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I've noticed there are lots of very experienced motorcyclists on this forum, and willing to share great advice.

What's the best riding tip that you can share that can help newer bikers stay safe on the road?
For example, if I'm riding in heavy traffic (North America), and there's a car on my right, I avoid being on his back corner, or alongside the car. And if I can't see the driver's face through his door mirror when I'm behind the car, I assume he can't see me. Either stay behind, or pass with safety, but don't hang on the back corner of the car! thumb up
 

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I've noticed there are lots of very experienced motorcyclists on this forum, and willing to share great advice.

What's the best riding tip that you can share that can help newer bikers stay safe on the road?
For example, if I'm riding in heavy traffic (North America), and there's a car on my right, I avoid being on his back corner, or alongside the car. And if I can't see the driver's face through his door mirror when I'm behind the car, I assume he can't see me. Either stay behind, or pass with safety, but don't hang on the back corner of the car! thumb up
Oh boy... this is going to be a long thread! Have you taken a motorcycle safety course?
 

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Having been on the receiving end of several direct attacks from cagers, and also being an MSF Ridercoach for years, I can tell you the safest way to ride is to ride as if you're invisible. Never assume that you're seen, and always play the "What if?" game, e.g., "What if that car makes a left in front of me?" or, "What if that kid runs out in the street?" Always have an exit strategy just in case. And do whatever you can to be seen. More lights, bright reflective clothing, etc. And last but not least, know you and your bikes limitations. Learn from other's mistakes and take as many safety/riding courses as you can. Good luck!
 

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Having been on the receiving end of several direct attacks from cagers, and also being an MSF Ridercoach for years, I can tell you the safest way to ride is to ride as if you're invisible. Never assume that you're seen, and always play the "What if?" game, e.g., "What if that car makes a left in front of me?" or, "What if that kid runs out in the street?" Always have an exit strategy just in case. And do whatever you can to be seen. More lights, bright reflective clothing, etc. And last but not least, know you and your bikes limitations. Learn from other's mistakes and take as many safety/riding courses as you can. Good luck!
:I agree:

also, ride within your limits, keep your ride in tip top condition, meaning engine, brakes, tires, belt or chain , do not drink and ride, give yourself a couple of yrs worth of experience before considering riding with any group of riders, [if that interest you. ]

steve
 

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Yes I agree with keeping the bike in top condition and being visible to other vehicles on the road. That being said I guess you have to know your limits. Ride it like you stole it doesn't always apply! I guess my case in point would be braking in a turn. Don't go into a turn with speed on that you can't control, and expect the brakes or shifting to save ya. It can send you into a skidding that you may or may not recover from. I remember riding my vic the first spring I got it at the speeds around the neighborhood ya know 30 or so and trying to get around a turn and hitting rear brake hard in a turn that caused the bike to fishtail an I ended up standing on the thing riding it out with my heart racing, eyes popping out holy crap moment. And this was at a slower speed relative to riding on the open road . so...... there ya go newbies braking or downshifting in a turn could put a hurting on ya. I know I am learning and getting more experience. every year I ride i thought this might be worth mentioning. Keep the shiny side up and the rubber down . ml
 

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I ride with my high beam on during the day time. I am thinking the brighter the light the more they will see you. Beside at dusk when you get behind some one the lights being so bright they movie over cause it bugs them.
The one thing that gives me more life is I keep two fingers on the front brake lever and three on the grip.
When I have to my finger are all ready pulling on the brake and maybe that gives me a 20 second head start on stopping. Road racers do this cause they have to brake so quick why don't we too.thumb up
 

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I ride with my high beam on during the day time. I am thinking the brighter the light the more they will see you. Beside at dusk when you get behind some one the lights being so bright they movie over cause it bugs them.
Yes, I ride with my high beam on at all times, except at night. But I hardly ever ride at night. So if it's too dark for high beam, it's likely too dark for others to see you. That's how I look at it.

The one thing that gives me more life is I keep two fingers on the front brake lever and three on the grip.
When I have to my finger are all ready pulling on the brake and maybe that gives me a 20 second head start on stopping. Road racers do this cause they have to brake so quick why don't we too.thumb up
I use a different approach. Instead of having my foot/hand over the brakes, ready to squeeze at any moment, I give myself an extra 2 seconds of riding space to the car in front. This gives me more time to react, and I do believe they teach in the MSF course against your approach.

As far as it giving you a 20 second head start on stopping, are you saying it takes you 20 seconds to move four fingers from throttle to hand break? Or was that a typo?
sCo_unsure.gif
 

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What's the best riding tip that you can share that can help newer bikers stay safe on the road?
While I wasn't even born yet when some of our forum members have started riding, and therefore I cannot claim the "very experienced" title, I can still give you my two cents. Granted they're not worth as much as the two cents others will give, but they're my 2 pennies nevertheless.

If you want to be on a motorcycle and be safe at the same time, make sure you don't take it out of your garage. Not highly visible gear, slow speed, caution, good technique, experience or anything else (except God's mercy) will keep you safe. You can ride safer, but you cannot stay safe. There is a risk each time you hop on, and only a fool will tell you that riding is safe.

Keep the rubber side down! ;)
 

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Practice & Reading

I've noticed there are lots of very experienced motorcyclists on this forum, and willing to share great advice.

What's the best riding tip that you can share that can help newer bikers stay safe on the road?
For example, if I'm riding in heavy traffic (North America), and there's a car on my right, I avoid being on his back corner, or alongside the car. And if I can't see the driver's face through his door mirror when I'm behind the car, I assume he can't see me. Either stay behind, or pass with safety, but don't hang on the back corner of the car! thumb up
There are numerous websites that discuss safety and riding techniquies. There are a couple of books by David Hough that are available on Amazon that are also very good sources of information. Just the fact that you are asking is a good thing.

http://www.msf-usa.org/riderperception

http://www.msgroup.org/default.aspx

I don't know what you wear when you ride but do consider going ATGATT (All the gear all the time)

It is better to walk away in disgust that ride away in an ambulance.
 

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The head turn. Look where you want to go and not at the front wheel when making sharp slow turns.
 

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This has been the most beneficial technique I've learned about riding, especially at slower speeds. My instructor kept getting on me about "committing" to the head turn. It works - see the bold line in my sig.
 

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The head turn. Look where you want to go and not at the front wheel when making sharp slow turns.
This has been the most beneficial technique I've learned about riding, especially at slower speeds. My instructor kept getting on me about "committing" to the head turn. It works - see the bold line in my sig.
Absolutely! So make sure you don't get distracted and start staring at other things, or you'll end up running into those distractions! The motorcycles have this high tech feature :)crzy:) that lets you ride as you look. You look down, you will go down. You look ahead, where you want to be, and you get there.
 
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