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I want to run either a 20-amp line or a 220v line to my garage for my air compressor. I'm fairly adept mechanically (I did my own cams!) but I know Jack Schitt about doing things on my house. Anyone have an idea what this might cost? Electrical panel is at the opposite end of the house in a finished wall...
 

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I want to run either a 20-amp line or a 220v line to my garage for my air compressor. I'm fairly adept mechanically (I did my own cams!) but I know Jack Schitt about doing things on my house. Anyone have an idea what this might cost? Electrical panel is at the opposite end of the house in a finished wall...
There are a lot of variables here. Now generally a 220v air compressor will need a 30amp breaker with 10 gage solid copper wire. If the distance is 100 ft or less. Can you run the wiring from your existing electrical panel and is rated to handle the additional amperage. Now there are five hp air compressors that will run off of a 20amp, 120v wall plug. I used one for years until the pump went out. It was large enough to use air tools with to rotate automotive tires, and other air tools. I have one half the size now that still does what I need to do, put not as fast as the old compressor. 220 is more energy efficient than 110. I ran a 30amp 220v line in by barn about a 50 ft run a couple of years ago. For a 30amp breaker, 10gage Romex wiring and electrical outlet plug cost maybe 150 dollars. But I had ample space in my electrical panel.
 

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Yeah; probably need to run a new line to a new panel in the garage where you can install the 30 amp breaker and 220. I think most people know that 220 is basically two lines of 110.

I would hire an electrician to at least run a new line and breaker box in the garage. It probably wouldn't cost much more for him to run a 220 line to where you need it. This kind of thing is very basic for electricians. Sometimes you can find one who will do it for cash on his own time. If you belong to a Facebook group for your local area you can post a message to contact you via IM for a qualified electrician (not a handyman) to do this for you on a weekend day or something. Just a thought.

Quick story: I ran a 220 line/outlet to a spot outside my house to power a small motor home I had for a while that someone had turned it into a 220 input and 110 output inside it. He did this to save money on energy costs. I forgot about doing that and kept burning out battery trickle chargers until I realized my mistake. Moral of the story: Probably a good idea to label the 220 outlet clearly.
 

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You Tube is your friemd

I put a 220 plug box into my house along with a switch for generator power. I'm no e-lec-tri-shun either ;-) I got the info form YouTube. Should be easy to find and you'd be surprised how easy it is to do. The key would be to get it inspected by an electrician if you need to get it approved by your city/county. (My former county didn't have inspections!) . LMYR
 

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The verdict is in. I’ll need to contact an electrician...
 

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One thing you could do to save labor costs is to run the wire through your attic or crawl space yourself and leave enough at each end to reach the breaker box and the outlet.

This could save an hour or two of your electricians billing hours.
 

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One thing you could do to save labor costs is to run the wire through your attic or crawl space yourself and leave enough at each end to reach the breaker box and the outlet.

This could save an hour or two of your electricians billing hours.
Would a licensed electrician allow this? There are rules in the governing electrical codes related to how/where such wires are attached to wood studs, where they are run, how big a hole in used in the wood studs that through which the wire passes, where there are metal protective plates required, and more. If you did this work yourself, the electrician would likely at least have to carefully inspect the entire run and might not even take the job if you wanted to do this part yourself. Make sure to clear this alternative with the electrician first before you do this.
 

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I'd also recommend you get a couple of bids on the job. Prices can vary greatly.
Be sure the job is permitted and that an inspector looks it over after it is installed.
That protects you down the road. All electricians are not created equal but the permit inspection process insures that your getting safe workmanship.
 

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I'd also recommend you get a couple of bids on the job. Prices can vary greatly.
Be sure the job is permitted and that an inspector looks it over after it is installed.
That protects you down the road. All electricians are not created equal but the permit inspection process insures that your getting safe workmanship.
As a retired residential building inspector, I would encourage you to have a licensed electrician get a permit for the work.
 

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NAB has the best answer in my opinion. I do all my own electrical work in house ,shop, and barn. Ran 10 Gage wire and have had no problems for the last 20 years I've lived here. I have a 220 volt 60 gallon air compressor But a 110 volt small air compressor would do most small jobs.
 

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As it turns out, I’ve lived in that house for almost 20 years and hadn’t realized I had an additional line in the garage that wasn’t used for anything. It was disconnected from whatever it was powering before I moved in. I simply moved it to my compressor and problem solved.
 

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As it turns out, I’ve lived in that house for almost 20 years and hadn’t realized I had an additional line in the garage that wasn’t used for anything. It was disconnected from whatever it was powering before I moved in. I simply moved it to my compressor and problem solved.
! Perfect !
 

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The verdict is in. I’ll need to contact an electrician...
Good decision. Dud electrical work is a big cause of house fires. '"Think of the money I've saved" doesn't count for much when you are standing outside at 3am watching your house burn down.
 
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