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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious to know what the main differences are between both these bikes. It is often suggested that the Boardwalk replaced the Kingpin, that they have similarities, yet many people say the Boardwalk has nothing on the Kingpin. Not having seen a Kingpin I am about to purchase a Boardwalk which I have seen and love. Interested to hear any views.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Much obliged, answered a lot of questions.
 

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Basically it's the front suspension, and spoke wheels. You can throw the handle bars in there too, but that's really something minor and I think there is also a shorter shock, and equals less suspension travel. The only thing that would keep me from buying one is the spoke wheels..... Too much maintenance, and I don't mean cleaning them.


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Discussion Starter #5
Basically it's the front suspension, and spoke wheels. You can throw the handle bars in there too, but that's really something minor and I think there is also a shorter shock, and equals less suspension travel. The only thing that would keep me from buying one is the spoke wheels..... Too much maintenance, and I don't mean cleaning them.


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Would the average rider notice a major difference between the two different types of forks? Other than cleaning, what other sort of maintenance is associated with spoked wheels?

I guess it's horses for courses and perhaps it would not be suitable as a daily ride. I am just a fine weather Sunday rider and would be lucky to do 3K Klms a year. The rest of the time I expect I would get much enjoyment cleaning, polishing, caressing all those lovely curves.

But thank you for being so concise with those differences and I think that that is about all there is to it, certainly not enough to put me off.

Appreciate your comments, cheers.
 

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Would the average rider notice a major difference between the two different types of forks?
I notice a considerable difference in the quality of the ride between the KP and all the newer cruiser models with lesser suspension components. The KP does a much better job of gobbling up road irregularities.

But is riding the newer cruisers the end of the world, no.

If you like how it looks and you're not a distance or sporty rider, it's surely an adequate machine. And the best part is that if its ride bothers you too much, you can always go buy better suspension bits for it.

Vic is doing the same thing Harley is now. Putting low end components on their cruisers and top end stuff on their tourers.

I was looking at Progressive Suspension the other day to see what it would cost to upgrade the suspension on a Softail Deluxe to something decent. It was only about a grand if you do it yourself. Considering that one could blow thru that kind of money on decorative Victory doodads in the click of a mouse, a grand don't seem so bad...
 

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Spokes are a little more to maintain in that most shops will have you replace the wheel strips and tubes every time you replace tires. And also if you would be in an unfortunate situation that you get a flat tire, on the road, there's no fixing it with a plug and CO2 kit . But with all the more riding you're planning, these issues won't be a big deal.
 

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I notice a considerable difference in the quality of the ride between the KP and all the newer cruiser models with lesser suspension components. The KP does a much better job of gobbling up road irregularities.
Recent aggressive rides over roads that were in poor condition cemented my love for the Kingpin. Last weekend I had peg feelers rubbing while the road under the bike looked like a washboard... no reaction from the chassis at all... solid and stable with the tires in constant contact with the pavement. I hardly felt any of it, a true testament to the competence of this chassis and suspension.

In fairness I should mention that the bike wears sticky radials which are substantially lighter than the OEM bias ply tires, and the bike also wears Pro-Lite rotors which weigh next to nothing... so unsprung weight has been reduced on this bike which probably helps.

The Boardwalk would be giving up the good forks in addition to the added unsprung weight of 16", tall-sidewall, bias ply tires with innertubes in them. Not sure how spoke wheels compare in weight to the cast aluminum wheels, but I assume the hub, spokes, and rim are steel and would weigh more.
 

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Spokes are a little more to maintain in that most shops will have you replace the wheel strips and tubes every time you replace tires. And also if you would be in an unfortunate situation that you get a flat tire, on the road, there's no fixing it with a plug and CO2 kit . But with all the more riding you're planning, these issues won't be a big deal.
Don't spoke wheels need the spokes torqued and the wheels trued from time to time?
 

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Don't spoke wheels need the spokes torqued and the wheels trued from time to time?
In my experience, I haven't had to have it done on any of my prior bikes. But that isn't to say that is always the case....
 

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Would the average rider notice a major difference between the two different types of forks?
Average rider..... Probably not. I ride very aggressively, and I can say with certainty there is a difference between the inverted front end, and the conventional forks. But again, 3k kl a year, it wont matter at all.
 

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Were it me.. If I didn't want/need bags, I'd favor the boardwalk. I've been thrilled by those same forks on my high-ball, and the bw is simply gorgeous.

If I knew I'd want bags, I'd rule them both out and go to a cross bike in the tour line and be done with it. But I'm one who is second guessing going High-Ball as I wish I had considered the hard-ball from their touring line up. The aluminum frame tour bikes are where Victory has really come alive for big miles. If a Hard-Ball can be made to sit close to the high-ball in seat height and position, I'll have one eventually.

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For street riding conventional forks and USD forks are really no different. People are going to argue this because A person said so and B person agreed. Whatever, fact remains while there is a minor unsprung weight advantage in normal street suspension, UDS forks cost more to maintain, require more maintenance, and are heavier overall versus conventional forks. When you get into Ohlins and super bike spec front ends it makes a difference. For the record USD forks also have more stiction which means they don't move as easily or smoothly. Conventional forks give a smoother plusher ride and with a fork brace are as rigid if not more rigid than USD forks. Do some googling and see what MX guys have to say about the differences. For super bike riding the fork stiffness is very important for a cruiser, flex and suspension operation are more important.
 

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For street riding conventional forks and USD forks are really no different. Whatever, fact remains while there is a minor unsprung weight advantage in normal street suspension, UDS forks cost more to maintain, require more maintenance, and are heavier overall versus conventional forks.
Were the forks the same except for the inverted design, I'd agree that the savings in unsprung weight would probably not have that much of an effect. The inverted forks on the KP are cartridge forks however.

Here's what MCN says about Judge forks:

"It offers good sensitivity to small road ripples, but is less compliant over larger jolts despite its cartridge internals (which they don't have -SB). We felt its overall performance would be better with slightly less compression damping (which can't be changed on a damping rod fork without drilling holes -SB) to lessen its resistance to bigger bumps.

Here's what MC Cruiser had to say about the KP:

"I was also impressed by the suspension, which is soft enough for comfort on the vast majority of pavement hiccups but controlled enough for confident handling. The latest round of suspension refinement puts this Victory on a par with or ahead of other big twins in terms of suspension quality."
 

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Two different bikes. The KP is heavier, longer, and has more rake and less trail. It's 7 inches longer than a Judge so yep I agree would feel different. Unless you are chasing tenths on a road course you will not have an issue with conventional forks.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Wow, so much informed comment I feel suitably educated, thank you people. For months I had my heart set on the HighBall I just thought it was so individual, a personal/individual ride so to speak, then I started favouring the HardBall thinking I was a bad ass, a brain-fart moment. Then I started paying more attention to the BW, it had more classic lines and style befitting my age. Perhaps but it also gives me that soloness, that "it's all mine" feeling that the HighBall gives. But after all the helpful comments I feel happier in my final choice.
 

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Two different bikes. The KP is heavier, longer, and has more rake and less trail. It's 7 inches longer than a Judge so yep I agree would feel different. Unless you are chasing tenths on a road course you will not have an issue with conventional forks.
Here's a goodie bag that may change your mind:

http://www.racetech.com/ProductSearch/2/Victory/VEGAS/2007

Specifically:

Fork Gold Valve Cartridge Emulators
Damping rod forks are notorious for being both too harsh yet too easy to bottom. This is the nature of damping rod fixed orifice forks. In the past all that could be done to improve these forks was change spring rate, oil viscosity or damping hole size, until now.
Cartridge Emulators make damping rod style forks perform like well-tuned cartridge forks. These tunable valves sit on top of the damping rods and are held in place by the main springs. This makes them both simple to install and completely tunable for all conditions and rider preferences.
Track tests have consistently produce lap times that are 1 or more seconds a lap faster while Cruisers and Gold Wing owners rave at the increased control and ride quality.
 

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It's 7 inches longer than a Judge so yep I agree would feel different. Unless you are chasing tenths on a road course you will not have an issue with conventional forks.
The sheetmetal is 7" longer... the wheelbase is not. A long rear fender really doesn't change the handling.

Vegas, Vegas 8-Ball, Judge, Boardwalk, HighBall, Kingpin.... ALL THE SAME CHASSIS. Different suspension pieces, sheetmetal, wheels/tires, and ergos. You could convert any of those to any of the others... all the parts will basically interchange between them.


Unless you are chasing tenths on a road course you will not have an issue with conventional forks.
No one claims there will be any issues with the conventional forks, and I agree that the average cruiser rider will never know the difference. The question was "what are the differences?".

The Kingpin is the handler of the line-up... The styling allows it to look good as a 2-up bagger, a stripped solo bike, or anything in between... The 18" wheels (and 180mm rear tire size) give the owner good choices in sticky low-profile (tubeless) tires, bias and radial alike... The Vegas foot controls bolt right up if you (like me) are not a floorboard type. These are the reasons I bought mine.

My friends who ride sport-tourers have been telling me for years that a cruiser is the wrong tool for the job when it comes to straightening out those twisty mountain roads... Let's just say they have a whole new respect for cruisers now, thanks to a certain yellow Kingpin.
 

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The 7 inches are in the fenders but that is weight and length that you take into consideration when doing maneuvers. The wheelbase is about .8 of an inch longer than the Judge. I always liked the KP. We really should ride together sometime.
 

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The 7 inches are in the fenders but that is weight and length that you take into consideration when doing maneuvers.
Disagree. Judge is 691 wet, mine is 720 wet (29 lbs difference). This weight is bags, fenders... That fender out back weighs what, a couple of pounds?


The wheelbase is about .8 of an inch longer than the Judge.
With my gearing and short belt the rear axle is pretty far forward. I would say our wheelbases closer to equal now.


We really should ride together sometime.
Have been riding with guys form this forum quite a bit lately, feel free to join in.
 
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