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Discussion Starter #1
When ever I had to do a belt alignment it was always a challenge as I could get it pretty centered while the bike was on the jack but once ridden it would move . It would always take several attempts to get it right. Always have heard about others having a hard time getting the alignment right.
I tried spinning the wheel backwards as I had heard that was the proper way to adjust it, but the belt would drift so rapidly to one side it was never going to work. I just went back to spinning the wheel forward to get my adjustment.
Went on youtube thinking there must be videos there showing a proven method but there was nothing on a Vic, a few on belt tightening, but not alignment. Found one for an Indian set up which is the same as the Vic. The guy adjusted it spinning the wheel backward and called it good to go. I wasn't buying it as he never showed the alignment after riding the bike.
I decided to look threw the shop manual I had downloaded (thanks BBob) only to find the backward spin adjustment is followed by a final forward spin adjustment. Since my belt when cold was making minor noise, I decided to give it a try and do a video to post on youtube using my phone camera. I made a makeshift stand for the phone and got under way. I finish up and start to playback and ....all I got is a grey screen. I set the friggin phone down backwards!
Anyway the belt looked pretty good tracking fine, but all that was in my mind is that once ridden it would change. I went out for a short ride and a good run on the highway. No chirps or any other noise and when I got back home and looked I could see teeth on both sides.:eek I was more than happy. Now if I can just learn how to face the camera the right way! :nerd
 

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Yah, I found the same thing to be true. Spinning the tire forwards AND backwards when adjusting it is the trick. The belt will track to the inside or the outside a bit depending on which way you spin it but if you can spin it both ways and it stays off the sides of the pulley you're good to go. Glad you found a method that works for you.
 

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On my bike, the outside dimension on the rear pulley is the same as the outside dimension of the front pulley... so... I put a string across the belt between 2 teeth and back the bike up until the string is in between the pulley and the belt at about the 5:00 position (face of the pulley is flat there, you don't want to be on the protruding part).

Pull the string tight to the back of the tire and slowly bring it inward... it should touch the front edge and the rear edge of the rear pulley at the same time. If you get the tension right and the alignment right, the belt will USUALLY track center of both pulleys, but some belts just don't track that straight and it will be inside on the front pulley just a little.

You can eyeball across the flanges of the pulley and the down the line where the string would be after this and see that the pulleys are in line with each other, the belt is centered at the bottom of the rear pulley, and riding center of the front pulley too (almost always).

Carpenters will understand.... we use string lines for everything. You pull a string tight, it's STRAIGHT!!!!
 

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I followed manual when I changed rear tire. It's in owners manual and shop manual. Makes sense if you read it a couple times. Belt has never made a sound so I think I did okay so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
On my bike, the outside dimension on the rear pulley is the same as the outside dimension of the front pulley... so... I put a string across the belt between 2 teeth and back the bike up until the string is in between the pulley and the belt at about the 5:00 position (face of the pulley is flat there, you don't want to be on the protruding part).

Pull the string tight to the back of the tire and slowly bring it inward... it should touch the front edge and the rear edge of the rear pulley at the same time. If you get the tension right and the alignment right, the belt will USUALLY track center of both pulleys, but some belts just don't track that straight and it will be inside on the front pulley just a little.

You can eyeball across the flanges of the pulley and the down the line where the string would be after this and see that the pulleys are in line with each other, the belt is centered at the bottom of the rear pulley, and riding center of the front pulley too (almost always).

Carpenters will understand.... we use string lines for everything. You pull a string tight, it's STRAIGHT!!!!
Very interesting, I can follow that. I'm assuming the string is held in place by the belt tension on the front pulley. How did you determine the edges on both pulleys were made to be exactly in line? I'll have to give it a try next time I have to do the belt tension. Maybe I'll give it a try now just to see how close I got it.
 

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On my bike, the outside dimension on the rear pulley is the same as the outside dimension of the front pulley... so... I put a string across the belt between 2 teeth and back the bike up until the string is in between the pulley and the belt at about the 5:00 position (face of the pulley is flat there, you don't want to be on the protruding part).

Pull the string tight to the back of the tire and slowly bring it inward... it should touch the front edge and the rear edge of the rear pulley at the same time. If you get the tension right and the alignment right, the belt will USUALLY track center of both pulleys, but some belts just don't track that straight and it will be inside on the front pulley just a little.

You can eyeball across the flanges of the pulley and the down the line where the string would be after this and see that the pulleys are in line with each other, the belt is centered at the bottom of the rear pulley, and riding center of the front pulley too (almost always).

Carpenters will understand.... we use string lines for everything. You pull a string tight, it's STRAIGHT!!!!
I like this. It makes perfect sense.
You are ensuring the rear pulley is square to the front pulley.
This and rotating the wheel both ways after to check will ensure the proper alignment.

This should probably be put at "Sticky Status"
It's got my vote.
 

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If the belt is wandering from side to side while riding, it's probably a good idea to check both wheel and swing arm bearings. And the axle nut! Mine was doing it, until I replaced the wheel bearings last weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If the belt is wandering from side to side while riding, it's probably a good idea to check both wheel and swing arm bearings. And the axle nut! Mine was doing it, until I replaced the wheel bearings last weekend.
Guess always that would be a good Idea. Yea, if the wheel is wobbling It surely would have an effect on the belt tracking as it doesn't take much.
As far as turning the wheel forward and backward to adjust, the manual has you turn backward and adjust the belt to run just against the outside edge of the pulley. Then turn forward and adjust belt until it just comes back off the pulley NOT CENTERED but just off the edge. I also found that when tightening the wheel the axle has a tendency to move back so I will tap the axle forward to keep the adjuster tight. I'll bet this is where many people go wrong and why the belt moves on them. I did this method and it worked perfectly 1st shot. No more having to go back 2 or 3 times to make adjustments.:wink
 
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