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I started a tread 2 weeks ago concerning the blacked out version of the XC. I really do prefer that look but now that I'm aware that it does not have all of the niceties that the chromed version has, I'm thinking about adding some of them back onto the bike. I most certainly will add a radio and cruise control. What's you opinion on ABS brakes? I've never owned a bike with ABS brakes. Those who have had both, is it that much of a safety issue not to have them?
 

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If you have been trained without ABS you know how to brake. ABS is ok until you have to have it worked on then it gets expensive. I have a bike with and a bike without. I really do not like the feeling of hitting it hard to start to slide and it does not, then the pumping starts and you hope like hell the brakes stop you. Old school brakes is the way I was taught. You hit let off and pump them. ABS does not like you to do that. Steady pressure till you stop. Added cost to buy and up keep. The pads do not last no longer. Pros and cons, pro nice in the rain less sliding to a stop. con is cost when you have to have it worked on. Just my opinion.
 

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I started a tread 2 weeks ago concerning the blacked out version of the XC. I really do prefer that look but now that I'm aware that it does not have all of the niceties that the chromed version has, I'm thinking about adding some of them back onto the bike. I most certainly will add a radio and cruise control. What's you opinion on ABS brakes? I've never owned a bike with ABS brakes. Those who have had both, is it that much of a safety issue not to have them?
Yes, it can be a very big safety issue not to have them.

I've been riding for nearly 4 decades, most of which has been without the aid of ABS. And for most of those years I've done just fine without it.

One year I was tooling down the road and a bus stopped suddenly for no apparent reason. Not wanting to be rear ended, I moved onto the shoulder and applied the brakes. There was still a fine silt on the shoulder and the front immediately skidded. I released them as quickly as I could and tried to save it, but the bike flopped around and spit me off just before it planted itself up the bus' butt.

Had I been on my other bike that had ABS, it would have been a drama free event. Instead, it was $5k or repairs to the bike and some points on my license for failure to control.

If it is an option, I'd highly recommend it. You wont even notice they exist unless you are hard on the binders in a panic situation. And we humans can act peculiar when we panic. Computers don't get ruffled, they just do their thing...
 

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This isn't the first thread I have read where the OP is considering buying the bike with the paint he likes while considering adding mods that are packaged on bikes he does not like.

I have done mods to motorcycles for S&G so I can understand doing it the way you want to but...
Assuming that the options you want are packaged in a factory model, you might consider buying that model regardless of color, preferably a new leftover so you get a savings on the front end for a machine that is the same as a current model year except for paint, and then have it painted and trimmed to whatever scheme you want. It's a math problem. How much is doing it the one way versus the other? Used to be paint was cheaper but times change and often the payoff is in doing it the way you want to.

As far as ABS goes, if it did not come on the motorcycle then retrofitting it, while possible, is at the far end of what is worth doing. Much expense, multiple systems involved and the likelihood of a painless commissioning is slim.

OTOH there is a vocal group of riders who prosthelytize ABS like it's the second coming and that it is a game changer. It came on my bike so I have it. If it didn't come on my bike I would have the bike without it. Smart people tell me that it's a resale adder but I ain't selling so no benefit there. I don't doubt that properties inherent in ABS could save my life in specific conditions. The list of things that land in the "save my life in specific conditions" category is long and most of them include the words "and don't ride motorcycles".

Chew your food twenty times and don't ride motorcycles.
Crack your knuckles and you'll get arthritis and don't ride motorcycles.

ABS is in the "but if you do" subcategory.

Don't ride motorcycles but if you do ride motorcycles, ride motorcycles with ABS.
 

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I also go into the "No." crowd.

Its just another thing to break. Also, I really hate the sensitivity of the Victory ABS. Bumpy roads are common here. I feel the ABS unnecessarily kick on a bunch. I do not like it.
 

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Age old question in the MC biz but -
Absolutely YES. Would not even consider a MC without ABS, I don't care it costs more $ It's worth it. *Cheaper than a visit to the emergency room. *41 years and , 820,000+ MC miles ridden. 12 years a MC instructor, all without an accident yet I ride ATGATT. Yes I know how to use my brakes but I am not better than the ABS is and can't control my fellow drivers on the road or the damn deer in my area. Used my ABS the first week I got my XCT coming home when a deer jumped out in front of me. Revolvers over automags also... Oh, thats a different argument... LOL...
 

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If it is an option, I'd highly recommend it. You wont even notice they exist unless you are hard on the binders in a panic situation. And we humans can act peculiar when we panic. Computers don't get ruffled, they just do their thing...


I too would recommend it if it is an option, Had it on my Road Glide, and traveling I-285 in Atlanta, I was glad to have it on more than one occasion.
 

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IMO...I think ABS is more beneficial to a unexperience rider. Having said that I have about 10 years of riding under my belt (which is nothing compared to many of the guys on this forum) and would only buy a bike that has ABS. It's potentially saved my bacon a couple times over the past few years.
 

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As far as I know if your bike doesn't come with ABS you can not add it later.

More riders crash cause we have been trained in a breaking situation put your foot on the break to stop. On motorcycle you have to use the front break first. Putting your foot on the break first will lock up your rear wheel you'll go into a slid and crash.
Always ride with two fingers on the front break lever it will add twenty seconds or more to your life.
If you go on a group ride watch the guy in front of you if he always use the rear break stay a way from him
 

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I don't yet own a victory, nor do I own a bike with ABS. My opinions therefore are based on what the systems do, and comments from those I know with ABS equipped bikes.

Bikes, like cars before them, have been around for a very long time without ABS, people for the most part, managed to stop just fine. ABS comes out and the two camps emerge, one says ABS is for jokers that don't know how to brake properly, the other says it's the greatest thing since trojan ultrathins. Ultimately it became a selling point for the manufacturers and a requirement by legislation. Bike ABS is in the two camps stage right now but there are already states pushing for laws to require it on all new bikes. It will happen eventually, that's just how it is.

Regarding function. ABS has proven itself on motorcycles to be an extremely effect system in the event of a reduced traction panic braking situation. Both in the lab and in real world testing the results have shown shorter stopping distances and fewer wheel lock induced crashes. The simple fact is that a computer is able to monitor and react to wheel spin/lock with much greater accuracy and with much less delay than a person can. So while pumping the brakes is an effective method for a person to control a low traction brake scenario, a computer can manage it better to maximize braking and thus shorten the stopping distance. That all said, ABS will absolutely prove to be a safety enhancing option IF you need it. In my 14 years of riding I've only ever had 3 instances where abs might have helped me. Two resulted in minor tipovers with minimal damage to me or the bike, the third was dramatic but the results were nothing more than dirty underwear.

Friends that have ABS equipped bikes have told me that it's great. Simply hamfist the brake lever and the bike stops regardless of the situation. While I can appreciate that level of braking confidence to me it seems a great way to lose one's skills over time and end up in a bad place if/when riding a bike without it.

On motorcycle you have to use the front break first. Putting your foot on the break first will lock up your rear wheel you'll go into a slid and crash.
Always ride with two fingers on the front break lever it will add twenty seconds or more to your life.
If you go on a group ride watch the guy in front of you if he always use the rear break stay a way from him
As a former MSF coach I can't tell you how refreshing it is to see a comment like this on a cruiser oriented forum. No offense to anyone here but the nonsense about the front brake being dangerous or causing crashes along with the even worse line of "I had to lay it down to save it" makes me shake my head in bewilderment. That's a rant for another day though.
 

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As a former MSF coach I can't tell you how refreshing it is to see a comment like this on a cruiser oriented forum. No offense to anyone here but the nonsense about the front brake being dangerous or causing crashes along with the even worse line of "I had to lay it down to save it" makes me shake my head in bewilderment. That's a rant for another day though.
The front brakes are not dangerous on our bikes, mostly just ineffective. Unlike sportbikes and standards which if braked hard will lift the rear tire off the ground making the rear brake useless for anything except putting the bike into a nice tail slapper when it comes back into contact; the cruiser rear brake adds real bite to braking. It's no surprise that older cruiser riders came to depend on their rear brake.

If you're coming off something sportier, you'll likely be adjusting the way you brake. Together our brakes work fine, but chances are, they ain't what you're used to. You might be surprised to find the rear the better of the two and without ABS, a lot easier to skid around on without falling down.
 

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The front brakes are not dangerous on our bikes, mostly just ineffective. Unlike sportbikes and standards which if braked hard will lift the rear tire off the ground making the rear brake useless for anything except putting the bike into a nice tail slapper when it comes back into contact; the cruiser rear brake adds real bite to braking. It's no surprise that older cruiser riders came to depend on their rear brake.

If you're coming off something sportier, you'll likely be adjusting the way you brake. Together our brakes work fine, but chances are, they ain't what you're used to. You might be surprised to find the rear the better of the two and without ABS, a lot easier to skid around on without falling down.
IMO there is no such thing as a dangerous front brake, only poorly trained riders who believe that.

I tend to adjust my riding style to suit the bike I'm on. My aprilia's for instance, have damn good brakes to begin with and with the mods I've done to one of them (radial calipers and m/c and braided lines) they're flat out insane. My 919 on the other hand, has junk for front brakes despite swapping CBR F4i calipers on and adding braided lines. It make sense then that the mille rear brake is essentially useless, locking up long before it provides any effective braking. It's only good for holding me still once stopped. The 919 though, I use the rear brake pretty much all the time or it's just not going to stop.

Being a 700+ lb bike I expect that I'm going to need every bit of braking power I can find once I get my XR. Not sure if they come with braided lines from the factory or not but if not that will be a very early mod along with some HH or better rated pads. I still don't expect to stop on a dime given the heft of the bike but there's always room for improvement.
 

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IMO there is no such thing as a dangerous front brake, only poorly trained riders who believe that.

I tend to adjust my riding style to suit the bike I'm on. My aprilia's for instance, have damn good brakes to begin with and with the mods I've done to one of them (radial calipers and m/c and braided lines) they're flat out insane. My 919 on the other hand, has junk for front brakes despite swapping CBR F4i calipers on and adding braided lines. It make sense then that the mille rear brake is essentially useless, locking up long before it provides any effective braking. It's only good for holding me still once stopped. The 919 though, I use the rear brake pretty much all the time or it's just not going to stop.

Being a 700+ lb bike I expect that I'm going to need every bit of braking power I can find once I get my XR. Not sure if they come with braided lines from the factory or not but if not that will be a very early mod along with some HH or better rated pads. I still don't expect to stop on a dime given the heft of the bike but there's always room for improvement.
When new, the pads are very wooden. They break in well though. I have some EBC HH pads I bought for it a long time ago, but since the OEM pads have bedded in, they're a lot better, hence I haven't gotten around to installing the EBCs.

Which Priller you ridin? Were you sad to see Max retire? What the hell happened to WSBK on Speed? Where's my beer?
 

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When new, the pads are very wooden. They break in well though. I have some EBC HH pads I bought for it a long time ago, but since the OEM pads have bedded in, they're a lot better, hence I haven't gotten around to installing the EBCs.

Which Priller you ridin? Were you sad to see Max retire? What the hell happened to WSBK on Speed? Where's my beer?
There's no such thing as brakes that are too good so if EBC makes HH pads for these bikes i can promise you I'll have them on there soon after I make a purchase regardless of the stock pads capabilities. I just like knowing that when I need to stop, I will.

I have a few actually. 2001 RSV Mille is my baby and has more mods than most people can even spot (my mods are built with an eye towards clean and subtle, if you don't know what the bike is supposed to look like, most won't catch your eye), a "2002" mille built from spare parts off the first Mille and others that I collected over a period of about a year. A 2002 Futura which just found a buyer last night to make room for a victory, a 2000 RS250 which also recently sold since I haven't ridden it in a couple years, a 2001 RS50 also heavily modded and used for pit bike duty, and another '01 RS50 parts bike.

Not at all sad to see biaggi retire. He's an amazing rider no doubt but an absolute child on and off the track. He does nothing to endear himself to other riders or to fans. Camier, on the other hand, is a proper gentleman of the sport. I had the pleasure of getting his autograph at WSBK Miller in 2012 despite the fact that he was bombarded with fans and had a busted wrist that he was trying to sign with.

WSBK is no longer carried on SPEED. BeIN sports has it (available through comcast and direct tv I believe, not sure who else has it) You can also sign up for WSBK Videopass for just shy of $100 for the season. Live streaming of all SBK and SS races plus superpole. Also has all the complete races available on demand. I just signed up last week so I haven't tried the streaming yet but the on demand works fine.

No idea where you beer is, sorry man cheers
 

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I have a few actually. 2001 RSV Mille is my baby and has more mods than most people can even spot (my mods are built with an eye towards clean and subtle, if you don't know what the bike is supposed to look like, most won't catch your eye), a "2002" mille built from spare parts off the first Mille and others that I collected over a period of about a year. A 2002 Futura which just found a buyer last night to make room for a victory, a 2000 RS250 which also recently sold since I haven't ridden it in a couple years, a 2001 RS50 also heavily modded and used for pit bike duty, and another '01 RS50 parts bike.
I've known a couple peeps who've owned them and they seem like really great bikes. No support for them in my area, so I just admire.

Not at all sad to see biaggi retire. He's an amazing rider no doubt but an absolute child on and off the track. He does nothing to endear himself to other riders or to fans. Camier, on the other hand, is a phttp://www.victoryforums.com/images/victoryforums/editor/menupop.gif.pagespeed.ce.8ogNg8molM.gifroper gentleman of the sport. I had the pleasure of getting his autograph at WSBK Miller in 2012 despite the fact that he was bombarded with fans and had a busted wrist that he was trying to sign with.
I'm a Duc guy, but I found him entertaining.

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=biaggi+wheelie&FORM=VIRE5#view=detail&mid=E012A75E705BF18FA5AEE012A75E705BF18FA5AE

WSBK is no longer carried on SPEED. BeIN sports has it (available through comcast and direct tv I believe, not sure who else has it) You can also sign up for WSBK Videopass for just shy of $100 for the season. Live streaming of all SBK and SS races plus superpole. Also has all the complete races available on demand. I just signed up last week so I haven't tried the streaming yet but the on demand works fine.
Ahh, very good information. Don't have the TV providers you mention, but I do got a pooter.

No idea where you beer is, sorry man cheers
Iz awright. Got more in the fridge anyway.
 

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I'm not an ABS fan. That said, they have a place and function and are overall a good thing. I just don't care for them.
No, adding ABS after the fact is really not cost effective.
This thing is out on the market, http://www.tcbbrakesystems.com/ , but I have no idea if or really how it works. Sounds kinda Voo-Doo ish to me, and not the Witchdoctor's kind of it either.
Practice, practice, practice, then practice some more would be the advice of the day. I would suggest that of anyone despite the tools or gadgets you may have.
The best "safety" device on any machine is the one between your ears.
Enjoy the new ride. cheers
 

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I've been riding on the highway since 1979. My last bike was a Suzuki Hayabusa I rode as a sport touring machine.. Bike before that was a Suzuki Bandit 1200s that ended up under the front of a Park Avenue when a 91 year old driver turned in front of me in a residential section. Broke collarbone, broke ribs, etc..

When I shopped for a new bike I had three criteria that I felt would be an improvement over the Busa.
1. ABS brakes
2. Cruise control
3. Radio or stereo system.
I was not willing to short myself on any of these, if I had been I would be riding a Honda F6B - no cruise shot that deal right out of the water.

You can still ride these bikes just like they don't have ABS, but its nice to know when the buick turns in front of you that you can hammer the brakes and still control the bike around the obstacle...
 

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As a former MSF coach I can't tell you how refreshing it is to see a comment like this on a cruiser oriented forum. No offense to anyone here but the nonsense about the front brake being dangerous or causing crashes along with the even worse line of "I had to lay it down to save it" makes me shake my head in bewilderment. That's a rant for another day though.


You must of read my post with one eye closed.
Front breaks stop you.
Rear breaks locks up your wheel and will put you in a slid and yes crash
 
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