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Discussion Starter #1
SO I was using this in my Jackpot and it was great oil (Castrol Actevo 20w-40 semi-synthetic) and much better priced than Vic brand. I was going to stock up on some for when my new XC started needing oil changes but was unable to find it anywhere, even online. I emailed Castrol finally yesterday and got this response:

Thank you for contacting Castrol North America.



Castrol Act-evo X-TRA 4T 20W-40 has been discontinued.



We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.


Castrol Consumer Relations
They have not given any further info on why they discontinued it. May have to try the Shell Rotella T now if I can find it at my Walmart now as I am not a fan of 60 dollar oil kits. This is being posted as an FYI to my fellow forum members, not to start a oil thread war.
 

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They still make 10w-40. It will be a little thinner on start up which is not a bad thing. It will get into the engine a little quicker this way and have better protection on start up.
 

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Understood, but why would they run the 20 weight stock then? There must be a reason for it.
 

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Amazon might have it.
 

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Amazon might have it.
I checked amazon for the Castrol and they no longer have any remaining stock. As for the Rotella I have seen it there. I've followed your posts on Rotella for a while now Vindex and I feel confident enough in it not blowing my motor to give it a shot.
 

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Please don't do anything on my account do your own research. I only know what works for me.
 

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In my book, research = doing + observing. I shall research for my next oil change :)
 

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Understood, but why would they run the 20 weight stock then? There must be a reason for it.
A lot of manufactures recommend this weight. I think they carried it to get some of the business from people who are strictly by the book. But there just must not have been enough business for this weight. I have always felt that manufactures recommend this weight to get people to use their brand oil. There just is not many companies that sell it so if you want to go by the book, now you must get oil from the motorcycle manufacture. If you know about oil, you know that using an oil with a lower front number is perfectly safe in a motorcycle.
 

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Understood, but why would they run the 20 weight stock then? There must be a reason for it.
The higher the viscosity of the base oil, the less viscosity modifier material needs to be added to get the oil to perform like 40wt when it's warm.

This has been covered before but for anyone that may not have seen it, 10W-40 does NOT mean 40 weight oil that acts like 10 weight in the "winter". What it means is that a 10 weight base oil has viscosity modifiers in it that allow it to maintain viscosity when hot equivalent to a 40 weight base oil.

Viscosity modifiers are long chain polymers that bunch up when cold and stretch out when hot. The problem is that those long chains are subject to shearing and breaking as they flow around various engine components. In the 90% of motorcycle models on the road that have integrated transmissions and engines, the oil also lubricates the gears which is where a lot of the shearing takes place. As the viscosity modifiers break up over time, the base oil viscosity remains the same but the hot viscosity drops closer and closer to that of the base oil. So over time what you end up with is oil that starts out thin (good for starting a cold engine) but ends up REALLY thin when up to temp (bad for a hot engine).

By using a thicker base oil, less modifier material is needed to get that 40 weight hot performance. That means there's fewer chains to break up and the oil will stay thicker over time.

With frequent changes this is a non-issue. Also, synthetic oils by nature are more viscosity stable and require less viscosity modifier material to be added so again, they will maintain viscosity better over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The higher the viscosity of the base oil, the less viscosity modifier material needs to be added to get the oil to perform like 40wt when it's warm. <snipped>
Seriously thanks man. That was an execellent explanation of it. It makes perfect sense.
 

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I use to be the "Only the best oil for my baby" type.

A few expensive oil changes later, I got over it, and now I run rotella 15-40 conventional. Change it every 2500 miles for $12 per change and guess what? Never a problem, ever, with anything.

Best part is: I use the stuff in everything, other than my car.

Pressure washer
Lawn mower
Victory Hammer
Suzuki Vstrom

No 30 different half emty oil bottles to deal with. One jug covers everything. Love it!
 

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I use to be the "Only the best oil for my baby" type.

A few expensive oil changes later, I got over it, and now I run rotella 15-40 conventional. Change it every 2500 miles for $12 per change and guess what? Never a problem, ever, with anything.

Best part is: I use the stuff in everything, other than my car.

Pressure washer
Lawn mower
Victory Hammer
Suzuki Vstrom

No 30 different half emty oil bottles to deal with. One jug covers everything. Love it!
I laugh every time I see someone post "it's life blood" crap to justify the cost. You want $$$ oil then get $$$ oil who cares.
 

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When I needed a bit of extra oil for an oil change I ended up adding a bit of 15W40 Rotella to my 4 quarts of 20W40 Vic oil. So far the engine and tranny are working just fine. The Rotella-T has the JASO rating so I was happy to use it in a minor role. I have no idea how I would feel about a total oil change using it but it is fine as a supplement. I am hesitant to ignore the advice of any vehicle maker when it comes to lubricants. They know a lot more about it than I ever will.
Note: I also don't ignore my doctor's recommendations about medicines I should take. I figure that is why I pay him those big bucks.
 

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It all comes down to what gives you peace of mind, to me that's priceless.
 

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I used 5w40 rotella t6 in my 01 Vic. It didn't miss a beat. I have only done 1 change but I got the kit for 45.00 at the dealer.
 

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The higher the viscosity of the base oil, the less viscosity modifier material needs to be added to get the oil to perform like 40wt when it's warm.

This has been covered before but for anyone that may not have seen it, 10W-40 does NOT mean 40 weight oil that acts like 10 weight in the "winter". What it means is that a 10 weight base oil has viscosity modifiers in it that allow it to maintain viscosity when hot equivalent to a 40 weight base oil.

Viscosity modifiers are long chain polymers that bunch up when cold and stretch out when hot. The problem is that those long chains are subject to shearing and breaking as they flow around various engine components. In the 90% of motorcycle models on the road that have integrated transmissions and engines, the oil also lubricates the gears which is where a lot of the shearing takes place. As the viscosity modifiers break up over time, the base oil viscosity remains the same but the hot viscosity drops closer and closer to that of the base oil. So over time what you end up with is oil that starts out thin (good for starting a cold engine) but ends up REALLY thin when up to temp (bad for a hot engine).

By using a thicker base oil, less modifier material is needed to get that 40 weight hot performance. That means there's fewer chains to break up and the oil will stay thicker over time.

With frequent changes this is a non-issue. Also, synthetic oils by nature are more viscosity stable and require less viscosity modifier material to be added so again, they will maintain viscosity better over time.
Good post! thumb up
 

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soofle hit the nail on the head but this mainly pertains to dino oils + group III fake synthetics included legally synthetic in the USA. thats why a group IV + V man made synthetics are soooo superior. a 30 wt PAO synthetic acts like a 10-30 without ANY VII added. in colder weather a 10-xx is smart, real synthetic is smarter yet!!! if you go cheap so be it, but Amsoil is about the same price as Vic oil from our sponsor delivered to your door + a very superior product, Redline is another yet but more costly.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Personally I've never been a fan on Amsoil and am not in the mood to try Redline. I've had good luck with the Castrol and it is reasonably priced. Since they discontinued to 20w-40 I'm going to try the 20w-50 and see how it goes.
 

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The higher the viscosity of the base oil, the less viscosity modifier material needs to be added to get the oil to perform like 40wt when it's warm.

This has been covered before but for anyone that may not have seen it, 10W-40 does NOT mean 40 weight oil that acts like 10 weight in the "winter". What it means is that a 10 weight base oil has viscosity modifiers in it that allow it to maintain viscosity when hot equivalent to a 40 weight base oil.

Viscosity modifiers are long chain polymers that bunch up when cold and stretch out when hot. The problem is that those long chains are subject to shearing and breaking as they flow around various engine components. In the 90% of motorcycle models on the road that have integrated transmissions and engines, the oil also lubricates the gears which is where a lot of the shearing takes place. As the viscosity modifiers break up over time, the base oil viscosity remains the same but the hot viscosity drops closer and closer to that of the base oil. So over time what you end up with is oil that starts out thin (good for starting a cold engine) but ends up REALLY thin when up to temp (bad for a hot engine).

By using a thicker base oil, less modifier material is needed to get that 40 weight hot performance. That means there's fewer chains to break up and the oil will stay thicker over time.

With frequent changes this is a non-issue. Also, synthetic oils by nature are more viscosity stable and require less viscosity modifier material to be added so again, they will maintain viscosity better over time.
You are both correct and wrong... the "W" does not stand for weight... it is not 10 weight 40... it is 10 winter 40. When you see a W on a viscosity rating it means that this oil viscosity has been tested at a Colder temperature. The numbers without the W are all tested at 210° F or 100° C which is considered an approximation of engine operating temperature. In other words, a SAE 30 motor oil is the same viscosity as a 10w-30 or 5W-30 at 210° (100° C). The difference is when the viscosity is tested at a much colder temperature. For example, a 5W-30 motor oil performs like a SAE 5 motor oil would perform at the cold temperature specified, but still has the SAE 30 viscosity at 210° F (100° C) which is engine operating temperature. This allows the engine to get quick oil flow when it is started cold verses dry running until lubricant either warms up sufficiently or is finally forced through the engine oil system. The advantages of a low W viscosity number is obvious. The quicker the oil flows cold, the less dry running. Less dry running means much less engine wear.

Now on to answer the OP's question... there's rumor that Polaris has an agreement with Castrol that since Castrol supplies the branded Victory and Indian oils, that Castrol will not offer those specific oils in competition... stranger things have happened.
 
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