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Just about broke in now.

So what do you think of it now. It ought to just about be broken in,ha,ha.:ltr: I got a 2011 Cross Roads, black in color,hard bags. I do not ride this one to work everyday,so it only has 5500 miles. Maybe you could write us a report on things that hold up good and those that do not:(. Also any mods that seem to help on one of your little trips. Enjoy the new bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Love Bike

This is my 5th bike in 10 years. It's the smoothest riding out of a Honda, two Suzuki, 1 Stratoliner (Yamaha). We traveled to Iowa for the Polaris Rally and Michigan for the longest runs this season.

We both purchased demo bikes. Mine had 5,000+ miles on it with a two year warranty.

So far new battery, starter, 2 clutches, front brakes, voltage something. I lost the second clutch coming in from a trip two weekends ago, cost me over $585 tow bill and 5 days down time?????? Got the paper to prove this......:confused:

Yes, I do know how to use a clutch............. Almost 200,000 miles in the last 10 riding seasons to prove this. Drove a standard since the 70's in all my cars. I know now how one handles when it goes out so maybe won't have the tow bill again if it happens again.

I don't think this bike has the quick reply that my Stratoliner did, but than it was 1900 and also about 1/2" too tall for me. I didn't want to get it lowered since the rake was already out there so traded on the Victory.

I love the storage capacity, but I end up filling up the huge bags. It handles great w/the weight on wet and dry roadways. I can ride my tank to tank w/comfort not shaking me to death like other bikes have. The pick up is there (sort of ) when I need it.

If these Victories don't self destruct, I'm planning on a lot more than 14,000 miles next season. Oh yes, have to compliment the mechanic at the Canton dealership. He's been great keeping me on the road.

In fact we are thinking about trading for new Victories in November. I'm wanting a Cross Country and hubby is wanting a Ness. Mostly because of the great service we have had since we pulled them out of the shop back in April. We NEVER have had such great bike service on any of the other brands we have owned.

Does this answer?
 

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Erl

So I take it Kevinx is serious about asking what oil you run. The reason being is going through two clutches I am pretty sure. The other thing I was thinking on the clutch problem is if you always have it serviced are they checking the freeplay in the clutch lever. You have to keep a small amount in the lever or it will slip especially accelerating hard. My last bike was a Triumph, the model I had was known to have weak clutches. I never had to change it while I owned it and it had almost 74K on it when I sold it. I always kept it adjusted and I did not try to do burn outs or pull wheelies,so I am sure that helped.Also I did run a good synthetic motorcycle oil. I do know that revving the engine up and dumping the clutch will shorten the life quite a bit, so if you do this once in awhile(just for fun!) you ought to plan on doing the clutch more often:D.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Maintenance

The dealership has done ALL the oil changes, and ALL the maintenance that needs to be done when it needs to be done according to the bike manual. I do NOT do burn outs, and have no idea of how to do a wheelie..........

We also do not do any of the maintenance ourselves. I depend on the dealership.

I'm taking the bike back in next week to have a 500 mile adjustment to the free play on the clutch lever. Mechanic mentioned that this hadn't been done after they installed the first clutch.... He said this might have been the problem.

I do go at higher speeds on the interstates, haven't had it beyond 90 yet.

I sincerely thank you for trying to figure this thing out for me. I'm just praying it doesn't happen again or if it does I'll be within a normal towing distance to a Victory dealership.
 

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Psy , I did mean well. Been wrenching(mechanic) for years professionally. Have done clutches on numerous types of machines including motorcycles. I do know as an old mechanic that things do get missed ,unfortunately. So hopefully things do go better and you can always make sure that there is just a little bit of freeplay yourself at the clutch lever. Have the people who you pay dearly do your work show you how to check the free play. If they do not want to show you how to check it for free after having your bike worked on I would start looking for a new bike mechanic. Sounds like you have given them plenty of your hard earned cash,so hopefully they do make you happy and keep your bike running good. Enjoy the bike and I do hope it serves you well. thumb up
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Service

Oh no.....

I didn't mean to imply that my dealership mechanic hasn't been doing what is needed to be done on my bike. On the contrary, He's done an 'outstanding' job or otherwise I wouldn't be riding almost 90 miles one way just to get to this particular shop.

He has been so helpful trying to keep me from having future troubles. He explained 'free play' in detail after replacing the 2nd clutch.

He has ALWAYS taken time to explain to me what needs done and what he has done when it's time for me to go.

I honestly trust him more than any other mechanic that I have dealt with on bikes in the last ten years. He is super busy, but has ALWAYS taken time and tired to keep the costs down as much as possible. I feel very lucky that I am dealing with such a great professional and hopefully he will be at this dealership for the life of my bike.

One big problem is that I know exactly NOTHING about the mechanics of a bike. I don't like my husband working on 'my' bike since everything he has ever done to my past bikes normally did not work out in some way. I don't even like him riding my bike nor do I ride his.

We took the chance of purchasing demo bikes, used bikes..... Just thank heavens for the 2 year warranty. We will see what comes next.

I've done 14,000+ miles so far this riding season. One of my groups is set to go out Friday once again for the weekend. Just being on my bike keeps me happy. Riding is a total obsession on my part.

Thanks again for the help. I really appreciate any input that might help.
 

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I'm taking the bike back in next week to have a 500 mile adjustment to the free play on the clutch lever. Mechanic mentioned that this hadn't been done after they installed the first clutch.... He said this might have been the problem.
I am new to Victorys but have spent (or wasted, depends on who you ask) better than four decades on motorcycles. I can't honestly recall a mechanic or anyone representing a motorcycle service department ever telling me with a straight face that they did not adjust clutch lever play after a clutch job but if they had or if I thought they had, well let's say there are better places for me to spend my money in the future.

Maybe I'm reading this wrong. Maybe the wrench was opining that a previous shop installed the clutch and didn't check play. That makes more sense to me since once in a while one wrench will badmouth another's work. I know, it's hard to believe but it does happen.

I do not know Victorys like I do other American motorcycles but a brief Googling informs me that your issue of three clutches in 14k is not a problem other Vic riders are complaining about so that kind of eliminates a design flaw from the list of culprits. Possibly, but unlikely, some component of the clutch system, inclusive of the lever and it's pivot mechanism and the cable itself that were not replaced the first two times are playing havoc with your clutches. Odds are no. Maybe one clutch pack was defective or the wrench did a botch job but two clutches in a row? Odds are no. So we are left with one other part that was present during the failure of clutch one and clutch two. The MOCC- Motorcycle Operations Control Center- that's the part that connects the handlebars to the seat. In a spanking huge number of cases the defective part that precipitates clutch failure is the MOCC. Odds are in favor of this option.

Sometimes the MOCC works fine on some motorcycles but when installed on a particular bike it doesn't deliver the kind of input required to insure the longevity of the clutch. In that case reprogramming the MOCC input logic is required to bring it into compliance with that clutch. This is mostly a trial and error activity requiring patience and attention to how MOCC inputs affect clutch operation. I bet your mechanic can help you through this process. Granted the manual probably doesn't cover it indepth.

Also of note, clutch failure due to MOCC hole shot or tire burn or other embarrassingly pointless inputs is not the most common cause of MOCC induced clutch failure. Long clutch engagements and slipping the clutch at starts and in stop and go traffic have done more general damage to clutches than stupid stunts, although it is rewarding to see stupid stunts result in smoked clutches.

Anyway, I have to disagree with you on one point. In fact you do know something about the mechanics of your bike. You know that it is possible to be on your third clutch in 14k miles and that right there is a significant bit of mechanical knowledge.

That little piece of information makes a good argument to even the least mechanically inclined among us to think long and hard about developing the skill for checking and adjusting the clutch lever play as part of a regular pre-ride checklist. Really it is not much more of a chore than checking oil and topping it off.

Correct play at the lever may not prevent another clutch failure, but it is such an easy thing to maintain (and exactly 585$ cheaper than a 585$ tow bill). Just sayin...

OK, last thing. We too often compare our bikes to cars. I think a better comparison is to a personal plane. Not the recreation bit. Planes and motorcycles get used in other roles than recreation. The thing that really distinguishes a bike from a car and likens it more to an aircraft is that we take our cars reliability for granted. You hop in your car and put the key in the ignition and expect it to deliver you to your destination. If it fails mechanically along the way the odds of your getting hurt during the failures are remote at best. Mostly you coast to the shoulder and call the hook. The same can happen with a motorcycle and even a plane can sometimes be coaxed to a safe landing but the possibility of injury from mechanical failure is significantly higher in the plane and it is on a motorcycle too. Loose this's and that's, worn, wobbly whatsit's and yes, incorrect clutch free play are all gremlins that can end up testing just how much protection your leathers really offer.

A brief pre-flight check regularly performed and a willingness to apply a wrench for adjustment here and there might make a world of difference. After all, if a wheel falls off your car you get a bumpy ride into the ditch. If a wheel falls off your bike, it's a 90 horsepower unicycle and the bumps leave marks.

None of us came out of the chute with wrenches for arms Psy and a trusted mechanic is always the best tool in your tool roll. Still, one of the joys of motorcycling that you may be missing is the one that comes from beating some gremlin with your own two hands (especially a puny little gremlin like clutch play).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
T h a n k s !!!!!!!!!

Thanks to KevinX, Speedblue, Pop for all your information. Believe me I've read and re-read and even took some notes. I wanted to be sure to ask my mechanic about your points next week and follow up.

IF - and I'm hoping thats a big IF - if this happens again, I'll be trading off Victories for sure, I guess for a Street Glide. That was the runner up brand before we purchased the Cross Roads. I've always said I'd NEVER ride a Harley, but......

I actually wanted a Cross Country without the tour pack, but the demo deal was more to our pocket book this past spring. We are probably going to come into some $$$$ this November so maybe a trade off wouldn't hurt too much. We will see...

Anyhow happy biking for at least a few more rides before Old Man Winter sets for the folks in this area.
 

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Demo model......

Noticed you did say you had bought a demo model. I bought a floor model stereo years ago from Sears. That was the last time I bought a floor model for an appliance. I must admit I have been leery of demo models every since. I seen a lot of people on the Victory demo rides run the ***** out of the bike when they could and brake as hard as they could without locking up the wheels. Now I know I rode at probably 5 or 6 demo rides over the years before buying my XR. So now just figure they stop in just about every major city in the country and let people take out the bikes on demos. That is a lot of different riders on each bike running the ----- out of that bike. So I wonder if you actually got a demo bike off of the Victory demo truck or just a demo from the local dealer. Personally I would rather pay a few more $$$ and then know that it was the mechanic who put the bike together and myself that actually broke the bike in and not 100 different people at each stop from all over the country. You could also think of it as a rental car,lots of people abuse rental cars when they rent them,some drive normal, some are very abusive.--Hopefully they got all the bugs worked out and proves to be a good bike from now on. I guess I am trying to say that a demo bike is not a good bike to judge the entire line of bikes from as far as problems. I do under stand how you feel and when a product gives you a bunch of headaches you want to get rid of the headache. Again I hope the bike serves you well from now on. Good luck.thumb up
 

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Pop,
Awesome post!

Speedblue,
You post is accurate to the T! One of my local dealers had their demo day at a racetrack in 2011. Needless to say there were 75-100 riders per day that rode the p!$$ out of the bikes. Figuring 75 riders taking 5 bikes each on a mile long twisty track with a couple of straights that could could break 100 mph on. Those bikes left on the truck with 375 additional miles that most likely equaled over 1000 miles of wear and tear per bike.

Psy,
Were your bikes from the demo fleet or were they dealer demos? If you don't know for sure it's pretty accurate to assume they were fleet demos because they had 1000 or more miles on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
More Clutch Information

R U guys getting tired of this topic yet?????

You are so right about purchasing a used/demo bike and believe me I thought of all of this, but we both wanted different bikes so this was the way to go with the money that was available. Money was/is tight since we are both retired..... This is suppose to be fun.

Anyhow another straw;
Rode my bike for about 200+ miles yesterday, local secondary roads, small towns, so stop and go traffic. Had absolutely no problem with the clutch..... I was being super careful using the clutch correctly....
(First really good ride since I picked it up from the dealer and second clutch replacement)

Decided to do interstate coming back to beat the dark/cold.

Had the cruise set at 69 (65 miles speed limit). The bike was fine UNTIL I decided to pull off into a rest area to add more layers of clothing.

I lightly touched the front brake to disengage the cruise, pulled the clutch back to start down shifting. The motor revde up, the gears display was really erratic on the speedo going from 6 to 4 back to 6. I almost ran over a curb watching this.

I finally hit both brakes with the clutch lever depressed to slow down and started downshifting normally......

Doesn't that motor doing this is saying that the clutch is still slipping?.

Once I got more clothing on, pulled out, set the cruise back to 69. It ran fine all the way home, about 100 more miles or so.

Could the cruise control be part of this problem?????? I have been using the cruise a LOT when possible, but isn't that is what it's for?

The cruise has been nuts ever since I got the bike and was replaced when it just failed to set when we were going into NY under warranty. In fact everything they have done to the clutch/starter/battery was all done under warranty....

Thanks,
 

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Psy,
My guess on the clutch is that the first replacement only involved the plates when it most likely needed all the clutch parts. Hopefully they replaced everything the second time around.

Your cruise should automatically disengage if it is turned off or if either brake is slightly depressed. It will shut off with the clutch but only when the engine revs and the computer senses overrun. In order for your cruise to work properly you should have 1/16-1/8 slack in your throttle. If you adjust your throttle and it still acts up search the forums for relearn or re-learn to get to the thread that explains the procedure. It's easy user maintenance stuff so you should be able to accomplish it in a few minutes and should not have to make another visit to the dealer.

While you're browsing around look for posts by BBob. Once you find one look for a link to manuals. This link contains shops manuals for most Victory models ad is a bit of a pain to use as it isn't Internet Explorer friendly and prefers Mozilla (find a free download on Google) but it saves you a ton on a paper copy and gives you all the info you need to work on anything you feel comfortable working on!
 

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i have a 2011 xr, black too, if i have that many problems out of it in 14000 miles i will be going back to harley.
 

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R U guys getting tired of this topic yet?????

You are so right about purchasing a used/demo bike and believe me I thought of all of this, but we both wanted different bikes so this was the way to go with the money that was available. Money was/is tight since we are both retired..... This is suppose to be fun.

Anyhow another straw;
Rode my bike for about 200+ miles yesterday, local secondary roads, small towns, so stop and go traffic. Had absolutely no problem with the clutch..... I was being super careful using the clutch correctly....
(First really good ride since I picked it up from the dealer and second clutch replacement)

Decided to do interstate coming back to beat the dark/cold.

Had the cruise set at 69 (65 miles speed limit). The bike was fine UNTIL I decided to pull off into a rest area to add more layers of clothing.

I lightly touched the front brake to disengage the cruise, pulled the clutch back to start down shifting. The motor revde up, the gears display was really erratic on the speedo going from 6 to 4 back to 6. I almost ran over a curb watching this.

I finally hit both brakes with the clutch lever depressed to slow down and started downshifting normally......

Doesn't that motor doing this is saying that the clutch is still slipping?.

Once I got more clothing on, pulled out, set the cruise back to 69. It ran fine all the way home, about 100 more miles or so.

Could the cruise control be part of this problem?????? I have been using the cruise a LOT when possible, but isn't that is what it's for?

The cruise has been nuts ever since I got the bike and was replaced when it just failed to set when we were going into NY under warranty. In fact everything they have done to the clutch/starter/battery was all done under warranty....

Thanks,
What you describe here has nothing to do with a failing clutch. It describes a situation that the brake was not moved far enough to disengage the cruise. Then when you pulled the clutch; then engine revved trying to keep speed, and then the cruise was shut off though the clutch switch(not instant). Since the shift indicator is based on an equation that factors speed and RPM. You confused it.
 
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