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Take Action!

Contact your representative today!

In an effort to prohibit the availability of E15, a gasoline formulation that contains up to 15 percent ethanol by volume, the American Motorcyclist Association supports U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte’s (R-Va.) H.R. 1462, the RFS Reform Act of 2013. The bipartisan bill would amend the Renewable Fuel Standard to recognize market conditions and realities. It would also prohibit the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from allowing the introduction into the marketplace of gasoline containing greater than 10 percent of ethanol by volume. In other words, E15 would no longer be permitted if this legislation becomes law.

The AMA has repeatedly expressed concerns to government officials and federal lawmakers about possible damage to motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle engines caused by the inadvertent use of E15 when the new fuel becomes widely available.

In October 2010, the EPA approved E15 for use in model year 2007 and newer light duty vehicles (cars, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles). In January 2011, it added model year 2001-2006 light duty vehicles to the approved list.

This new legislation would help protect the 22 million motorcycle and ATVs in the country – and the riders who depend on their safe operation – from inadvertent misfueling.

Preventing these inadvertent misfuelings has been one of the AMA’s top priorities due to the fact that motorcycles and ATVs aren’t designed to run on ethanol fuel blends higher than 10 percent, and many older machines favored by vintage enthusiasts may have problems with any ethanol in the fuel. In fact, simply using fuel with blends of ethanol over 10 percent could void a vehicle manufacturer’s warranty, potentially leaving motorcyclists with thousands of dollars in additional repair costs.

We need your help to pass H.R. 1462. You can send a prewritten email to your representative immediately by following the "Take Action" option and entering your information. The AMA encourages riders to personalize their messages by drawing on their own personal riding experiences.

Please join the AMA to help us fight for safe access to fuel. More members means more clout against our opponents, and your support will help the AMA fight for your rights – on the road, trail, racetrack, and in the halls of government.

To join, go to AmericanMotorcyclist.com/membership/join.
 

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Hopefully this gets some traction.
 

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I have yet to put ethanol in my bike. And God help me I am trying to never have it in there. There are two gas stations around me that serve 100% real gasoline. If people want to put that crap in their tank, then go ahead, I just wish there were more options for me to fuel up.
 

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Do some more research.... Ethanol should not be put in any internal combustion engine!!!! I am not talking about the harm it does to the engine either. To produce 1 gallon of ethanol blended fuel it doubles the pollution at the refinery. Ethanol fuel is a scam it is harder on the environment than refining regular fuel. Anybody drive a newer diesel pick up or big rig? Every new diesel has some type of bullshit emissions on it... If you remove all the emulsions crap you get 20% better mileage. What is more harmful to the environment using less fuel or not putting out a little black smoke?


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Thanks Travis for the article, it does speak volumes. Ethanol can be made out of almost anything, in South America its made from sugar cane, heck it can even be made out of weeds. I guess we'll see what happens. Ride Safe all, Ride safe..
 

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Take Action!

Contact your representative today!

In an effort to prohibit the availability of E15, a gasoline formulation that contains up to 15 percent ethanol by volume, the American Motorcyclist Association supports U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte’s (R-Va.) H.R. 1462, the RFS Reform Act of 2013. The bipartisan bill would amend the Renewable Fuel Standard to recognize market conditions and realities. It would also prohibit the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from allowing the introduction into the marketplace of gasoline containing greater than 10 percent of ethanol by volume. In other words, E15 would no longer be permitted if this legislation becomes law.

The AMA has repeatedly expressed concerns to government officials and federal lawmakers about possible damage to motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle engines caused by the inadvertent use of E15 when the new fuel becomes widely available.

In October 2010, the EPA approved E15 for use in model year 2007 and newer light duty vehicles (cars, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles). In January 2011, it added model year 2001-2006 light duty vehicles to the approved list.

This new legislation would help protect the 22 million motorcycle and ATVs in the country – and the riders who depend on their safe operation – from inadvertent misfueling.

Preventing these inadvertent misfuelings has been one of the AMA’s top priorities due to the fact that motorcycles and ATVs aren’t designed to run on ethanol fuel blends higher than 10 percent, and many older machines favored by vintage enthusiasts may have problems with any ethanol in the fuel. In fact, simply using fuel with blends of ethanol over 10 percent could void a vehicle manufacturer’s warranty, potentially leaving motorcyclists with thousands of dollars in additional repair costs.

We need your help to pass H.R. 1462. You can send a prewritten email to your representative immediately by following the "Take Action" option and entering your information. The AMA encourages riders to personalize their messages by drawing on their own personal riding experiences.

Please join the AMA to help us fight for safe access to fuel. More members means more clout against our opponents, and your support will help the AMA fight for your rights – on the road, trail, racetrack, and in the halls of government.

To join, go to AmericanMotorcyclist.com/membership/join.
I have no desire to have E-15 in any of my vehicles, a present possibility that already exists but prohibiting anything greater than E-10 will also prohibit E-85. Before we support the ban the wording at the very least needs to be changed to reflect that E-15 cannot be offered as regular gasoline, not to indiscriminately ban E-15 or even 20 or 25% ethanol.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have no desire to have E-15 in any of my vehicles, a present possibility that already exists but prohibiting anything greater than E-10 will also prohibit E-85. Before we support the ban the wording at the very least needs to be changed to reflect that E-15 cannot be offered as regular gasoline, not to indiscriminately ban E-15 or even 20 or 25% ethanol.
Whaddya suppose will happen when they put it in a pump with regular gas and a single hose? Think your bike might get a good dose, especially if you only throw a gallon or so in like on a Sportster?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
http://environment.about.com/od/ethanolfaq/f/ethanol_problem.htm

Being from Nebraska you will appreciate that article.... The amount of energy used to refine Ethanol is alarming, never mind all the land needed to grow all those grains.
I don't want to see high alcohol used in fuels if it has the potential of ruining operating equipment. If you think raising corn takes energy, just think of the energy it takes to produce a new bike!

But I think the article leaves a few questions unanswered.

A lot of the energy used in the study is to produce the fertilizers and pesticides, but they would be used anyway. And much of the processing is done with natural gas of which we have an abundance, but no means to directly propel our vehicles in the way alcohol already does.

If I can buy 5 gorgeous ears of corn for a buck and a quarter, that tells me that there must be plenty available for eats and farmers probably ain't getting much return on their investments.

One could argue that we could take all the oversupply and ship it to hungry people, but that takes a lot of energy too. And not sure farmers are willing to do all that work for free.

There's always more than meets the eye and such issues. Don't be so quick to latch onto a position just because it fits into some ideological position.

I for one would love the idea of using ethanol to power lawn equipment. I could buy it in mason jars and make martinis with what's left over after mowing the yard.
 

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Yeah Saddlebag I agree with you about latching on to one side of an argument too quickly... We have had quite a few conversations you and I. I consider you to be intelligent, so do some research and then get back to me. You will be shocked when you dig deep and get to the truth about ethanol. I don't want to sound like a wac job... Our governments have led us into a dark place. I don't want to get started on the food we are eating and how terrible it is.


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Dig in your heels all you want SB but E-85 is available in some stations locally and my pickup is designed to burn it. I do not buy it because of 2 factors. It contains much less energy per gallon so the price should be lower than it is and ethanol is hygroscopic and my pickup sits too long to have any hygroscopic fuel in it. Hey, I ride the bike daily and the pickup may sit for months.
The shift from E-10 to E-15 is gaining no ground so why pass a new law to prohibit it? Alcohol costs money to produce and there is no incentive to do so in the present laws, which means nobody will produce it just to lose money. If not for the present incentives, nobody would be producing the E-10 that is out there.
 

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I for one would love the idea of using ethanol to power lawn equipment. I could buy it in mason jars and make martinis with what's left over after mowing the yard.

Sounds like you're from my neighborhood. Here we get our corn from a jar.cheers
 
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