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Discussion Starter #1
I hit 10k miles on my XR a few weeks back and to celebrate I got her a new set of E3's installed. I also picked up an air filter, oil filter kit, and new spark plugs. I have taken the tanks off of a few different bikes but not my XR and I have watched WD's video on how to remove it plus read all the warnings about avoiding breaking the plastic fuel nipple. My question is there enough "slack" to just take off the tank mounting bolts and slide it back far enough to just change the air filter without disconnecting the fuel and electric lines? I am replacing it with another stock paper filter.
 

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I don't think there is enough room to do this but perhaps others will disagree.

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Get yourself comfortable with taking off the tank. It's not as delicate a procedure as you have been lead to believe. You can do it. Just take your time and carefully follow those instructions from the WD video. The most difficult part is getting the fuel line separated from the FI, the release buttons are tough to grip and pinch.
I've had the tank off 4 times in the last 2 years - twice to clean the "performance" air filter, once to remove the horse-shoe spacer and once to put it back on. (tank wobbled without it)
The dealer has had the tank off at least 3 times that I know of - once to put the "performance" air filter in and twice to replace the fuel sending unit.
All without incident.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the words of encouragement Johnny! Breaking that fuel nipple has me dreading do this job. I have taken the tank off of my Suzuki M50 numerous times without incident and it is pretty much the same except it had a brass fuel nipple. Going riding tomorrow and going to try and get home with the least amount of fuel possible to lighten it up. The dealer couldn't believe I was going to put in another OEM filter and not a high performance one when I bought it the other day.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Disconnecting the fuel line connection is no big deal, like I said I have done it on two other fuel injected motorcycles numerous times, its getting the cheap plastic fuel nipple caught and breaking it is the worry. Took me 3.5 years to put on 10k miles so at this pace it will be a while before I change it again. Taking Friday off to do this, the oil change, brakes on my truck, and replacing the pump in my hydro static lawn mower transmission. Should be a fun day with a few choice words thrown in there.
 
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Pull side covers off, remove seat, remove rear tank bolts, and slide tank back. Changing the stock filter doesn't require tank removal, there is enough room to get to the filter under the tank front. You still need to be careful though.
 
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Just curious, why not get the Lloyds air filter? If your exhaust and the engine/timing etc. are still stock, you're right, the Lloyd's filter could lean it out too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just curious, why not get the Lloyds air filter? If your exhaust and the engine/timing etc. are still stock, you're right, the Lloyd's filter could lean it out too much.
I am still stock and I am happy with the bike how it is. It is strange for me because I have done engine mods to every car/truck/motorcycle I have ever owned. I had every intention of doing the PCV/filter/timing gear when my 5 year warranty is up but I have changed my mind in the last year or so. In my 3.5 years on the bike I have never ran into a situation where I wished my bike had more power.
 

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Don't worry about taking the tank the tank off....just take your time and don't be ham fisted and you'll be fine. After the first few times it's a breeze.
 

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Just ordered them there fancy needle nose plier looking things. I have had the tank off a few times on mine since buying it in January. I did install the Victory performance filter as mine looked like had been in the desert or something for it short 2500 mile life. I managed to tape a couple small nuts to a pair of needle nose pliers to depress the clamp. but it was fiddly. So for $10 I'll skip lunch out one week.
 

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TNXR

I take my tank off at least once a year to redo the performance air filter and have changed the fuel filter. I remove the tank bolts and then shove some foam or a board under the tank end to elevate in order to get my hand in to squeeze the fuel nipple and remove the line. I think guys break the nipple off if they don't raise the back of the tank when they pull it towards the seat when removing the tank nipple hits the frame? Watch out the tank bolt rubber spacers don't fall down the frame hole????? The special pliers would be a great idea.

You have to make sure when reinstalling the hose on the nipple it clicks in place or it could come off when riding. No problem just go easy.:grin

I have also cut the tie holding the fuel line to the frame and taken the hose off at the fuel rail then replace tie. Take a pic first.
 

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From Foto Joe

To my great surprise and astonishment somebody once again in engineering didn't spend their day with their head shoved up a warm dark orifice and actually gave some thought to changing this out of the way filter. All that is needed is a pair of dykes to snip one wire tie and the tank can now be slid back far enough to access the air filter without disconnecting any lines other than an electrical connection near the rear of the tank. Once the air filter was replaced it was a simple job to slide the tank forward again, replace the wire tie and reconnect the electrics.

The only hiccup I hit was neglecting to pull the inside grommets off the rear tank mount tabs. I knocked 'em both off when sliding the tank back and one of the little buggers dropped into the frame opening above the suspension where it will remain until the end of time.
 

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Beware the frame hole. If you ever lose something it should always be the first place you look.LOL
 

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you do not need the pliers to put fuel line back on. Just push it on and you should hear a click when it locks into place
 

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Be glad you didn't have to change the air filter on a GL1800 GoldWing.
1. Seat
2. Inner fairing
3. Radio, air filter, gas tank cover
4. Remove radio (on top of air filter)
5. Replace filter and reverse procedure.
 

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Be glad you didn't have to change the air filter on a GL1800 GoldWing.
1. Seat
2. Inner fairing
3. Radio, air filter, gas tank cover
4. Remove radio (on top of air filter)
5. Replace filter and reverse procedure.
Just shows,

Things are never so bad that they can't be worse.:smile
 

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FWIW, I prefer to disconnect the fuel line from behind the right cheese wedge and remove the tank with the line attached. I feel the less I mess with the plastic nipple on the fuel pump the better. I will also add that it's much easier and safer to have a second set of hands for the procedure.
 

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FWIW, I prefer to disconnect the fuel line from behind the right cheese wedge and remove the tank with the line attached. I feel the less I mess with the plastic nipple on the fuel pump the better. I will also add that it's much easier and safer to have a second set of hands for the procedure.
I agree with WeekendRider.

I have used this method and have had no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Got it done this morning, wasn't too bad at all. I disconnected the fuel line from under the tank instead of going the cheese wedge route. Got my neighbor to hold the tank while I removed the fuel line. The biggest problem I ran into was getting the fuel line back on while trying to keep from pushing it at an angle. I can see how that thing is easily broke off. The original filter was fairly clean, probably could have stretched it out to 15k miles if I wanted to.
 
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