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My best motorcycles have been Hondas. Now Victory's have been very good for me. But Hondas keep parts available for many years.
 

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My best motorcycles have been Hondas. Now Victory's have been very good for me. But Hondas keep parts available for many years.
Yup you can still buy many parts for 70's Hondas. Not 100% of them though. Got a friend just rebuilt rear master cylinder on 70's wing. They don't sell the housing anymore but they sell rebuild kit for the internals.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yup you can still buy many parts for 70's Hondas. Not 100% of them though. Got a friend just rebuilt rear master cylinder on 70's wing. They don't sell the housing anymore but they sell rebuild kit for the internals.
It's a shame the Victory master cylinders are not designed to be rebuilt. Sign of the times I guess. Replace not fix. I hope someone comes up with an alternative to keep the Vic's on the road.
 

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It's a shame the Victory master cylinders are not designed to be rebuilt. Sign of the times I guess. Replace not fix. I hope someone comes up with an alternative to keep the Vic's on the road.
I'm not worried about that those they can be swapped with generic. ABS box though is a concern if it fails.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I'm not worried about that those they can be swapped with generic. ABS box though is a concern if it fails.
Is there a way to disable the ABS and just run without it? I'm personally not a fan of ABS.
 

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I don't see why you couldn't replace the brake lines and not have ABS.
I think the ABS box is designed to fail in a way that won't interfere with braking so just keep riding with standard brakes and an annoying ABS light on.
 

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I don't see why you couldn't replace the brake lines and not have ABS.
I think the ABS box is designed to fail in a way that won't interfere with braking so just keep riding with standard brakes and an annoying ABS light on.
I’ve been doing that for years! If only someone could fix it, I would gladly ride with working ABS!
 

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ABS is nothing but good.
 

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ABS is nothing but good.
I concur. Testing has clearly shown the superior braking achieved from the ABS rapid on/off braking compared to the abilities of individuals to do this. The number of persons without ABS on various motorcycle websites who say something like, "I had to lay the bike down in an emergency braking situation." is large.
 

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Guess I'll never get to know the benefits of ABS since my 2011 XR doesn't have it and I don't plan on getting rid of it for anything else!
 
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I concur. Testing has clearly shown the superior braking achieved from the ABS rapid on/off braking compared to the abilities of individuals to do this. The number of persons without ABS on various motorcycle websites who say something like, "I had to lay the bike down in an emergency braking situation." is large.
Good reason to change the brake fluid according to the service schedule if it is still working.
 

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What I have never been able to understand is how a dual rotor brake system provides superior braking compared to a single rotor system. With either one you can lock up the wheel and send the tire into a skid. Assuming that the friction between the tire and the ground is the limiting factor in braking, if either single or dual rotor brakes can lock up the tire, why cannot either one get you the same braking ability?

I am most certainly wrong on this as I have read several studies showing the superior braking ability of dual rotor systems but none of these studies explained why. It is probably a flaw in my above assumption.
 

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What I have never been able to understand is how a dual rotor brake system provides superior braking compared to a single rotor system. With either one you can lock up the wheel and send the tire into a skid. Assuming that the friction between the tire and the ground is the limiting factor in braking, if either single or dual rotor brakes can lock up the tire, why cannot either one get you the same braking ability?

I am most certainly wrong on this as I have read several studies showing the superior braking ability of dual rotor systems but none of these studies explained why. It is probably a flaw in my above assumption.
Hi I posted this a few times in the last few years, interesting topic

Victory Vegas Jackpot 129 ft, is a single disk, same stopping distance as dual sports bikes etc

The way I see it, dual disks produce less heat, so if you would top speed to zero 3x then the single disk would take longer to stop then dual disks, that's all it is, so we will never have to worry about that, i went from single to dual on my Jackpot, just install Llyndals brake pads and smile with 30% better stopping power then stock, EBC & Llyndals have the same stopping power but Llyndals last 3x longer then EBC

Anyway that's enough rambling, and this is just my personal opinion

https://www.reddit.com/r/motorcycles/comments/33sun7
Superbikes:

2011 BMW S1000RR: 129 ft
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2011 Yamaha R1: 137 ft

Supersports:

2011 Yamaha R6: 124 ft
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2010 Star Raider S: 124 ft
2010 Harley Softail Rocker C: 125 ft
2010 Victory Vegas Jackpot: 129 ft
 

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So the limiting factor is not the tire locking up, but repeated stops making the brake pads and rotors hot over and over doing heavy braking over again, like on a track ... So it will not even matter on a mountain road twisties coz if you accelerate to the next bend then the pads and rotors can cool off enough .. except guys who keep there foot on the rear brake, you see the blue colour disk on the rear , but that's a different story
 

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I fully agree that on repeated brakings in a short period of time, spreading the heat generation across two rotors/pads/calipers is a good thing and could prevent boiling of brake fluid. However, the tests of braking distance you list are most likely a single braking event not the third of three or some sequential braking.

In a single braking event with cool brakes, why do dual rotor systems stop a bike faster than a single rotor system? I know they do so but want to know "WHY". Just my peculiar nature. I am never happy being given a fish. I want to be taught to fish :)
 

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I have always used the transmission for braking on motorcycles and cars. Even with automatic transmissions. I taught a cousin how to use the transmission to slow down her Mustang going into curves coming down Sandia Peak in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in the early 70's.
 
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