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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, to all those who have owned either or both a Cross Country Tour and/or a Honda Goldwing, I am currently trying to choose between the two. My debate is between a 2013 CCT and a 2015 Goldwing. I understand some may be bias, being that you are on this forum (lol), but if I could get your honest opinions on both, it will help in my decision.
My one reservation with the CCT is the fact that parts will be ceased in about nine more years and I tend to keep my bikes for a long period of time. I am a bit concerned about riding position on the Goldwing, with the lack of ability to stretch my legs. I'm also trying to determine which would be more "element" friendly, as I would like to use it as a(n)(at least) 10 month commuter.
Thanks, in advance, for any information that you can help me with. I will be taking everything into consideration, as this is a long term investment.
 

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I have a 13 CCT . I love it and have ridden it extensively and a Gold Wing. Because Polaris screwed us I'd give the nod to the GW. Great bike. Good protection. Fantastic reliability.
 

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I have a Cross Roads and can be objective here because I have owned neither a CC or a GW, but I am intimate with the workings of both. Cutting to the chase, the Victory is a simpler bike, hence cheaper and easier to maintain/repair. Have you seen a GW1800 with the Tupperware removed? What a nightmare of electronics under there! In contrast, Vic Cross bikes are simplicity personified. I have been riding since I was 16 in 1952 and have had many bikes and did my own work. I have never had a bike so user friendly. In the 8 years I've had it, it has never been back to the shop. I never had a bike that one does not have to remove exhaust pipe(s) to remove the rear wheel, but you can with a Cross bike. Its like Polaris told the designers, make it like you are going to have to ride it and work on it.
As to riding; The Vic is not only infinitely more comfortable, it handles far better than a GW1800 - that I can attest to. For one thing, the front of the GW, as it comes, is crap and needs modding if you are going to ride twisties. The XCT has gobs more case capacity, the most in the industry.
Re parts; Many parts are also available from the aftermarket, but chances are excellent you won't need them - I never have.
One last thing; GWs are belly button bikes, everyone has one. I don't know about you, but I like being the only Vic rider in a sea of brand Xs. Nuff sed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks RICZ for your response. I must agree with you about the utter mess of wires you have when taking the skin off of a GW. I felt a bit intimidated just watching a video on how to change the air filter on it!!! I am looking to do my own maintenance and I, admittedly, would be nervous about doing it. So, you have a very valid point. My point about parts stems from the fact that I plan to put an extensive amount of mileage on the bike, so, I'm sure, eventually, the need for parts will arise and I don't want to be left with a bike that I am unable to fix. Thank you for your input. You definitely made me think in a more in-depth manner. Not just the ride, but maintenance too.
 

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Thanks RICZ for your response. I must agree with you about the utter mess of wires you have when taking the skin off of a GW. I felt a bit intimidated just watching a video on how to change the air filter on it!!! I am looking to do my own maintenance and I, admittedly, would be nervous about doing it. So, you have a very valid point. My point about parts stems from the fact that I plan to put an extensive amount of mileage on the bike, so, I'm sure, eventually, the need for parts will arise and I don't want to be left with a bike that I am unable to fix. Thank you for your input. You definitely made me think in a more in-depth manner. Not just the ride, but maintenance too.
From what I've gathered, fuel filters are the most difficult oem parts to get, but there are aftermarket companies that make them, or are at least starting to. At the same time, there are a couple of fellows on here that have 100,000 plus miles on their bikes and still have the original fuel filter.
Anyone on here reading this, correct me if I am wrong, but there aren't any companies making Vic drive belts, correct? I imagine in the coming years, someone will though...

In short, I wouldn't worry about parts for Victory bikes. They're bullet proof if you treat them halfway decent and they're built to effing last!
 

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I can’t compare because I don’t have experience with a GoldWing. I can tell you that the XCT is a capable tourer. My experience includes multi-hour rides going back to 1978 (started riding in 1977). My 2012 XCT has taken me from South Carolina to Indianapolis to Victorville, California and back, plus other shorter multi-hour rides. It is very good to be able to change foot positions. On the California trip, I rode four twelve-hour days going there and the same coming back, still comfortable at the end of each day, and that was two years after surgery for a broken vertebra in my lower back.

As an earlier poster said, the XCT has the most storage space in the industry. That is good not only for long touring, but also for commuting.

XCT comes with heated grips and heated seat, as well as a lot of upper and lower wind shielding. I own a heated jacket liner and heated gloves, so I added a jack to plug those in. I commute to work in mid- to upper-teen temperatures (*F) comfortably. The charging system never notices the heated gear, even with 50-watt halogen driving lamps on.

I wish the radio reception were better. I live in a rural area and work in a more rural area, so I lose my radio station half way to work, then I switch to my iPhone for podcasts or iTunes music.

I have 63,000 miles on mine. Other than regular maintenance, I had to replace the starter, but learned how to start the bike in a way that puts less strain on the starter. Also, the ABS brakes have not worked for some time, but regular brakes do work fine. Other than that, the bike has been trouble-free.

I’m sorry that I can’t compare with a GoldWing, but I hope that this information about how well the XCT works for touring and commuting will help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks RICZ for your response. I must agree with you about the utter mess of wires you have when taking the skin off of a GW. I felt a bit intimidated just watching a video on how to change the air filter on it!!! I am looking to do my own maintenance and I, admittedly, would be nervous about doing it. So, you have a very valid point. My point about parts stems from the fact that I plan to put an extensive amount of mileage on the bike, so, I'm sure, eventually, the need for parts will arise and I don't want to be left with a bike that I am unable to fix. Thank you for your input. You definitely made me think in a more in-depth manner. Not just the ride, but maintenance too.
From what I've gathered, fuel filters are the most difficult oem parts to get, but there are aftermarket companies that make them, or are at least starting to. At the same time, there are a couple of fellows on here that have 100,000 plus miles on their bikes and still have the original fuel filter.
Anyone on here reading this, correct me if I am wrong, but there aren't any companies making Vic drive belts, correct? I imagine in the coming years, someone will though...

In short, I wouldn't worry about parts for Victory bikes. They're bullet proof if you treat them halfway decent and they're built to effing last!
Thank you doobliss. It was good to hear of the longevity of the fuel filter and hopefully will never have issues with the drive belt.
 

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I have a Cross Roads and can be objective here because I have owned neither a CC or a GW, but I am intimate with the workings of both. Cutting to the chase, the Victory is a simpler bike, hence cheaper and easier to maintain/repair. Have you seen a GW1800 with the Tupperware removed? What a nightmare of electronics under there! In contrast, Vic Cross bikes are simplicity personified. I have been riding since I was 16 in 1952 and have had many bikes and did my own work. I have never had a bike so user friendly. In the 8 years I've had it, it has never been back to the shop. I never had a bike that one does not have to remove exhaust pipe(s) to remove the rear wheel, but you can with a Cross bike. Its like Polaris told the designers, make it like you are going to have to ride it and work on it.
As to riding; The Vic is not only infinitely more comfortable, it handles far better than a GW1800 - that I can attest to. For one thing, the front of the GW, as it comes, is crap and needs modding if you are going to ride twisties. The XCT has gobs more case capacity, the most in the industry.
Re parts; Many parts are also available from the aftermarket, but chances are excellent you won't need them - I never have.
One last thing; GWs are belly button bikes, everyone has one. I don't know about you, but I like being the only Vic rider in a sea of brand Xs. Nuff sed.

Yup, just last night on my way to Nashville while stopped for a bite to eat I met a life long GW rider. He couldn't get enough of my CCT. I literally had to apologize and say I had to get going as he clearly wanted to continue asking questions, looking at and telling me how my bike compares to his GW. At this time I have my trunk off and my CCT lowers exchanged for the forged bars and JTD inserts. I'm fairly certain he won't be going after the newest GW but will be seriously looking for a CC or a CCT.

I haven't had a GW since the first ones that came out which didn't have all the plastic. But I have had two Honda Valkyrie Interstates. IMH and very likely biased opinion, the Victory CC or CCT has it all over the GW. Any year GW. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I can’t compare because I don’t have experience with a GoldWing. I can tell you that the XCT is a capable tourer. My experience includes multi-hour rides going back to 1978 (started riding in 1977). My 2012 XCT has taken me from South Carolina to Indianapolis to Victorville, California and back, plus other shorter multi-hour rides. It is very good to be able to change foot positions. On the California trip, I rode four twelve-hour days going there and the same coming back, still comfortable at the end of each day, and that was two years after surgery for a broken vertebra in my lower back.

As an earlier poster said, the XCT has the most storage space in the industry. That is good not only for long touring, but also for commuting.

XCT comes with heated grips and heated seat, as well as a lot of upper and lower wind shielding. I own a heated jacket liner and heated gloves, so I added a jack to plug those in. I commute to work in mid- to upper-teen temperatures (*F) comfortably. The charging system never notices the heated gear, even with 50-watt halogen driving lamps on.

I wish the radio reception were better. I live in a rural area and work in a more rural area, so I lose my radio station half way to work, then I switch to my iPhone for podcasts or iTunes music.

I have 63,000 miles on mine. Other than regular maintenance, I had to replace the starter, but learned how to start the bike in a way that puts less strain on the starter. Also, the ABS brakes have not worked for some time, but regular brakes do work fine. Other than that, the bike has been trouble-free.

I’m sorry that I can’t compare with a GoldWing, but I hope that this information about how well the XCT works for touring and commuting will help you.
Thank you for your review Ahoutzer. The information about the multi-hour rides was very helpful, especially knowing that you had back surgery and was still able to ride it on your long trips.
The information about cold weather riding is most useful as that is one of my major concerns. I have heated clothing so I'm sure it would keep me toasty while riding. Is there any issues with the bike during cold riding (ie. sluggish response, electrical issues, etc.)?
I am a bit concerned about the need to replace the starter and problems with the ABS. The GW I am considering doesn't have ABS, so I wouldn't need to worry about that. Now, trying to replace a starter on a Wing might be tricky.
Thanks for your great review.
 

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From what I've gathered, fuel filters are the most difficult oem parts to get, but there are aftermarket companies that make them, or are at least starting to. At the same time, there are a couple of fellows on here that have 100,000 plus miles on their bikes and still have the original fuel filter.
Anyone on here reading this, correct me if I am wrong, but there aren't any companies making Vic drive belts, correct? I imagine in the coming years, someone will though...

In short, I wouldn't worry about parts for Victory bikes. They're bullet proof if you treat them halfway decent and they're built to effing last!
Drive belts....

http://www.victoryforums.com/showthread.php?t=193185

Andre using TaPaTaLk
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you Chatanooga Mark. Admiration is a great testament to a well made bike, especially from a Honda or Harley owner.
 

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Having ridden a CCT, Goldwing, Voyager XII and my current Vision I can say the CCT/Vision rides much better than the Goldwing partially because they corner better and the front suspension is a better design however the Goldwing wins in the smooth and quiet department, after a long ride the V Twin does make for a louder ride.
 

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My son rides a 2012 GW that he bought new. He likes it a lot (with over 30,00 miles on it) but it's a real pain to get to ANYTHING to work on himself. He did a test ride of the Victory CCT and really liked it cause he can reach the ground with his short legs, and the comfort of ride, handling etc........He has to tip toe to touch ground with the GW. Now he's eyeing the BMW K 1600 Grand America. Nice bike but real Expensive. He's just jealous of dad's CCT...:grin
 

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I have 63,000 miles on mine. Other than regular maintenance, I had to replace the starter, but learned how to start the bike in a way that puts less strain on the starter. Also, the ABS brakes have not worked for some time, but regular brakes do work fine. Other than that, the bike has been trouble-free.
How are you starting your bike? Is there more than cracking the throttle a little before holding the button?

I looked at the Goldwing before I bought my CCT and could not get passed the riding position.
 

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I currently have over 40,000 miles on my XCT. Prior to that, I put over 53,000 miles on a 2002 GL1800.

Goldwing Pros:
- Electric-like power. Can go from 30-100+ in 5th gear without needing to shift. Smooth, on-demand power.
- Reliability. With basic maintenance (oil, brakes, fluids), they just run. No drama.
- Parts and Accessory Availability. There are many more Goldwings out there than Vics.

Goldwing Cons:
- Working on interior things. To replace an air filter, I had to remove the seat, tank cover, inner fairing and radio before I can get to the air filter.
- Riding position. Because the engine is so wide, there really isn't any place to stretch out, unless you install highway bars. But then, you're sitting spread-eagle like you're on a Boss Hoss. No comfy medium.

Victory Pros:
- Reliability.
- V-Twin power
- Looks (in my opinion)
- Much room to stretch out and get comfy.
- Easy to work on
- Great handling
- Huge storage (for my XCT, that is)

Victory Cons:
- Parts availability (fuel filters, tho that seems to not be an issue now).
- Not the most familiar bike out there
- Dealer support is lackluster (unless you have a great dealer close by). Good thing I don't need it because I have you guys!

I am sure there are some that I missed, and other's experiences may vary.
 

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look for a cc with trunk. Even if you don't like it in long run it will sell your bike. Make sure you get owners book. There is specific way to check oil. You have to hold bike vertical screw in dipstick and unscrew it to get reading. Engeneries were on vacation when they came up with this one. You can do bluetooth for music. I would skip goldwing and look at Yamaha.

Good Luck on whatever you chose
 

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I, too, like the looks of the new Yamaha. I have yet to sit on one, but the reviews I have seen all say it has great torque but not much up top - kinda like Harley. I hear it's roomy, but then only I can make that distinction for myself.
 

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I, too, like the looks of the new Yamaha. I have yet to sit on one, but the reviews I have seen all say it has great torque but not much up top - kinda like Harley. I hear it's roomy, but then only I can make that distinction for myself.
Its roomy but sits lower to the ground so cornering will not be as good as our Victory's. Its got all the comforts of a Goldwing though.
 

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The new Yamaha (as most of the old ones) has a low payload capacity. I think it's 408 lbs.

The Goldwing is hard to beat. Unless you're a really big guy you should be plenty comfortable on it. Maybe you can play V-Twin engine sounds through the stereo...
 

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Maybe you can play V-Twin engine sounds through the stereo...
The stereo on mine wasn't great. The newer ones might be better. Still need a few good speakers and amps for that v-Twin sound.
 
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