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Just hit 500 miles on my CCT... the question is, should I take the bike to the dealer for its 500 mile service, or can I do it myself? Is there something only the dealer techs can do?
 

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I had mine done at the dealer. Some folks say it's just a glorified oil change, the dealer says otherwise. So be it.

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Just hit 500 miles on my CCT... the question is, should I take the bike to the dealer for its 500 mile service, or can I do it myself? Is there something only the dealer techs can do?
I think it's wise to get the dealer to perform the first service.
Didn't they throw that in free as part of the deal when you purchased?
Oil changes are simple and straightforward if you're handy on the tools and know clockwise from anti clockwise.
There's more to the first service than dumping the break in oil but.
A good dealership will give your bike a thorough going over. Including the important drive belt readjustment and clutch cable ends.
A table of scheduled maintenance tasks is in your Victory handbook.
Your bikes plugged into the computer which shows up any error codes and records the fact that your bikes been back for its first service.
 
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I'm taking mine in for the 500 I have no idea if they will really do a complete 500 service on it but at minimum they can't void my warranty claiming I didn't perform the proper service. After that I will do my own service work.
That's my rationalization for it anyhow
 
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use a black pen put a dot on the axle bolt one on the clutch cable adjuster.
who cares if they see the marks you'll know. Read the service paper and ask what did they do there or there. Make them aware your one that wants to know about your bike
 
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Put a service manual in my hands and I'm not sure anyone at the dealer is more qualified to perform a service on the bike outside major engine work. And even then...they've just got better tools and facilities.

Which is really a fair reason to consider them. They've already got all the info and correct tools to do the job. The cost can save your worry, time, and effort.

However, if you have a torque wrench, the appropriate metric sockets and Allens (the front axle is an oddball), and a belt tension gauge, there's nothing particularly mechanically complex about the procedure.

Mine's seen a dealer once for a fork seal. That goes back to the "correct tools and facilities" issue.
 

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use a black pen put a dot on the axle bolt one on the clutch cable adjuster.
who cares if they see the marks you'll know. Read the service paper and ask what did they do there or there. Make them aware your one that wants to know about your bike
You make a good point VJ
 

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I tried to get the dealer to throw in the 500 mile oil change and check but they wouldn't do it so I did it and documented it was done and saved the oil (Victory oil and filter) receipt so they couldn't say it wasn't done. See if you can find a model and year close to what you have in my sig line for free service manuals. It's all fairly basic stuff and you will want to learn how to do it if you don't already anyway. Check clutch adjustment, brake fluid levels, belt tension (this one is the trickiest) and alignment, neck bearings for slop, loose bolts and axle nuts, tire pressure, basically the same thing you would do on a regular basis anyway.
 

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I too thought it was important to get the dealer to do the 500 mile service but like most stealerships and their mechanics, they didn't do squat and screwed my bike up to boot. I started questioning why he wasn't doing this or that (things listed in the service manual) and he made up excuses that Polaris intervals for checking the belt, compression check, etc were too low. He then proceeded to run me out of his shop. At the end of the day he change the oil and put wd40 on a few moving parts. This was back when the closest Vic dealership was 2 hours from me. I got about half way home and felt warm oil on my left leg, the idiot put in 2 -3 more quarts of oil than he should have (or didn't properly drain the oil that was in there). I always do my own work on all my vehicles but I figured a "certified" mechanic would be a good choice for my first service. Did the "500" mile service myself the following weekend, not to hard to do except for the compression check.
 

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Did the "500" mile service myself the following weekend, not to hard to do except for the compression check.
Lets be clear , there is NO way the dealer is taking the time for a compression test at the 500 mile service . I am convinced they rev your engine a couple times , then change the oil and cant seem to get that right in most cases ... SAD .
 

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Important things at 500 miles are:
Snug down the header nuts.
Adjust belt tension (final drive).

Other items:
Grease the ends of the clutch cable.
Lube the shift linkage and kickstand (I use chain lube).
Tire pressure.

Of course, change the oil and filter.



The final drive belt will do most, if not all, of it's stretching in the first 500 miles or so. The engine cycling hot/cold and the exhaust gaskets crushing down will make re-torqueing the header connections a must. This may need to be done 2 or 3 times.
 

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If the 500 miles "service" is a screwing, wait until you have the 30K mile service! $600 for an oil change. I went through the needed items from my owners manual with the service manager when I picked the bike up and all that was done was an oil change and supposedly 80 point safety inspection. If you're good with minor mechanics then I say don't let your dealer touch your bike. I did it to preserve my extended warranty. Waste of money there too.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you all for the advise.
I think I'm pretty mechanically inclined. I have a buddy who Ive helped over the years servicing his 2007 kingpin... we've had the bike down to just frame... we have all the tools we would need (I hope) Ive been over the service manual and don't see anything I couldnt handle (except engine compression test, which as stated before, I doubt the dealer would do)

I think I will tackle the 500 mile service myself...

Thanks again for all the advice...
 

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Yeah so I paid $270 for my 500 mile service. Got my bike back in worse condition than when I dropped it off.
Heard a rattle, left forward exhaust shield clamp was dangling on the pipe just flapping in the breeze.
Was a cold morning when I drove down for the service so I used the heated seat and grips on the way down. Read, they worked fine. Next morning after service, no heated seat on the way to work.

And the one that really pissed me off.
After finding the clamp I started looking to see if they did anything else. My drive belt is tracking on the right side (outboard) and the edge is getting so hot it's glossy, looks like melted plastic.

I write the service manager an email and he starts telling me how it will track on one edge or the other, then he starts telling me about how Buell belts are on one side or the other doesn't matter, that's normal.... seriously dude???

I freakin hate having other people work on my vehicles
 

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Oh I didn't mention he told me how meticulous this particular mechanic is.
Hahaha, if he in fact put a socket on the left forward exhaust clamp he would have seen the heat shield clamp wasn't on the shield!
If he had any attention to detail he would have looked at the drive belt or if he did adjust it he would have checked the alignment after he adjusted
A joke, but not humorous at all
 

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Raise the rear wheel off the floor and spin it BACKWARDS . Watch the belt on the rear pulley while keeping the wheel spinning , if it tracks back towards the left it is probably aligned properly . They all track to the right edge of the rear pulley lip . My Hammer was the same way .

The final step in the manual for belt alignment has it tracking left to right while spinning the wheel forwards . Hope this helps .cheers
 

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I'm thinking that I need to do mine when it's time for it.
 

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Raise the rear wheel off the floor and spin it BACKWARDS . Watch the belt on the rear pulley while keeping the wheel spinning , if it tracks back towards the left it is probably aligned properly . They all track to the right edge of the rear pulley lip . My Hammer was the same way .

The final step in the manual for belt alignment has it tracking left to right while spinning the wheel forwards . Hope this helps .cheers

Why does the service manual say it should track on the inside of the pulley, which would be the left as seen from the rear of the bike looking forward?
This is how my Vegas tracks as well
 

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Why does the service manual say it should track on the inside of the pulley, which would be the left as seen from the rear of the bike looking forward?
This is how my Vegas tracks as well
It should track inside to outside when spinning forward and back to the inside when rotating backwards . If you rotate your wheel backwards and the belt tracks to the middle / inside , your good .

Just because the belt tracks to the edge of the outside of the pulley doesn't mean its jammed against it , just touching it .
 
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