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Discussion Starter #1
Searched under fuel /gas filter a few times cant find what I was looking for.
My 2010 Vegas just passed 25,000 miles, my manual on a disc(2012)
states a fuel filter change at 25,000...sure I've seen on here somewhere at 30,000 mile.
Either way its coming up soon so a couple of questions.

To those that have changed theirs already.
Apart from not breaking the fuel nipple under the tank when removing it, do you have any other tips, and stuff to watch out for?
What parts will I need?...presuming the filter setup and tank gasket.
Any links to prices on those U.S. before I get a shock on the prices Australian?

I love racking up the miles on my Vegas , more than any other bike I've owned, only catch is maintenance, I don't want to let slide on the really important stuff.
Theres the fuel filters to do , and rear shock lube,
Fork oil and steering head bearings will be due soon...how vital are these to be freshened as bikes still steering and handling fine.

Right now the in tank fuel filter is my primary concern and wont know how filthy they are till they're out....engines pulling great no sign of fuel starvation.

Any help from those that have already completed this task will be greatly appreciated.
 

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Just did this on mine last week. Took about 20 minutes.

1) Start with your fuel tank on empty then siphon out all you can.

2) Remove the tank and place it upside down on a towel.

3) Remove the bolts from around the fuel pump assembly.

4) Lift the front of the pump assembly and stick a couple finger between it and the tank. Feel for and press on a hose that slightly overlaps the front of the pump assembly (not doing this may results in breakage).

5) Once the assembly is out you will see a white adapter connected to the end of the fuel pump that is held on by a round metal clip. Use a small flat screwdriver placed between the fuel pump and the fuel filter adapter to rock the clip off.

6) To install the new filter place the filter adapter on the fuel pump and put the metal clip on (new filter will come with a new clip). Find a socket that is slightly smaller than the clip, hold the socket on the clip and tap the opposite end with a hammer or wrench until it is flush with the adapter.

7) Remove old gasket and replace with new gasket.

8) Reinstall the pump assembly in the tank and make sure none on the wires (fuel pump wires and fuel level sending unit wires) are caught between the pump assembly and the tank.

9) Reinstall the mounting bolts snugly (there may be a specified torque but I didn't look for it), connect the wiring/fuel line and reinstall your tank.

10) Add fuel and ride
 

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Subscribed and THANKS
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks,
I found a witchdoctors vid on an early model, up to 07 tank but from the sound of your description ammo_umb there must be a change in the tank design and how you access the pump.
Did you take any pix at all?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
All Good!...there is definitly a difference between ours and the early tank, just found it in my manual on disc, fairly detailed with pix, between that and ammo's description I should be okay.
Just need to source the filters and gasket now?
 

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Just did this on mine last week. Took about 20 minutes.

1) Start with your fuel tank on empty then siphon out all you can.

2) Remove the tank and place it upside down on a towel.

3) Remove the bolts from around the fuel pump assembly.

4) Lift the front of the pump assembly and stick a couple finger between it and the tank. Feel for and press on a hose that slightly overlaps the front of the pump assembly (not doing this may results in breakage).

5) Once the assembly is out you will see a white adapter connected to the end of the fuel pump that is held on by a round metal clip. Use a small flat screwdriver placed between the fuel pump and the fuel filter adapter to rock the clip off.

6) To install the new filter place the filter adapter on the fuel pump and put the metal clip on (new filter will come with a new clip). Find a socket that is slightly smaller than the clip, hold the socket on the clip and tap the opposite end with a hammer or wrench until it is flush with the adapter.

7) Remove old gasket and replace with new gasket.

8) Reinstall the pump assembly in the tank and make sure none on the wires (fuel pump wires and fuel level sending unit wires) are caught between the pump assembly and the tank.

9) Reinstall the mounting bolts snugly (there may be a specified torque but I didn't look for it), connect the wiring/fuel line and reinstall your tank.

10) Add fuel and ride
This is an excellent tutorial will just add the Manual says replace the bolts which I did and the cost was very little .. May not be necessary, but did it because was easy enough to do without spending any big bucks to do so .. Replaced mine at 30,000 and was not bad but still plan on doing again at 60,000 ..
 

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No pictures available.

Also for pricing you are sure to be shocked because the filters are ridiculously priced in CONUS. Mine was around $80 USD which is close to 4 times what it should cost.

In order to save some cash next time I'm looking at modding an automotive filter. The OEM is folded in half and the ends are plastic welded so if I can find one the same length with a similar sized outlet I'll connect the ends and attach the OEM hose and adapter.
 

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mate, was your filter dirty ? I mean not just color dirty but NOT LETTING enough fuel trough DIRTY????

I have wondered about this and posted about this .....

what would happen if removing the filter ALL from the tank and just putting a high-pressure in-line filter into the system ???

the pump would be FINE as there will be NO debris in any petrol station in the world who could not handle the fuel pump of Victory ???
 

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Just did this on mine last week. Took about 20 minutes.

1) Start with your fuel tank on empty then siphon out all you can.

2) Remove the tank and place it upside down on a towel.

3) Remove the bolts from around the fuel pump assembly.

4) Lift the front of the pump assembly and stick a couple finger between it and the tank. Feel for and press on a hose that slightly overlaps the front of the pump assembly (not doing this may results in breakage).

5) Once the assembly is out you will see a white adapter connected to the end of the fuel pump that is held on by a round metal clip. Use a small flat screwdriver placed between the fuel pump and the fuel filter adapter to rock the clip off.

6) To install the new filter place the filter adapter on the fuel pump and put the metal clip on (new filter will come with a new clip). Find a socket that is slightly smaller than the clip, hold the socket on the clip and tap the opposite end with a hammer or wrench until it is flush with the adapter.

7) Remove old gasket and replace with new gasket.

8) Reinstall the pump assembly in the tank and make sure none on the wires (fuel pump wires and fuel level sending unit wires) are caught between the pump assembly and the tank.

9) Reinstall the mounting bolts snugly (there may be a specified torque but I didn't look for it), connect the wiring/fuel line and reinstall your tank.

10) Add fuel and ride
After reading Wes Dalton's experience, I was thinking of taking mine to the shop for this. He noted that paint had peeled off beneath where the fuel nozzle fits in the tank. The paint then clogged his up. He got his tank replaced.

I looked in mine and I see the same peeling. If it's going to be a constant issue that ends up killing fuel pumps, then I'll try to see what kind of response I get via my 4 year warranty. Bout time I got around to issuing a claim on it anyway.
 

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this is about changing fuel pump but you do all mosy all of it to get to the fuel filters
 

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Rylan says not matter what you have you need to replace filters or buy new fuel pump
 

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alternative filter

prolly a fitment from a car that works, the very sharp Forchetto on the TriumphRat forum keeps us informed with less costly fitments for our bonnies
 

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My filter looked about the same color as a used coffee filter and its been in for close to 37000 miles. I didn't have any paint peel inside my tank and I most likely get fuel from the same sources as Wes Dalton. I also didn't notice any paint chips or other large residue on the filter itself (other than a dead hornet that most likely wasn't in there long).

Replacing the filter with an inline could cause premature pump failure unless you pump your gas through a pre filter ever time you fuel up. You would most likely also notice that your engine would stall out when your tank is low because the fuel filter sits on the bottom in the back end of the tank. Basically the last 1-1.5" of fuel in your tank would do nothing to keep the engine running.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
@VisionJohnny that vid is for the early tank, like the witchdoctors vid I found it doesnt pertain to 08 up tank.
Very good for early bikes though.
Surprised theres none for the later bikes that most of us own and ride.
Ill ring Vic today and see what the price shock is...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
You fellas get out of it cheap over in the U.S.A.!
In Aust. The filter is $166 .

Just as well its only every 30,000 miles.

We got another group ride Sept 21 out of Brisbane.

Asked Rob about when the new Scouts come in here, not till end if the year but theyve already sold ten!
 

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filters + pumps

like in cars + trucks a very dirty + restrictive filter makes the fuel pump work harder which can shorten its life
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Dang that works out to $154.81 USD. Glad to know everywhere I've been overseas the conversion worked out better!

Also here's an example of a pre filter.

http://www.qualitycycleparts.com/Profill_in_tank_fuel_pre_filters_starting_at_25_0_p/ultra-mk2.htm
yeah mate you've got it good at $80

those pre filters look like a good thing too...no listing for Vic, all listings for dirt bikes, though I suppose as long as the filler neck is the right diameter....know anyone running one?
 
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