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Discussion Starter #1
2011 Kingpin. Replaced pads recently. Front good. Rear functions fine, but question:

The outboard side of the calipers pistons are extended fairly far out. The inboard ones are not. It appears that the caliper is in a fixed position where it is bolted to the bracket. Is what I'm seeing normal or does the caliper float and I need to get it "unstuck" and pushed inward so the pistons are extended the same on each side?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Anybody ???
 

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are you questioning the front or the rear caliper?
Rear is floating and only has pistons on one side.
Front is fixed with two pistons either side.
 

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are you questioning the front or the rear caliper?
Rear is floating and only has pistons on one side.
Front is fixed with two pistons either side.
Rear. When looking at rotor, the pistons are extended out on the outside pad. The inside pad doesn't appear to be pushed inward, away from the caliper towards the rotor. if the rear caliper floats, shouldn't the pads be about the same distance from the inside of the rotor?
 

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Rear. When looking at rotor, the pistons are extended out on the outside pad. The inside pad doesn't appear to be pushed inward, away from the caliper towards the rotor. if the rear caliper floats, shouldn't the pads be about the same distance from the inside of the rotor?
There are no pistons on the inboard side because it's a floating caliper. When the pistons on the outboard side extend, the pad on that side contacts the disk, this happens very quickly and does not yet slow the bike. Continuing to press the brake lever will extend the pistons further which will pull the caliper body towards the outboard side until the inboard pad contacts the disk. At this point both pads are in contact and will squeeze the disk to slow the bike. Release the lever and the caliper slides back inboard and the pistons retract a bit so both pads are off the disk. At no point does the inboard pad extend away from the caliper, it will always be in direct contact with the caliper body because there are no pistons on that side.

Check out this page for an interactive animation showing how sliding calipers work: http://auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-parts/brakes/brake-types/disc-brake2.htm
 

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There are no pistons on the inboard side because it's a floating caliper. When the pistons on the outboard side extend, the pad on that side contacts the disk, this happens very quickly and does not yet slow the bike. Continuing to press the brake lever will extend the pistons further which will pull the caliper body towards the outboard side until the inboard pad contacts the disk. At this point both pads are in contact and will squeeze the disk to slow the bike. Release the lever and the caliper slides back inboard and the pistons retract a bit so both pads are off the disk. At no point does the inboard pad extend away from the caliper, it will always be in direct contact with the caliper body because there are no pistons on that side.

Check out this page for an interactive animation showing how sliding calipers work: http://auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-parts/brakes/brake-types/disc-brake2.htm
Thanks Soofle...You've explained it a lot better than I could've:)
Yep!...exactly what he said
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks !!! Great explanation....
 

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There are no pistons on the inboard side because it's a floating caliper. When the pistons on the outboard side extend, the pad on that side contacts the disk, this happens very quickly and does not yet slow the bike. Continuing to press the brake lever will extend the pistons further which will pull the caliper body towards the outboard side until the inboard pad contacts the disk. At this point both pads are in contact and will squeeze the disk to slow the bike. Release the lever and the caliper slides back inboard and the pistons retract a bit so both pads are off the disk. At no point does the inboard pad extend away from the caliper, it will always be in direct contact with the caliper body because there are no pistons on that side.

Check out this page for an interactive animation showing how sliding calipers work: http://auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-parts/brakes/brake-types/disc-brake2.htm
Exactly. You should only be concerned if your pads are not wearing evenly on both sides; this means your caliper cannot slide freely.
 
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