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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Air Shock Valve Relocation Video

I needed to relocate my air shock valve in order to accommodate an oversized pressure sensor.

This is a quick, simple and free relocation that only take a couple of minutes.

Click here to watch my video.

Let me know what you think.
Thanks
Paul
 

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EZ-P-ZEE..... Thanks Paul, I use the same pump as you do and may now move my valve just to make it a little easier to get at.
 

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Hey Paul are those wheel sensors always transmitting or do they turn on when the wheels move? I was thinking about doing the same thing but the TPM system I was looking at the sensors turned off at rest so the Shock would not work
 

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Hey Paul are those wheel sensors always transmitting or do they turn on when the wheels move? I was thinking about doing the same thing but the TPM system I was looking at the sensors turned off at rest so the Shock would not work
Yeah they are transmitting all the time, they don't go to sleep.
I was thinking of removing them for winter storage to save on battery life.
I don't know if that would work or not.
 

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I definitely like this idea. What brand of TPMS do you have, I only find systems that have 2 sensors?
 

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Great thanks, I'll look them up.
 

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Thanks Paul, that's quick, easy, cost free and so very clever. You rock these videos!
 

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my question is, how do you actually air up the shock with the sensor there? When you remove and replace it, to access it for adding air, your always going to lose a pound or 2 of pressure, just like when you check the pressure with the gauge, right? Granted a pound or to may not seem like much but in the shocks it can make a difference I think. Wouldn't it make it more useful a set-up if you had a splitter that allowed you to fill with air without removing the sensor? Just some of my thoughts. Great vid though, you do make some useful vids for sure. :smile I used your vid for making my own pvc 1/4 turn throttle. Thanks for that :grin
 

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Good use of your retirement Paul. With all that extra free time can we expect more great videos?
 

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Some Additional Info

1) Paul makes amazingly helpful -- and professional -- videos. And, IMHO, this is another example.

2) Yes, that's a Doran 360M unit: Motorcycle Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems by Doran

I did a lengthy review of this particular TPMS about a year and a half ago for webBikeWorld, here:

Doran 360M TPMS Review - webBikeWorld

I discuss the pros and cons of different methods used by TPMS, and if you're interested in adding one, you may find that write-up useful.

3) Yes, connecting and disconnecting that (or any) pump to the shock will change the reading by a few PSI, because of the brief air loss involved in making or breaking the connection... given the small amount of air in that entire system. So, you can put it 2 or 3 PSI higher than you want it set at, if you like, so that when you disconnect the pump it will be at a precise figure.

Paul's use of a TPMS at least makes it unnecessary to connect the pump or any old gauge, when you just want to check the value (because the TPMS sensor is always connected).

4) Paul alludes to more involved methods of relocating the shock valve, as opposed to his straight-forward change. You might be interested in doing something more elaborate, especially if you don't have a TPMS or if you change the shock values often (for different values in riding two-up vs. solo, twisties vs. superslab, etc.).

MTVic was, I believe, the first to write about his experience; see this post: http://www.victoryforums.com/34-victory-cross-country-cross-roads/59042-quick-ez-way-relocate-shock-filler-nipple.html

Since then, others have followed suit, on either the left side of the bike or the right, using that area underneath the back of the tank (and an extension hose).

I got more complicated, by drilling through the right side cover. See attached pic, and that write up is here:

Adding an External Schrader Valve for the Air Shock on a Victory Cross Country Motorcycle

(For those non-XCT owners wondering why bother with any of this, it turns out that removing the side cover when you have saddlebag guards and passenger mini-boards in place is a limited-clearance nuisance, and likely to scratch the cover or break the barbs.)

5) If you're messing with the side covers, you might want to add some heat-shrink tubing while this is fresh in your mind. I did this -- see attached pic -- for just the upper-forward barbs on each side, based on the post by thumbgone in this thread: http://www.victoryforums.com/35-victory-general-discussion/78906-making-side-covers-stay.html

The covers have a habit of working loose (ask PaiN), and that trick, along with replacing the grommets periodically, is, IMHO, a good idea.

6) Having had the Doran system in place for two riding seasons now, I find that I am actually adding air less than I used to. You get to check the pressure with a single button push, and you notice how just the changes in daily weather affects the PSI. For me, seeing a pound or two change, up and down, quite often, has made me less OCD.

The Doran system is on all the time, or with the ignition only, depending on how you hook it up. No wheel movement is required for activation, but if you wire it with the ignition, you have to wait several minutes for the system to sync itself up. So I have mine hot all the time, but added a master on/off switch to disable it when I don't want it on (e.g., tire changes and during the winter).

Speaking of winter, here's an excerpt of an email exchange I had with Doran over the winter of '14/'15:

Me:

I have a question regarding the 360M system over the winter. I have the system on my motorcycle, which bike just sits in the garage, immobile, and hooked up to a smart charger during the winter months. I have a switch -- in the off position over the winter -- such that the control/display/receiver unit does not receive any power during this time.

My question: does it conserve battery life if the sensors are removed from the valve stems of the two wheels, and placed on a shelf over the winter? Or doesn't it matter, if the main unit is powered off?


Doran:

Great question! Yes, it does help to conserve the battery life of the sensors when you remove them from the valve stem when you're not riding for extended periods of time. If they are left on the valve, the sensors will constantly read tire pressure and attempt to communicate to the monitor. Think of it as a toy being left in the on position; the battery will drain in that toy a lot faster than if the it was switched off every now and then.

Just take the sensors off your bike and store them somewhere safe until you're ready to ride again. It's the best way to ensure maximum battery life.


~~~~~

I hope someone finds some of this information useful.
 

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I relocated mine to the left side of the bike earlier in the year and it is one of the best mods I have done to my XR. I don't need a pressure sensor because I am constantly changing the pressure from riding solo to 2up.
 

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Met a guy in a parking lot this last weekend that had 2013' CCT and the the Doran TPMS. The display unit was a bit bigger than I imagined and to a degree sort of overwhelmed the left side handle bar where it was mounted. I think if I get it I will mount it in the storage space in one of the hard lowers and run the warning light up someplace on the faring.

He was very intrigued with the idea of putting a sensor on the shock!

He also had the sensors for the tires mounted inside the rim, which he said he will change on his next set of tires. First of all he said the sensors have been broken every time the tires were taken on and off and he said he is only getting about 2 years out of the batteries. The unit didn't work because the sensors were dead. He found out after the fact that the sensors continuously transmits.

Regardless of whether I get the TPMS I'm going to relocate the shock fill to an external location for easier access.

Thanks for all the info guys!
 

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...
The display unit was a bit bigger than I imagined and to a degree sort of overwhelmed the left side handle bar where it was mounted. I think if I get it I will mount it in the storage space in one of the hard lowers and run the warning light up someplace on the faring.
...
Regardless of whether I get the TPMS I'm going to relocate the shock fill to an external location for easier access.

Thanks for all the info guys!
The control module is 1.80" wide, 1.97" tall, and 1.50" deep. I guess it depends on how much other crap you have on your bars, in terms of whether it looks too large. Here's a shot of mine (on HeliBars), to the right of some RAM balls and below a RAM GPS mount.

In any case, good luck with your project.
 

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