, how to control a motorcycle and evasive manuvers that will prove invaluable on the streets. The most important thing it will teach you is if you are actually fit to ride a motorcycle. Example, my daughter wanted a motorcycle badly; she took the course, it scared the crap out of her - it cost me $300 and possible saved her life. Motorcycles aren't like cars, if you're nervous in a car you can get over it but if you're nervous on a motorcycle you're an accident waiting to happen.

This is where the disputes normally start. If you must buy a bike I suggest buying a cheap small bike, 650cc would be best. It will get you used to riding and save you money. Dropping a $600-$700 bike will not have near as much impact as dropping a $14K bike. When you're ready for a bigger bike sell your started bike to someone else that is in your situation.

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post #3 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 12:43 PM
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+ 1 Motorcycle Safety Course.
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post #4 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 01:31 PM
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I've read a few of the discussions, and will add my two cents. I recently bought an 04 Vegas 8 Ball after a 10 year break from riding.

1) Taking a course is a must. It will be the most important and valuable thing you can do. I took a course when I first started riding, and still practise what I learned every day.

2) Jumping right onto a bad ass bike? My suggestion see how you do with the course. As long as you're comfortable, go right into the Vic, if you don't you'll be pining for the "real" bike. Just respect the Power of the Bike. Don't be cocky or stupid too early. Be prepared to drop the bike at some point. Everyone has, if not they probably will.

This bike will have more power than you know what do with it if you roll it 100%. That was the biggest eye opener for me getting onto the Vic, it had a whole other level of torque and power I had to adjust to. Basically, know your limitations. I've had my bike out for a month and a half, and I still haven't given it 100%.

So what if you ride it like Grandma drives a car for the first while, being safe and riding within your limitations is best.

Good Luck
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post #5 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 02:08 PM
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I suggest buying an inexpensive, smaller bike (after you have taked the safety course).

This is for two reasons- and not for what you might think. Yes, a smaller bike is easier to ride, and if it is cheaper it might not hurt as much (both physically and psycologically) if you drop it, but it is also great because you can get yourself into a lot of trouble with a big bike. Speed is a big thing, both too fast and slow riding in parking lots and traffic.

Also, there is a chance that you make not like riding the bike you have. A friend of mine got a great deal on a Vulcan Nomad because a guy bought it for his first bike, and relised that he would rather be in a car. Because you want to ride does not always mean that you will want to ride, if you get my drift. Another friend bought a Nighttrain, and found out that he was afraid of traffic and sold it after a season, losing about 4 grand in the process.
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post #6 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 02:11 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks all. I have the class lined up already and I'm not buying anything until afterwards. I appreciate the inputs.
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post #7 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 03:36 PM
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You'll get cheaper insurance with a coarse
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post #8 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 04:01 PM
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This would vary from state to state, but in Texas, passing the safety course allowed me to get a motorcycle endorsement on my TDL with only a written exam. Which I aced.

Another vote for a smaller used bike to start. I ignored this advice because, at my age I felt I didn't have time for the whole learning curve. So, yes, I was dropping a brand new bike that weighed over 600 pounds. This was usually in grass and I never really did any damage, but it does happen to everyone at the beginning.

Last edited by Tom Kirk; 05-30-2011 at 11:19 PM.
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post #9 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 04:42 PM
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Like Ammo said, Number 1 thing take course. Number 2 Buy a smaller bike. You dont want the bike to be so intimidating that you can't concentrate on honing your skills. My wife just finished her course and got license. She took my jackpot out in a parking lot and the size of the bike made her real nervous. So we are now shopping for a little suzuki S40, which is a 650. Start small you will grow into it. Enjoy the road!!

06 jackpot
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and not enough chrome!
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post #10 of 39 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 05:09 PM
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Yliax,
Glad to hear you have scheduled a MSF class; this is the most important step. One thing that I didn't bring up is a dirt bike. If you know someone that has a dirt bike (small cc) that could teach you a little about clutching you'll save yourself a little embarassment.

The majority of people that drop a bike during the class (my daughter included) drop it because they haven't had enough time practicing clutch techniques. Keep in mind that the clutch will be slightly different on every bike -- even when they're the same make/model/year. The problem is that you'll do A LOT of low speed manuvers; the slower you're moving the more attention you have to pay to the clutch. Weaving through cones at about 1-2 MPH if you stall and you aren't ready for a stall chances are you'll tip due to low speed combined with a tight turn and an instructor telling you to keep your feet up. Once you get the basics down it's a piece of cake.

Good luck in your class; I hope that you do well and find that you enjoy riding as much as you hope to.

Retired USAF, IYAAYAS!

2008 V-Star 1100 Custom Bobber project

2011 Crimson XR with Forged Highway Bars / Hard Bags / Passenger Backrest, Ness parts including Smooth Layback Plate Frame/Mount / Rad 3 Mirror / deep cut grips / drivers floorboards /shifter peg / brake peg / passenger pegs. Witchdoctor black rack, Lloydz filter / timing wheel / VFC III, 7Jurock windshield, Drag Specialties seat.
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