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Added the tuner today and the vented side cover on the airbox.. This bike runs hard!!! I'm surprised every time I twist the throttle. Already had performance slip on mufflers.
 

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Congrats!!! What tuner did you go with?

Now all you need is cams!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Congrats!!! What tuner did you go with?

Now all you need is cams!!!
Naaa my bike is a daily rider being my primary transportation so I'm keeping the internals factory.
I added this tuner.

You did get the bike dyno tuned with the programmer correct?
No why would I get a dyno tune for that tuner and mufflers?? Seems way excessive.
The bike did have a slight surging at 65-75mph cruising that's now gone.
I'm going to pull the plugs when it cools to see how it looks.
The bike pulls like a freight train. I'm shocked when I twist it!!!
 

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Seems pretty basic from the manual:

TUNING
We suggest that you set your pots to the setting that best matches your bikes modification. Further
adjustments can be made by first having your bike fully warmed up. Then with a screwdriver in hand,
locate the green light and the pot right below it. Raise the RPM up to a high idle or about 1800-RPM if
you have a Tach. Once there, slowly turn the green pot clockwise from the 1:00 position (or off) until you
achieve the highest RPM and smoothest running sound (just like you would if you had a mixture screw on
a carburetor). You should find that the best setting is between 2:30 and 4:30.
Next locate the yellow light and the pot below it. This pot adjustment acts as an accelerator pump
adjustment. Anytime you see the light on, it means that this pot is adding fuel. You will notice that you
can take the RPM slowly up to 3000-4000 in neutral and see no yellow light. But whack the throttle wide
open
quickly and you see the yellow light come on. Try to add as much as you can until the bike says it is
too much then back off two clock positions. This yellow pot adds most of its fuel below 4000 RPM and
full throttle acceleration.
The red light pot is your for main jet. It adds about 5 points of a main jet for every clock position.
Example: one clock position is the same as 170 to 175 main jet. All we can say about setting up this pot is
use the base setting that comes closest to your bikes modifications. Then use the same method you used,
setting up your carbureted bikes.
 

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No why would I get a dyno tune for that tuner and mufflers?? Seems way excessive.
The bike did have a slight surging at 65-75mph cruising that's now gone.
I'm going to pull the plugs when it cools to see how it looks.
The bike pulls like a freight train. I'm shocked when I twist it!!!
Because you have absolutely no clue what your air/fuel ratio is. That tuner only enriches the mixture, it does not lean it out. You don't know if your bike is already rich in some parts of the rpm band and you may be making it worse.

Go to a reputable dyno tuner with a wideband O2 sensor and have them dyno tune it before you damage your engine anymore than you may already have. Pray your base tune isn't overly rich already before you get there and won't need a Power Commander 3 to lean out the a/f ratio.

The only way to put a tuner on a Victory and just call it good without a dyno tune with a wideband O2 is if you have a 2008+ bike and the tuner is a Power Commander 5 with AutoTune.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Seems pretty basic from the manual:

TUNING
We suggest that you set your pots to the setting that best matches your bikes modification. Further
adjustments can be made by first having your bike fully warmed up. Then with a screwdriver in hand,
locate the green light and the pot right below it. Raise the RPM up to a high idle or about 1800-RPM if
you have a Tach. Once there, slowly turn the green pot clockwise from the 1:00 position (or off) until you
achieve the highest RPM and smoothest running sound (just like you would if you had a mixture screw on
a carburetor). You should find that the best setting is between 2:30 and 4:30.
Next locate the yellow light and the pot below it. This pot adjustment acts as an accelerator pump
adjustment. Anytime you see the light on, it means that this pot is adding fuel. You will notice that you
can take the RPM slowly up to 3000-4000 in neutral and see no yellow light. But whack the throttle wide
open
quickly and you see the yellow light come on. Try to add as much as you can until the bike says it is
too much then back off two clock positions. This yellow pot adds most of its fuel below 4000 RPM and
full throttle acceleration.
The red light pot is your for main jet. It adds about 5 points of a main jet for every clock position.
Example: one clock position is the same as 170 to 175 main jet. All we can say about setting up this pot is
use the base setting that comes closest to your bikes modifications. Then use the same method you used,
setting up your carbureted bikes.
I did it just like the book (this example shows). Easy to do.

Because you have absolutely no clue what your air/fuel ratio is. That tuner only enriches the mixture, it does not lean it out. You don't know if your bike is already rich in some parts of the rpm band and you may be making it worse.

Go to a reputable dyno tuner with a wideband O2 sensor and have them dyno tune it before you damage your engine anymore than you may already have. Pray your base tune isn't overly rich already before you get there and won't need a Power Commander 3 to lean out the a/f ratio.

The only way to put a tuner on a Victory and just call it good without a dyno tune with a wideband O2 is if you have a 2008+ bike and the tuner is a Power Commander 5 with AutoTune.
Being a little dramatic don't you think? What did you base that statement off of?

Before the tuner the plugs were light tan to off white now they are dark tan. Exactly like they should be. Before was a slight lean condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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Normally people that come across as "dramatic" when offer advice have good reason. Most often it's because they have history with similar issues or have seen the results of DIY gone bad.

Bottom line is that people don't usually offer advice just to tick other people off.
 

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I did it just like the book (this example shows). Easy to do.



Being a little dramatic don't you think? What did you base that statement off of?

Before the tuner the plugs were light tan to off white now they are dark tan. Exactly like they should be. Before was a slight lean condition.
If you ever look at a fuel map on one of the fancy boxes, you will see they have a large matrix of settings based on throttle position and rpm. Presumably, a well paid tuner could fill in all the boxes just right to provide you a perfect 14.7 a/f ratio (or whatever the magic number is) in virtually every conceivable scenario.

I have a such a fancy box on my FJR with a map done by someone who had it professionally created for a stock setup and it works pretty well in the mid and high rpm ranges. But I really didn't purchase it for power. I bought it to try and take out lurchiness when finessing the throttle near its closed position. I had to manually add a whole lot more fuel at that end of the spectrum of the "professionally tuned" map to tame that annoying tendency a tad.

I had a tuner similar to yours on my Warrior and it worked fine with a few screws and a little experimentation. I don't mind running these air-cooled beasts a little on the rich side anyway.

Fortunately, the XR with Stage 1 runs like a champ everywhere. About the only fun I have tinkering with it is sawing on the windscreen to try and completely eliminate buffeting. I suppose Victory had to leave me some minor challenges for days that it snows...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Normally people that come across as "dramatic" when offer advice have good reason. Most often it's because they have history with similar issues or have seen the results of DIY gone bad.

Bottom line is that people don't usually offer advice just to tick other people off.
Agreed but a blanket statement like " have them dyno tune it before you damage your engine anymore than you may already have" is dramatic.

If you ever look at a fuel map on one of the fancy boxes, you will see they have a large matrix of settings based on throttle position and rpm. Presumably, a well paid tuner could fill in all the boxes just right to provide you a perfect 14.7 a/f ratio (or whatever the magic number is) in virtually every conceivable scenario.

I have a such a fancy box on my FJR with a map done by someone who had it professionally created for a stock setup and it works pretty well in the mid and high rpm ranges. But I really didn't purchase it for power. I bought it to try and take out lurchiness when finessing the throttle near its closed position. I had to manually add a whole lot more fuel at that end of the spectrum of the "professionally tuned" map to tame that annoying tendency a tad.

I had a tuner similar to yours on my Warrior and it worked fine with a few screws and a little experimentation. I don't mind running these air-cooled beasts a little on the rich side anyway.
Fortunately, the XR with Stage 1 runs like a champ everywhere. About the only fun I have tinkering with it is sawing on the windscreen to try and completely eliminate buffeting. I suppose Victory had to leave me some minor challenges for days that it snows...
Here in Phoenix 110+ summers it's not a bad idea.
 

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Being a little dramatic don't you think? What did you base that statement off of?
It's called being brutally honest. I'm basing it off of lots of bad choices that I've seen people make by skimping out on doing something correctly to save a buck.

It's nice that your checking your plugs but we've made a lot of advances in technology since the way things were done in the 1950's.

It's your bike so do what you want.
 

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It's called being brutally honest. I'm basing it off of lots of bad choices that I've seen people make by skimping out on doing something correctly to save a buck.

It's nice that your checking your plugs but we've made a lot of advances in technology since the way things were done in the 1950's.

It's your bike so do what you want.
I guess I was wrong, you aren't dramatic.
Take a deep breath it isn't that bad. thumb up
 

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It's called being brutally honest. I'm basing it off of lots of bad choices that I've seen people make by skimping out on doing something correctly to save a buck.

It's nice that your checking your plugs but we've made a lot of advances in technology since the way things were done in the 1950's.
I had a carbureted Kawasaki made in this very Millennium that had better fuel delivery than any of the FI bikes I've owned. It did get touchy when I removed its air-box snorkel though.
 

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I changed the 4th pot to 8:00 on advise from a P.M. Vics like the red pot to come on a little later.

I checked the green and actually it's at 2:30. The bike was fully warmed up so I reset using the approximately 1500-1800 rpm and advancing it until the motor starts to sound different. 2:30 is it. 3:00 it's bogging down. Yellow is still at 4 and 3 on the red.
 

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Naaa my bike is a daily rider being my primary transportation so I'm keeping the internals factory.
I added this tuner.


No why would I get a dyno tune for that tuner and mufflers?? Seems way excessive.
The bike did have a slight surging at 65-75mph cruising that's now gone.
I'm going to pull the plugs when it cools to see how it looks.
The bike pulls like a freight train. I'm shocked when I twist it!!!
just from my experience, to read a plug no matter where its in... WOT, then shut down while at WOT..then read the plug !
Should be a light gray to dark....but oh well, WE HAVE 2012 ( almost ) so a REAL TUNE is the way to go !
Just sayin......
 

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Rock on Vin.

I used a Doebeck box on a Suzuki i had several years ago. I dialed it in at the numbers recommended. Being that I've done a lot of this before, and never had much money, I bought a set of wide band sensors (heated). i used a volt meter strapped to the handlebars to check AFR. The settings that I had were a tad rich in most places, and really rich on the top end. I looked at the specs at the time and it seams like 13.5/1 was about 400mV. Again that's from memory. Don't take it to the bank.
 

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Anyone interested in giving a new victory (First EFI too) a primer on what tuners are?

I have a 2005 V92TC with D&D exhaust... everything else seems stock engine/exhaust related...
 

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Anyone interested in giving a new victory (First EFI too) a primer on what tuners are?

I have a 2005 V92TC with D&D exhaust... everything else seems stock engine/exhaust related...
It's an electronic device that allows you to adjust the metering of fuel of your machine.

There is a sweet spot of air to fuel where engines run the best. When people change their pipes, cams, air-filters, the air/fuel ratio changes.

To compensate for the change, people add the "tuner." Many spend big $$$ getting the bike professionally tuned i.e. the mechanic spends a lot of time fiddling with all the possible throttle positions and rpm values to get a highly optimized machine.

Some people wing it. If your run too rich (higher fuel to air) you'll foul your plugs. If you run to lean (higher air to fuel) your engine will run hot. Heat kills.

The EPA forces manufacturers to run the bikes lean to meet emissions/fuel economy standards. You may read about new machines running very hot and annoying their owners, or having machines that lurch at low throttle openings, or engines that pop excessively.

Some people add tuners just to correct such issues. Most do it because they can wring a little more power out of their engines.

Victory has their own maps they can enter into your machine's Electronic Control Unit (ECU). This serves the same purpose as a tuner.

Your older Vic may have carbs. If so, you change the air/fuel mix by changing the carb jets.
 

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Thanks Saddlebag, great answer. Understood.

As far as my bike goes... well... I have not actually looked too close but the previous owner indicated it was EFI and called the "choke" the fast idle lever and said never give it gas while starting it...

But, like I said... I have not confirmed this. I will spend sometime in the garage tonight going over it with a fine tooth comb, some mothers and a bib to catch the drool.
 
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