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After following RICZ Tales From A Spyder Virgin, it got me thinking. Hard. Real Hard...

My wife (who rides her own bike) and I began having discussions about what our motorcycling future would like in a few years. We each have our own ailments (me - knees and shoulder, and her - hands and legs) and we know that we will eventually have to give up being on two wheels, and move on to something a little more 'age friendly'.

We have come to the conclusion that we get so much pleasure from being on our bikes, that we would age ~ even faster ~ if we didn't have riding to look forward to. So, we began looking at riding options, and decided that moving to 2-up on 3 wheels is much better that not riding at all.

So, like RICZ, we checked out the Spyder, and while his story was interesting, we still were not convinced that is what we wanted. After doing quite a bit of online research, we both decided that moving to a traditional Trike is what we wanted. With the obvious choices of getting either a Harley Tri-Glide, or a Honda Goldwing Trike. We weren't exactly thrilled with the Tri-Glide, so we looked further into a Goldwing Trike. This is when we discovered that many Goldwing's are converted to Trikes by the California Sidecar Company. With so many older model 'Wings still on the road (and fetching top dollar), there must be something to these CSC conversions.

So we went to their website in search of more information, and found this: Ventura - California Sidecar

I immediately thought "How cool (and rare) :ride:it would be to have a VICTORY TRIKE!" Then, r-e-a-l-i-t-y hit me: :frown
Victory parts will be next to impossible to find in less than 10 years. After investing that amount amount of money into converting my Cross-Country, that if a major component were to 'give up the ghost', then my 'rare' 3-wheeler' becomes nothing but yard art.

So my conundrum? Do I spend the money to have a Victory Trike, knowing that we may have to give up riding when a part breaks (or find a different bike), or do I go ahead and buy a Goldwing Trike, which will have parts available long after we have decided to give up riding altogether?
 

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I would stay on 2 wheels as long as you can. I am not as advanced in age as some on here but I do suffer from lower back problems and had a major back problem that started back last winter and lasted till this past fall. Lots of therapy and minor surgery and I am now back to 80% which is better than the near 0% of movement I was dealing with. Not to drag this story on but I did look at a Spyder ( I had test drove them in the past) and after test driving (yes "driving") one again I just did not get the same excitement out of it. To each their own but when the day comes that either my back or my age stops my 2-wheel riding then I will probably get a little convertible car.
 

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Never ridden one. They do look odd but I see plenty of them on the roads so they must be fun to many.
A traditional trike is a safe option. You can go order new parts for a '79 goldwing if you want so parts availability is never a concern.
They have "trike" kits that look more like training wheels where you still keep the rear tire and all that you have now. Those are easily moved to another bike. Not sure about availability for those fitting a Vic but I know it's cheaper.
 

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My wife loves her Spyder.
 

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To each their own, as they say. My suggestion is to lurk on the respective forums - I did that after deciding a Spyder was for us and I intend to do my own maintenance. The main thing I appreciate about Spyders is that they are purpose built to be a three wheeler, as opposed to trikes, which are converted from two wheelers. Spyders have nanny systems that keep it on the ground and in the curve if the operator gets stupid. I can see where my front wheels are and can avoid problems. I have seen trikers scrape a rear fender. Spyder models like mine or Vindex's wife's have 4 trunks and have much more storage than a trike. You can easily fit car tires on a Spyder - much cheaper and longer lasting.
I hope I provided some food for thought and the vehicle you "graduate" to will give you much enjoyment.
 

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Can Am Spyder's are safer than ANY trike made due to their design. Honda made some small fat wheeled trike's for kids a long time ago and stopped because of the kids having wrecks on them due to instability. Think about it long enough and you'll see. Remember all the wrecks you had as a kid on your tricycle ! :grin .......RICZ is right on everything he said too.
 

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I would think, in my completely unprofessional opinion, the trike with 2 front wheels is more stable because in a curve, it's easier to lift an inside rear when than an inside front wheel (given the rest of the variables are the same). That doesn't mean your 2 rear-wheel trike isn't stable, clearly it is. Only saying that the 2 wheels in front might be more stable.
 

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Spyders have a nanny that when a front wheel gets off the ground, it won't let you add more throttle. Like I said, it prevents stupid.
 

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I would think, in my completely unprofessional opinion, the trike with 2 front wheels is more stable because in a curve, it's easier to lift an inside rear when than an inside front wheel (given the rest of the variables are the same). That doesn't mean your 2 rear-wheel trike isn't stable, clearly it is. Only saying that the 2 wheels in front might be more stable.
I see, now. It makes perfect sense.
 

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I'm thinking that there are enough used Victory Cross bikes and used Victory Cross bike parts to keep one running just fine well beyond the life expectancy of anyone plus their offspring associated with these forums. The Cross bike BenD just had done is beautiful and I'd take that well before an H-D Tri Glide or a GW conversion.

But I'm curious, just what does someone expect won't be available for a Cross bike that would turn it into yard art?
 

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Other option

Read a couple short articles lately about another new option. Yamaha has just come out with a new street 3-wheeler. Guess what 2 wheels in front for stability and one in back. It is suppose to handle pretty good and it leans over almost like a regular two wheeled motorcycle. It runs two sets of forks in the front. Kind of funky looking to me, but hay if it keeps a person riding and they feel more stable on it(safer) more power to them. ....Also remember the old ATC three wheelers they use to sell? The government outlawed the sale of them for a reason. Now all you see for off road is the four-wheeled vehicles or two wheel dirtbikes. Yes I had some fun on the old three wheeler ATCs years ago, but personally I preferred the traditional two wheeled dirt bike off road. Never had a bad accident on the ATCs, but yes I tipped them up on two wheels and almost rolled or flipped and oh yes at first ride I do remember that rear tire climbing my leg when I put my foot down. Good and bad to every design out there. Enjoy what you get and try to make the best of it while you can.
 

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Read a couple short articles lately about another new option. Yamaha has just come out with a new street 3-wheeler. Guess what 2 wheels in front for stability and one in back. It is suppose to handle pretty good and it leans over almost like a regular two wheeled motorcycle. It runs two sets of forks in the front. Kind of funky looking to me, but hay if it keeps a person riding and they feel more stable on it(safer) more power to them. ....Also remember the old ATC three wheelers they use to sell? The government outlawed the sale of them for a reason. Now all you see for off road is the four-wheeled vehicles or two wheel dirtbikes. Yes I had some fun on the old three wheeler ATCs years ago, but personally I preferred the traditional two wheeled dirt bike off road. Never had a bad accident on the ATCs, but yes I tipped them up on two wheels and almost rolled or flipped and oh yes at first ride I do remember that rear tire climbing my leg when I put my foot down. Good and bad to every design out there. Enjoy what you get and try to make the best of it while you can.
@Speedblue makes some good points.

The classic trikes are akin to the three-wheel ATVs that were prone to tip-overs. Mind you, we're talking about when being ridden in a spirited manner, when that single front wheel, the one that's guiding the rig, is subject to being "plowed." On three-wheelers like the Spyder, those two steering wheels aren't subject to being pushed like that. Relatedly, they are outboard of the rest of the bike; I realize that on a classic trike, so are the two back wheels, but they're not the ones guiding the bike along.

Of course, if you're riding a classic trike in a more leisurely manner, this is not a big deal. I realize that thousands of trikers don't have any problems, so part of the analysis of going that route involves whether you still like to push things on occasion.

Regarding the leaning three-wheelers -- and by that I mean leaning like a regular bike -- Piaggio has been selling those MP3 models for a decade or so. I rented one back in 2008, when my wife and I were on vacation. Here's the passenger pretending to be the pilot:



We used this mostly for putting around town, and I will say that it was especially nice in gravel parking lots, and also at stop lights: there's a button that you push when coming to a stop -- you have to be going less than some slow MPH -- and it locks the leaning ability of the forks. Thus, no foot-down requirements when you do stop. And as soon as you throttle up and get going an MPH or two or three, the forks automatically unlock.

The downside of the MP3s -- there's a few, with different size engines -- is that the biggest engine is, I think, 500cc, with not a lot of oomph. And they're scooters -- twist and go -- if anyone requires the visceral fun of shifting. Last, as you can see, there's not a lot of room to stretch out. I'm on my second Burgman 650 scooter now, and they have almost as much stretch-out room as an XCT.

Yamaha has the Niken, new this year (not me, not my photo):



(If you want to learn more about that, Google Yamaha Niken Reviews, and you'll find a lot of articles.)

The Niken is a similar leaning machine, like an MP3, but:

- Much more expensive.
- Has a 900-ish cc three-cylinder engine with a lot of oomph, same as they use on a regular bike.
- Has to be shifted like a regular bike.
- Does NOT have the lock-the-fork-lean like an MP3 -- it can tip over when stopped, just like a regular bike.
- Is a feet-back sportbike-position deal -- no stretching out here.

My buddy and I are going on an Edelweiss Alps tour this August. He's booked one of those big BMW GS bikes, and coincidentally I've booked a Niken (which is why I've been reading up on them).

So the Niken, without stretch-out room and without any stay-up-at-a-stop trickery, may not really have much to offer us old folks, with aging hips and knees. (That's me, but I'll take a lot of Tylenol for that week.) By all accounts, however, it should be a lot of fun in the twisties.
 

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Not all Spyders are the popular RT touring model....here's my F3 Limited.........
 

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Not all Spyders are the popular RT touring model....here's my F3 Limited.........

Man, I love the looks of that Spyder!!!
 

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