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I didn't really find the direct feedback I was looking for, when searching about this. Maybe my search skills are lack luster...

So, if you installed a PCV, for an average rider (not a drag racer), is the Auto Tuner worth the extra $300? Or would you just have the shop tune it on the dyno?
 

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It depends.

My thoughts are thus:

A dyno tune done by someone who really knows what they are doing will probably net you better performance, but you will want to have it tuned every time you decide you want to change cams, change exhaust, change intake (to a certain degree), up the displacement etc.

Auto Tune will remap for you every time you make a change so you don't need dyno time, but the net gains in performance may not be the same.

As for the exact performance difference, I have no idea.
 

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I've dealt with the Autotuner on a couple of different bikes before and I don't like them, though I've never used them on a Victory. They never have given me the best map possible and the fuel mileage usually gets terrible with the Autotuner. I've seen where you have to ride your bike in a very specific manner while programming the Autotuner otherwise you confuse it and it makes the maps really rich. And they are never as good as a dyno tune. IMHO the only time an autotuner is worthwhile is if you can't get to a dyno tuner easily and you plan on making several incremental improvements. Other than that you just can't beat a dyno tune.
 

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Cost and comfort level play in too.
Pros and Cons:
The auto-tune is about the same cost as having the bike dyno tuned.
Dyno tuning is "set it and forget it" while the auto-tune takes some work on your part to get everything dialed in.
Auto tune will make up for future changes - regular PC's will have to be re-dyno'd
 

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I have an autotune and overall it was the right decision.

What was stated above was true though, in that the autotune will tune your bike specifically under the conditions you are riding at. THat is, if you are chopping the throttle a lot and making a lot of fast changes to the throttle position and/or engine load.

Autotune works best under relatively steady conditions, and then it does have some variation based on environmental conditions. The best way to use it, I've found is to keep iterating by running for a while, then zeroing the map, then lowering the thresholds for correction (I clamp down more on enleanment for safety reasons), and then do it all over again. By now, the variation I get on my map over time is at most +-7%, which is not a lot. This give me confidence that the autotune is consistent enough for my needs.

Another, more tedious but perhaps more effective method would be to use this method I described with a map switch, and switch autotune off on the fly when you feel you've got the right performance during (or after) a ride. I might actually be doing this soon.
 
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