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Discussion Starter #1
Installed the Loydz air filter on my Cross Country last night. Haven't taken it for a spin yet because it's cold and raining. Which brings me to my question... the new filter leaves a 1" gap between the tank and frame exposing the filter. Anybody have problems with rain water getting in there? Anyone come up with a solution to this potential problem?

Thanks.
 

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Rain in Florida, only every day... I do still really enjoy my visits there.

My guess is that the gap is there to draw in more air as it is a filter with a much higher flow rating. I am looking into getting one over the winter, bike gets parked once there is snow/ice covering the road to my place.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, it rains often here and I have to ride through a monsoon on occasion. The last thing I want is for the bike to ingest enough water to cause damage or premature wear/failure. When cleaning the previous filter I noticed a white ring on the frame where the filter sits (as well as whole bugs, leaves, and other various debris stuck in the filter). Looked like water had sneaked past the factory seal and sat there until it evaporated. If that can happen with the seal in place I'm wondering how much water and other stuff is going to get in there without the seal.

I have a Kawasaki as my #2 bike. It has an aftermarket intake installed with a K&N filter that is completely exposed. I park and throw a plastic bag over the intake if it rains hard.

The XC is my long distance bike. Don't want to park if it starts raining hard... put on the rain gear and keep rolling.
 

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I have wondered this also, but I have seen people that have posted about taking the strip out and still running in plenty of rain without issue. I put a lloyds in the other day myself.
 

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I've had one since they were released and I haven't had any problems and I've ridden in some heavy rain.

Cheers Kym
 

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You may get a few drops of water in there but nothing that will hurt it. HD's run the filter right out in the rain with no problems.

I almost bought one of these. Are you guys having good results with them? Is it worth the high price they cost?
 

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I modified my strip to still use it with my Llyodz filter just so I didn't worry about rain or other contaminants. I ran the Vic performance filter without the strip for about 5K miles and it was black a night.

No, it doesn't cause any noticeable drawbacks. My setup is the signature and I have nearly zero popping and no complaints with roll on power.

Ride safe.
 

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Not certain of the cause of your concern. The filters COMPLETELY SEALS off the intake with, well.... the filter itself. If any water DID happen to get "too" the filter, the filter would simply absorb it, right? IMHO you would have to get a LOT of water in there (like a hose pointing into the opening which isn't going to happen under normal riding circumstances unless you were trying to ride through the NYC subways during Sandy)

Someone running the Lloyds on a Cross Roads might have an issue but I would don't that anyone with a Cross Country would have the same issues since the front fairing blocks the majority of the water from having any "direct" access to that opening so there is one more thing to comfort your thoughts.
 

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Not certain of the cause of your concern. The filters COMPLETELY SEALS off the intake with, well.... the filter itself. If any water DID happen to get "too" the filter, the filter would simply absorb it, right?
If it's the oil type, I would imagine the oil would prevent most of the water from entering the filter to begin with. I'd think it would bead up and run off it unless applied at high pressure.
 

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Engines are tolerant of rain. Rain infiltration is an expected design consideration so failure from rainwater is not likely. Water is channeled away, engine heat evaporates water, the filter atomizes it, and under pressure it converts to hydrogen and oxygen. In the right circumstances, it could even increase hp and decrease heat. Not a recommendation, just a hypothetical.
I had an Evo parked in a basement garage at our beach place when floods came. Found the bikes by wading chestdeep through beach balls and floating coolers until we caught the glint off my buddy's streetside mirror on his apehangers about an inch out of the water.
Rolled the bikes up to high ground and pulled the plugs. Toweled off the battery connections as best we could in the pouring rain and hit the button. Spewed a stream of mist for a few revs. Dumped some Marvel down the plug holes and tarped them. Waited for two days until the roads were open to take my bike to the dealer. It was only a month old after all.
Fluid changes, a couple of handlebar switches and I was good to go three days later.
When I picked up the bike the wrench said that it was 99% dry. I pushed the button and it fired right up. I threw a leg over it and when I sat down I found out what the wet 1% was.
Still own that bike 16 years later and have never been in the motor or had electrical problem one (that I didn't bring on myself).
 

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Great info Pop! I didnt realize how high a tolerance bikes had for h2o. Thanks for sharing that!


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