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I noticed that when I take my hands off the grips, my Judge tends to lean to the right. I was thinking maybe because both the belt and exhaust are on the right side. Does anybody else have this problem?
 

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I've seen others post about the same problem on different bikes. Pretty much every time it was because there is more weight on the side it leans towards or a slightly misaligned rear wheel.

The same advice is also given every time as well... Don't take your hands off the bars thumb up
 

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Might I suggest, if you can, get the front wheel off the ground. Move the bars lock to lock and return it to center. If it moves, make sure nothing is binding and pulling the wheel.(cables, wiring, hoses) Check at a 45 degree left and right also, it doesn't take much to bind up.
This is the easiest place to start. From there, a whole host of things could be going on. Fork fluid difference, swing arms, tires, weight, etc.

Best wishes
 

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The bike has less than 1400 miles on it and was doing it basically from the beginning. Is it common on the Vics in general?

Thanks for the advice LostinTexas
 

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Mine will track straight down the road until my wife slaps me on the helmet, unless there is excessive road crown. Plenty of that on surface highways in ID.
 

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The bike has less than 1400 miles on it and was doing it basically from the beginning. Is it common on the Vics in general?

Thanks for the advice LostinTexas
Not common to Vics but apparently may be an issue with the Kingpin subset so you may want to search that forum for pointers on how to get it corrected.
 

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I noticed this also on a brand spanking new high-ball. I'll check for cable binding. The stock exhaust I'm told is quite heavy though. Wouldn't surprise me if an exhaust swap fixes it.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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You bike is a Conservative. :)
 

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I don't know about the Kingpin, but have never been on a machine that the make up made it drift.
Most of the modern bikes, BTW I am probably Vics biggest critic on how "modern" they are, are set up well. Folks blame this that or the other without much merit. If 10 pounds makes a difference you can feel in a bag, I would say something else is wrong.
Listen to the folks that have dealt with it. I keep forgetting about the belt drive and how critical it is to get that "modern" 1980 technology lined properly. The ABS is a 1980 flashback too. LOL
I can let go of the bars when alone and go longer than I would like. I don't try this 2 up for reasons already explained above. LOL

cheers
 

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I've seen others post about the same problem on different bikes. Pretty much every time it was because there is more weight on the side it leans towards or a slightly misaligned rear wheel.

The same advice is also given every time as well... Don't take your hands off the bars thumb up
Both of these are correct. The stock exhaust is VERY heavy. After market systems will reduce the effect. Also, for whatever reason, it seems that wheel alignment from the factor is always skewed. I would definitely follow the recommended procedure for wheel alignment. It's easy enough to do as long as you have a lift to get the rear wheel off the ground.
 

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I half to ask are you saying leaning like tipping over or are you saying when hands are not on bars the bike stears to the right.
 

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I noticed, the bike actually leans to the right, not the bars, and the bike actually turns right.. This indicates to me (I'm truly no expert), if there's any handlebar binding it'd pulling bars to the left counter-steering in order to drop the bike into a right-side lean, I guess.

It "feels" as though the bike is indeed "heavier" on the right side. As I'm planning on exhaust after break-in, it'll be a good experiement to see.

I do plan on a visit to dealer on first service for that first oil change, just because, so I'll have them check alignment and ask them about it. Wish I had that service manual, I'd just check myself.

No adverse turning issues noticed.. The bike feels solid in either direction.
 

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I would still check the rear wheel alignment. Also do you feel a catch when moving the bars from left to right. One of my earlier bikes actually had a bad bearing and it hung up after turning a bit.
 

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Don't carry anything in your right pockets or lean a little to the left to compensate.

Seriously now it could be that the roads you're riding on are crowned and the bike is trying to follow them. Get on a highway and see if it does the same thing in the left or center lane as it does in the right lane. Also make sure your arse is centered on the seat.
 

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Don't carry anything in your right pockets or lean a little to the left to compensate.

Seriously now it could be that the roads you're riding on are crowned and the bike is trying to follow them. Get on a highway and see if it does the same thing in the left or center lane as it does in the right lane. Also make sure your arse is centered on the seat.
Excellent idea, and the crowning is one reason I haven't gone full ballistic paranoid about it at this point. Here in Asheville, it's dang difficult to find a flat road though. hehe
 

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I agree that it is more than likely the crown of the road, it's the same reason what causes left side tire wear. I read an article a while back and it was saying that the left side of a motorcycle tire travels almost twice as far as the right in its lifespan...

2012 Hammer 8 ball
 

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I noticed, the bike actually leans to the right, not the bars, and the bike actually turns right.. This indicates to me (I'm truly no expert), if there's any handlebar binding it'd pulling bars to the left counter-steering in order to drop the bike into a right-side lean, I guess.

It "feels" as though the bike is indeed "heavier" on the right side. As I'm planning on exhaust after break-in, it'll be a good experiement to see.

I do plan on a visit to dealer on first service for that first oil change, just because, so I'll have them check alignment and ask them about it. Wish I had that service manual, I'd just check myself.

No adverse turning issues noticed.. The bike feels solid in either direction.
Alignment procedures have been posted in these forums at least a couple different times, you might try doing a search. It's really not difficult, just takes about 20-30 minutes of your time.

I think you will find that alignment has more impact on how the bike tracks and leans than the imbalanced weight. To prove this, once you get the bike going, see how much body movement it takes to impact the track of the bike without touching the handlebars. It takes considerable body shift. Whereas rear wheel alignment will have the same impact as gentle counter steering input on the front wheel.... a little goes a long way with that.
 
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