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Has anyone had this done? I saw a list on another site that seemed to coincide with the checks in the Owner's manual, but skipped or at least lined through two of the only time consuming jobs i.e. lubing the steering head bearings and changing the fork oil.

They still charged the guy over $600 to change his oil and "inspect" a bunch of things like the exhaust pipes. :rolleyes:

I will definitely be investing a lift that can get my bike high enough in the air to pull the rear wheel. I've not had a lot of success in my Googling. Anyone know of a good one that will get our Cross bikes 30" or so in the air?
 

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Has anyone had this done? I saw a list on another site that seemed to coincide with the checks in the Owner's manual, but skipped or at least lined through two of the only time consuming jobs i.e. lubing the steering head bearings and changing the fork oil.

They still charged the guy over $600 to change his oil and "inspect" a bunch of things like the exhaust pipes. :rolleyes:

I will definitely be investing a lift that can get my bike high enough in the air to pull the rear wheel. I've not had a lot of success in my Googling. Anyone know of a good one that will get our Cross bikes 30" or so in the air?
I have done that job on other bikes at least once just to make sure it had good grease. I was not planning to do it every 15k. Not sure if Vic's are greased well from the factory, but Kawasaki's are not.

I would do these jobs at the same time for sure, but not sure I will touch mine at 15k. Problem with the steering is getting them torqued down right. On the Kawi it was a pain. My XC is out of the weather most of the time and garaged at home and at work. I think 15k may be overkill on the steering, at least for me. Wheel bearings go much longer and spin much more. Unless I can feel steering changes, I may just run them longer then replace them down the road vs grease every 15k. Replacing them is not much worse then getting to them to grease.
 

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I have read in the owners manual what you should do. I don't believe all of it.
My break fluids check out fine. ( auto part store has a test kit for $3.95)
My clutch fluid was dark so I changed it. ( cadre full there is a metal peace on the bottom that come out of place)
My belt looks just fine.
When I hit thirty thousand I'll do fork oil and repack bearing.
For the rest I lube pivot place on a every three month basics.
I pulled air filter in the spring and blue it out now in August I'll do it again. Next year a new one.
I think you have to do what you feel is best for you. If you ride on dirt roads and in lots of rain then yes do.
 

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Has anyone had this done? I saw a list on another site that seemed to coincide with the checks in the Owner's manual, but skipped or at least lined through two of the only time consuming jobs i.e. lubing the steering head bearings and changing the fork oil.

They still charged the guy over $600 to change his oil and "inspect" a bunch of things like the exhaust pipes. :rolleyes:

I will definitely be investing a lift that can get my bike high enough in the air to pull the rear wheel. I've not had a lot of success in my Googling. Anyone know of a good one that will get our Cross bikes 30" or so in the air?
Geez... $600 is highway robbery if they didn't at least adjust the neck bearing and change the fork oil!

It's amazing how fast the fork oil will lose it's ability to do its job and get full of metal particles. I personally won't let the inverted forks go more than 20k miles between fork oil changes. The 15k interval is about right though.

My personal opinion on the neck bearings is that it isn't as important to grease them at 15k miles or whenever as it is to adjust them so there's no play. Once they get a little loose and whether or not you can hear the clunk it makes; the bearings are getting pounded a bit every time. Eventually it leaves a flat spot on the bearings that you can feel in the steering. The bearings will need to be replaced at that time because that flat spot feeling is really annoying. Replacing the bearings is a heck of a lot bigger job that greasing them and waaaaaay bigger than adjusting them.

SB: I've been using the Harbor Freight lifts (both kinds) for years without a problem. The issue with Vic's, like some other bikes that come to mind, is they don't sit flat on a lift so it's matter of finding that sweet spot to lift from. On my XC I've found a slight angle rather than a 90 degree angle to be a bit better. Trial and error is usually what it takes to get it sit well enough. Some folks are really adamant about strapping the bike down to the lift. I never have and have never had a problem with it. Then again; maybe I've just been lucky so far. (Knocking on wood now)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's amazing how fast the fork oil will lose it's ability to do its job and get full of metal particles. I personally won't let the inverted forks go more than 20k miles between fork oil changes. The 15k interval is about right though.
Bingo.

http://video.mpora.com/watch/Je4gKpr11/

My personal opinion on the neck bearings is that it isn't as important to grease them at 15k miles
Probably not, but I'd feel better that they got checked and packed well if they weren't at the factory at least once before they get too many miles on them.

SB: I've been using the Harbor Freight lifts
The ones I find from HF don't lift more than about 16". This concerns me with the XR because I'm not sure if I drop the swingarm, there will be sufficient room under the long fender to squeeze the wheel/tire in/out. Simple math says no, but there may be tricks I'm unaware of. Know any?

I've got a car jack and with a board in-between the jack and the bike, I've lifted the bike on it. The problem is that I have to use jack stands under the swing arm to keep it stable. That won't work if I want to drop the swingarm. I suppose I could stop being lazy and disassemble the rear fender and exhausts, but overcoming lazy ain't easy.
 

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Saddlebag, I use the Harbor freight jack and got the back tire off no problem. attached (i hope) is a pic showing the rear tire off using it. I am doing my 15K oil change right now with it slightly off the ground and there is plenty of room to get the forks out. I just don't know if I have the guts to do the fork oil myself. The manual says to use special tools to measure the oil level and to take out the springs. If you do it on your own, I would like to know how it was. cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Saddlebag, I use the Harbor freight jack and got the back tire off no problem. attached (i hope) is a pic showing the rear tire off using it.
Thanks, that makes me feel a lot better about it. Though it is still a bit mysterious to me. The bottom of the bike is already ~9" off the ground. If the jack lifts 16", that means the bike is only lifting ~7" off the ground. There is a bar directly behind the tire that secures the ends of the exhaust that is also ~16" high. After lifting. it would be ~23". The wheel/tire is ~25". That's why I'm concerned.

There must be enough slop under there with the swing arm off to cock it sideways a bit to get it in and out, eh?
 

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I will definitely be investing a lift that can get my bike high enough in the air to pull the rear wheel. I've not had a lot of success in my Googling. Anyone know of a good one that will get our Cross bikes 30" or so in the air?
I haven't done a ton of research in to it yet, but I'm looking at getting a J&S lift. VERY stable from what I've seen, even with no need to strap down (though I would as a precautionary measure).
 

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It is goin to be less effort next time because of the 2 into 1 pipe and no dummy pipe on the other side. But yes I got it in and out by tilting the tire and rim to the side. I also think I dropped the swing arm down by unbolting the rear shock as well. cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Saddlebag, I use the Harbor freight jack and got the back tire off no problem.
I too went with a HB, but I got the bigger model. The tongs were too far apart to get at the engine directly, so 2x4s were required.

She gets way up in the air now. It's got a big overhung moment and sways around a little up there in space, but overall it seems workable.

IMG_0818.jpg
 

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If you drop the swing arm its just in your way.
Just jack the bike up and with little cock of the tire slid it out.
If you want to drop the swing arm do it after you put tire back in place then you will not have to lift the tire. Now you have to lower the jack to get the link bolt back in and that can be a bitch.
So good Luck on what you ever do.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If you drop the swing arm its just in your way.
Just jack the bike up and with little cock of the tire slid it out.
If you want to drop the swing arm do it after you put tire back in place then you will not have to lift the tire. Now you have to lower the jack to get the link bolt back in and that can be a bitch.
So good Luck on what you ever do.
I don't think I understand you.

1. Aside from getting the to the axle bolt with a wrench, there appears to be no way to pull the axle without either dropping the swing arm or removing the exhaust.

2. What is the "link bolt," and why do I need to lower the jack to put it back?

3. It seems to me that after adjusting everything to be straight and tension the belt properly, the exhaust on the port side still needs to be removed to allow enough room to get a torque wrench on it. Another thing that bothers me is that the bolt is recessed such that about 1/3 of it is inaccessible. Why they couldn't have provided a spacer to make the bolt flush with the swing arm is curious.
 
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