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Discussion Starter #1
Yes, I am guilty of "Battery Abuse".

I have a 2012 XCT (bought in October 2011) and so far have run the battery down to NOTHING 3 times. I mean NO POWER whatsoever and then I would throw the Battery TenderPlus on the thing and restore the power to it.

MY QUESTION is...for a 3-4 year old battery...Am I on "borrowed" time with this battery now since I have zapped it 3 times?

Or is the life of the battery still intact (5+ years)?

Anyone wanna give a BATTERY LESSON to us battery ignorant folks an edumacation. thumb up
 

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Run it down to nothing how? Just by sitting? Then yes- I would say "borrowed time" is a fair characterization. While some people may get 5 yrs out of a battery this certainly doesn't mean they all will go that far.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nope...all 3 times I have RAN IT DOWN by leaving the key on. Never (ever) from not being used...it never sits more than 2 weeks (only then it's because it's winter)...

So this is from leaving the KEY on and running it down.

As of this morning it has taken the charge (or appears to have)...but my concern is that I'll be on a trip (on a cool morning) and the thing won't start then.

So I'm worried I have weakened the battery.
 

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I wouldn't worry till it starts to show signs of weakness. Like slow starts.
 

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Running a lead acid battery down below 50% is a no-no. This comes from experience with RV's which are battery destroyers in the first place. Since I'm new to Victory and don't really know what kind of batteries are even in them, let alone where they are stashed (I assume they're about 3 stories down under the seat) I can't give you a definitive answer but....

I can tell you that the sealed batteries which are commonly used on modern motorcycles are pretty bullet-proof. In the olden days if we got a year out of a battery with a button starter we considered ourselves pretty fortunate. Nowadays five and six years isn't uncommon as long as the bike gets ridden frequently which it sounds like yours does.

On the bright side, sealed batteries don't usually just croak like the old ones. You will usually get some warning signs that it's starting to get tired. Things like labored starting or a re-set on your dashboard because of low voltage etc. I do wish that Victory would have put a headlight interrupt on the starter button, there really isn't any need to drive the starter and the headlight both at the same time.
 

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Put a good over night charge on the battery and then take it to auto store and have them test it.
Then you'll know.
Back in the day you would of burned up the points and it would not start.
 

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When a battery's charge falls below a certain level, sulphate starts to coat the plates and acts as an insulator, preventing the plates from absorbing or giving off a charge. Repeated discharges, like Arkie describes, will have the plates coated with sulphate to the point where the battery ceases to function.
 

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How do you miss all those lights? :D

Over the years- I have developed a habit of killing the engine via the key- not the kill switch. Maybe that would help? I'm not well versed on how killing the battery completely will affect it's overall lifespan, so I'll leave that.
 

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Heat is generally what shortens a batteries life but as said; the build up of sulphate can hasten it as well. Most batteries will give some kind of sign it's getting tired but sometimes they just die all at once. I've done the same thing to my XC battery a couple of times and it always came back but now that it's going on 3 years old I decided to play it safe and replace it. For just $66 shipped it really is cheap insurance. I run these Chrome Batteries in both bikes now. Same battery fits in both.

http://www.chromebattery.com/ytx20hl-bs-high-performance-power-sports-battery.html
 

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Also; keep an eye on your battery charging meter. It will let you know if the battery is needing more juice to be kept charged up.

Lastly, it is a quirk with the late model Victories and somewhat with the earlier models that they can start running strange when the battery is low, so it really does help to keep an eye on the battery's health.
 

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Mine went out over night with no sign of problems - still was the Polaris marked battery. I ran it down to 0% 2X by forgetting to turn off my stereo amp.
Now is a good time buy a new battery if you are getting close - NAPA has an exactly the same battery that came with the bike on sale for $80. right now - normally $130. - I put the new battery in yesterday -
not sure how long the sale goes for.cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK...battery came back fine.

However, I'm gonna get a new battery. Bob...basically the Chrome battery is identical to the Yuasa except for the price...correct?

I can actually buy the Yuasa here in town for $74.00.
 

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...Since I'm new to Victory and don't really know what kind of batteries are even in them, let alone where they are stashed (I assume they're about 3 stories down under the seat) I can't give you a definitive answer but....
Joe: the battery on a Cross bike is tucked away at the bottom of the "chin fairing" (the piece of black plastic directly behind the front fender). That chin fairing comes off by taking four (4mm) button-head Allen bolts out -- two at the front top, and two underneath the bike, as the piece curves back -- and then sliding it a bit to one side (it has lips running down each side). Pretty easy, all in all.

Just a suggestion: I see from your posts that you have an XC, but you might want to include that info in your signature. Makes it easier to respond to some posts.
 

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Speaking of that grille part of the chin fairing, mine was almost impossible to remove and replace without loosening the side panels. After I installed my Clearwater lights, using the side panel bottom bolt holes, I didn't want to have to realign those lights every time I removed the grille. So I filed down some of that lip, or flange, on the sides of the grille--especially where it bound the most--and now it removes and replaces much easier. If your grille removes/replaces with difficulty, just file off some of the flange and viola!
 

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Speaking of that grille part of the chin fairing, mine was almost impossible to remove and replace without loosening the side panels. After I installed my Clearwater lights, using the side panel bottom bolt holes, I didn't want to have to realign those lights every time I removed the grille. So I filed down some of that lip, or flange, on the sides of the grille--especially where it bound the most--and now it removes and replaces much easier. If your grille removes/replaces with difficulty, just file off some of the flange and viola!
I ran into the same issue RICZ when I first checked the battery but after that I learned to remove the bottom screws, the two top screws, and simply let it drop a bit then turn it and continue downward. It comes right out that without having to loosen the side panels. Reverse the process to put it back in.
 

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wspollack said:
the battery on a Cross bike is tucked away at the bottom of the "chin fairing" (the piece of black plastic directly behind the front fender).
Interesting, I just assumed that Victory buried the thing under the seat like most everybody else.
 

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I ran into the same issue RICZ when I first checked the battery but after that I learned to remove the bottom screws, the two top screws, and simply let it drop a bit then turn it and continue downward. It comes right out that without having to loosen the side panels. Reverse the process to put it back in.
Originally, it would not drop out as you stated, until I shaved down those flanges a bit. Now it does.thumb up
 

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Interesting, I just assumed that Victory buried the thing under the seat like most everybody else.
Never assume...especially about the location of components in a machine. :crzy:
 

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I've got to get it into my head that Victory didn't "follow" the other guys when they designed this thing. That should have been evident when I discovered the overhead cams.
 
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