Belt maintenance? - Victory Forums - Victory Motorcycle Forum
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post #1 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-12-2014, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
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Default Belt maintenance?

I'm seriously considering getting a new Cross Country Tour as soon as the weather gets better. I've never owned a belt-drive motorcycle. What maintenance, if any, does a belt require? In fact, if taking a really long trip, like 5,000 miles, other than an oil change, would I expect to have to do any maintenance while on the road?
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post #2 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-12-2014, 12:31 PM
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i usually just change the oil every 3000 miles. fill it up with gas and when i need a new set of tires the belt gets adjusted. other than that you should be good to go!!!
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post #3 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-12-2014, 12:46 PM
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Just periodic visual inspections and tension checks. I guess if you encountered some really bad roads like with debris being kicked up, etc then I would check it over very carefully once past that. Unlikely that a rock would cause big damage to a belt, but if you throw enough ammo @ a target- sooner or later you'll hit something. If you're not sure what to look for- there is a detailed section about inspecting belts in the manual.

Adjusting belt tension @ home reads like a real bitch, but if you have the tools and smarts.. Personally I will probably let a dealer do that.

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post #4 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-12-2014, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nyram View Post
i usually just change the oil every 3000 miles. fill it up with gas and when i need a new set of tires the belt gets adjusted. other than that you should be good to go!!!
And the new XC's don't require an oil change but every 5000 miles.

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post #5 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-12-2014, 01:42 PM
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Oil change at 5K. Belt, inspect daily and ride. X-Bikes are kind of a dilemma for the unwashed dealers so keep an eye on THEM. They start off loose then tighten up as the chassis expands with heat. They need to be 24 hour cool, dry and clean. OM will explain.
I'm new to belts as well. Still not cozy with them, mostly because of the statement above, but am warming up to it. Would still rather have a good shaft drive, but life isn't perfect.

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post #6 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-12-2014, 06:01 PM
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Rylan at The Vick Shop say's every oil change take a old or new tooth brush with soap and water scrub belt.
Your belt will stretch a 1/8" in the first 500 miles and will not stretch after that. Your belt should stay in proper adjustment in between tire life and that around 15 thousand miles. Guys have a bitch of a time getting belt aliened right cause they believe the marks on each side of the swing arm are the same and there not.
You should be able ride coast to coast with no belt trouble.
One bike I had the belt lasted over a 100 thousand miles. Vic will tell you to change it before that. If you take care of it and stay off gravel and dirt roads for the most part you should go a long time.

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post #7 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-12-2014, 07:53 PM
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Yeah agreed. I think the interval Victory publishes is a bit ridiculous at best. Many dealers have their own schedule which is often a joke- like 2500 mile oil changes, etc.

I'll replace mine when I see early signs of wear, and still be conservative about it. When I start to see a few splits on the sides- the kind of stuff that the manual says to be aware of- but still OK to go. I think my riding environment is about as friendly as it can be to a belt. I stay away from shitty roads, and keep the bike parked when covered with the leftover debris of fighting winter weather, etc.. Hopefully this will result in several tire changes between new belts.

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post #8 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-13-2014, 10:09 AM
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Final drive belts are here to stay and it's for a reason. A properly maintained and tensioned belt can and will run 100k+ miles. As someone who has been on belt bikes for over 20 years I can assure you that they are extremely dependable.

Judge Redd stated that critical rock damage is unlikely but that is the one area where a belt can bite you. A rock hole in the belt isn't a deal breaker unless it hits the edge and I've had that happen only once in over a quarter million miles on belt bikes. I've no idea where it came from as I don't ride on dirt roads but it can happen. Typically a high mile belt will have at least one rock hole in it somewhere.

Don't sweat having a belt final drive, it's actually the most efficient method of driving the rear wheel. Less weight in the drive train means more horsepower to the bottom of the rear tire.
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post #9 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-13-2014, 10:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostintexas View Post
.... Would still rather have a good shaft drive, but life isn't perfect.....
This is an interesting view point to me. One of the reasons why I bought the Victory is because it used a belt final drive rather than a shaft drive. Shaft drive is fine for bikes that don't make much power but once you start making a decent amount of torque the jacking effect of the shaft sucks.

Would you guys really rather have a shaft drive on these bikes?

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post #10 of 77 (permalink) Old 03-13-2014, 11:10 AM
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I rode BMW Cafe Racers in the 70's, one of the things that some of the people that I rode with learned the hard way was the tendency of the Beemer shafts to "jack up" on acceleration or "drop" when you closed the throttle quickly. It was the combination of a huge amount of travel in the suspension and the soft springs that were used on stock bikes. Entering a turn too hot and closing the throttle when you were tucked down in tight could and would cause the bike to drop enough that you could touch down either on the center stand or even the rocker cover and lever the rear wheel off the ground. The japanese bikes of today don't have the tendency near as much as the older shaft bikes given stiffer suspensions and less travel.

Belt drives are a lot more forgiving when it comes to issues like this. Also it's a lot less expensive to engineer and produce a belt final than a shaft and in my opinion the maintenance of a belt is a fraction of chain or shaft drive.
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