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good information.
I like a few others never can learn enough to be safer
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
In my travels, I discovered something that happens a lot. CORNERS WITH NO DEFINABLE APEX. Either you can't see far enough around (trees, rocks, hills) or the curve is really LONG.

What to do? Stay in the middle until you can see the exit... then cut the curve off on the inside.

The worst scenario: You drop to the inside too early... the corner keeps going... you have no place to go but drift to the outside from where you are... you will find yourself running out of asphalt and cornering clearance. If you are turning right you will cross the center line.

We ride a whole lot of unfamiliar roads in places we have never been or only been a time or two. Turns can be downhill, off camber, decreasing radius... or all the above. If you're going to charge into the curves you'd better ride at a pace that allows you margin for error/line changes as necessary... and ride smart.

I find myself saying "Wait for it... wait for it..." because I tend to drop-in too early. I scared the **** out of myself on Rt 60 between the BRP and Lexington, VA last year (there are toilet bowl turns on that road), so I am more mindful of waiting until I can define an apex, but there are times when there really isn't one.
 

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In my travels, I discovered something that happens a lot. CORNERS WITH NO DEFINABLE APEX. Either you can't see far enough around (trees, rocks, hills) or the curve is really LONG.

What to do? Stay in the middle until you can see the exit... then cut the curve off on the inside.

The worst scenario: You drop to the inside too early... the corner keeps going... you have no place to go but drift to the outside from where you are... you will find yourself running out of asphalt and cornering clearance. If you are turning left you will cross the center line.

We ride a whole lot of unfamiliar roads in places we have never been or only been a time or two. Turns can be downhill, off camber, decreasing radius... or all the above. If you're going to charge into the curves you'd better ride at a pace that allows you margin for error/line changes as necessary... and ride smart.

I find myself saying "Wait for it... wait for it..." because I tend to drop-in too early. I scared the **** out of myself on Rt 60 between the BRP and Lexington, VA last year (there are toilet bowl turns on that road), so I am more mindful of waiting until I can define an apex, but there are times when there really isn't one.
I really liked that stretch when I rode it.

To be honest, I really don't come across decreasing radius all that often, but I tend to enter all right hand turns from near the center line. What I do occassionally run into is corners that last longer than I expect them to. I don't know if the turn tightens up any, but when you start to come out wide and the damn road keeps turning it can be a bit of a surprise.

The last time I really had a decreasing radius throw me for a loop was during Americade about 15 years ago. Fortunately, I was on a bike that had a lot of clearance.
 

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Always good to read articles like this one and keep your mind fresh on how to deal with them when you encounter those curves. The twisties near my house I ride much more aggressive than I do roads I am not to familiar with. I about got wiped out on route 215 in western NC last month by not one but three riders in a large group of HD's in such a curve. These were a bunch of weekend warriors that should not have been issued a motorcycle license.
 

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In my travels, I discovered something that happens a lot. CORNERS WITH NO DEFINABLE APEX. Either you can't see far enough around (trees, rocks, hills) or the curve is really LONG.

What to do? Stay in the middle until you can see the exit... then cut the curve off on the inside.

The worst scenario: You drop to the inside too early... the corner keeps going... you have no place to go but drift to the outside from where you are... you will find yourself running out of asphalt and cornering clearance. If you are turning right you will cross the center line.

We ride a whole lot of unfamiliar roads in places we have never been or only been a time or two. Turns can be downhill, off camber, decreasing radius... or all the above. If you're going to charge into the curves you'd better ride at a pace that allows you margin for error/line changes as necessary... and ride smart.

I find myself saying "Wait for it... wait for it..." because I tend to drop-in too early. I scared the **** out of myself on Rt 60 between the BRP and Lexington, VA last year (there are toilet bowl turns on that road), so I am more mindful of waiting until I can define an apex, but there are times when there really isn't one.
Someday, hopefully next summer I want to ride the dragon. I keep picturing some idiot running wide in a right hander crossing into my lane and taking me out.
Been watching to many youtube vids I guess.....

Also how many of you guys get surprised by cagers crossing the centre line in the twisties. This seems to be a real problem around here. They can't stay in there own lane going threw a corner. And if there in a right hander they drop off onto the shoulder flinging gravel all over the pavement....
 

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Just keep alert and don't outride your skills. I've been surprised by bikes, cars, and even 18 wheelers coming down my lane.
 

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Vanishing Point

In my travels, I discovered something that happens a lot. CORNERS WITH NO DEFINABLE APEX. Either you can't see far enough around (trees, rocks, hills) or the curve is really LONG.

...We ride a whole lot of unfamiliar roads in places we have never been or only been a time or two. Turns can be downhill, off camber, decreasing radius... or all the above. If you're going to charge into the curves you'd better ride at a pace that allows you margin for error/line changes as necessary... and ride smart.

I find myself saying "Wait for it... wait for it..." because I tend to drop-in too early. I scared the **** out of myself on Rt 60 between the BRP and Lexington, VA last year (there are toilet bowl turns on that road), so I am more mindful of waiting until I can define an apex, but there are times when there really isn't one.
Ever heard of the "vanishing point". This helps you to read the corner, whether it is opening out or tightening up.

See this link from the UK Yorkshire Police. Lots of curvy roads in Yorkshire.

http://www.northyorkshire.police.uk/8877

tom
 
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