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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have a quick way of checking and/or filling the air in the rear tire of a CCT? At home is one thing where as you can remove a saddlebag to have better access, but if out on the road and maybe in inclement weather is another.

Thanks in advance.
 

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TPMS...The only thing lacking when you use a TPMS is a physical check of the tire. I LOVE my Tire Safe-Guard.
 

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I usually take the left bag off. Not a lot of effort or time there, unless the bag is loaded.

but, uh...make sure you get it secured properly when you're done :D
 

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Lay on the ground on the right side of the bike. Access the valve stem by reaching under the saddlebag. Check pressure and add if necessary. Stand up and dust off.
 

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I plan on installing a 90 degree air valve at the next tire change. That'll make checking and airing much easier. BTW, I too have the TireGard TPMS.
 

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A 90 degree air valve is badly needed on these bikes. Checking and filling with my compressor is a pain because of the angle to get to the valves. As far as the back tire I just do like ammo said, lay down and check it and then go riding.
 

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As GatorJoe posted, (near) right-angle stems would help. I used the stems he linked to on my Burgman.

In the meantime or instead of that, on my XCT, I find that this hose extension -- http://www.stopngo.com/10-inch-mini-air-compressor-hose-extension/ -- from Stop & Go to be the cat's meow for checking or adding air to the rear tire.

This particular extension is:

- Only $8;
- Very easy to screw on and unscrew from the valve stem, because it has a big, knurled, female connector end;
- Makes positive and quick connection or removal, i.e., it doesn't spew tons of air from the stock valve while connecting or disconnecting it.

Of course, you still have to get on the ground to connect and disconnect it, but at least you don't have to stay on the ground after that, when using your tire gauge or air pump. I carry it in a saddlebag.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
As GatorJoe posted, (near) right-angle stems would help. I used the stems he linked to on my Burgman.

In the meantime or instead of that, on my XCT, I find that this hose extension -- http://www.stopngo.com/10-inch-mini-air-compressor-hose-extension/ -- from Stop & Go to be the cat's meow for checking or adding air to the rear tire.

This particular extension is:

- Only $8;
- Very easy to screw on and unscrew from the valve stem, because it has a big, knurled, female connector end;
- Makes positive and quick connection or removal, i.e., it doesn't spew tons of air from the stock valve while connecting or disconnecting it.

Of course, you still have to get on the ground to connect and disconnect it, but at least you don't have to stay on the ground after that, when using your tire gauge or air pump. I carry it in a saddlebag.
After last night, this extension is most definitely on the "order now" to do list. The little 3-4" hose that is on the compressor is as good as "tits on a boar", particularly when messing with the rear tire (even with the saddle bags off.

Thanks
Elliot
 

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Discussion Starter #10
All,

As a side note to this topic; who has a STOP n GO portable air compressor? I tried using mine last night, and it came on just fine when plugged into any of my 12v outlets, however when I screwed it on to either tire, I got no air being pumped into the tires. The gauge just stayed at 0. My front tire was only down like 2psi, and left it on for almost 10min, no joy. My rear tire was down quite a bit, so I left it on for 15min, no joy. Yes, I ensured the hose was on securely, and yes I pushed the yellow "on" button.

Any ideas? May have to return it. Does anyone use a different brand compressor they use/recommend?

Thanks
Elliot
 

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All,

As a side note to this topic; who has a STOP n GO portable air compressor? I tried using mine last night, and it came on just fine when plugged into any of my 12v outlets, however when I screwed it on to either tire, I got no air being pumped into the tires. The gauge just stayed at 0. My front tire was only down like 2psi, and left it on for almost 10min, no joy. My rear tire was down quite a bit, so I left it on for 15min, no joy. Yes, I ensured the hose was on securely, and yes I pushed the yellow "on" button.

Any ideas? May have to return it. Does anyone use a different brand compressor they use/recommend?

Thanks
Elliot
Given that I live a couple of miles from a Harbor Freight, I use this to add air to the tires in the garage: http://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-100-psi-high-volume-air-compressor-69284.html . It's got good oomph, and is easier than dragging out my plug-in-the-wall real air compressor. I carry this on the bike: http://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-250-psi-compact-air-compressor-4077.html . I got it on sale for $5 a few years ago, have used it occasionally, it's very small, and it works.

The one suggestion I have is to check that your compressor is plugged in well. That is, did you push the male connector firmly into the bike's 12V socket when this happened, and then maybe rotate it a bit when it was in the socket? I'm not familiar with the S&G compressor -- is there some way to see that it's getting power, during those times when it doesn't seem to be doing diddly squat?
 

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I removed the plastic encasement from one of those cheap, but more powerful, compressors you get at auto suppliers or Harbor Freight Tools for $6. Replaced the cigarette lighter plug with an SAE connector, so I can hook it up to the battery pigtail and installed a Gilbert switch on the cord near the motor, so I can turn it on and off without unplugging it. Its packed into a compact camera case along with a Dyna-Plug kit and always in a saddlebag.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Given that I live a couple of miles from a Harbor Freight, I use this to add air to the tires in the garage: http://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-100-psi-high-volume-air-compressor-69284.html . It's got good oomph, and is easier than dragging out my plug-in-the-wall real air compressor. I carry this on the bike: http://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-250-psi-compact-air-compressor-4077.html . I got it on sale for $5 a few years ago, have used it occasionally, it's very small, and it works.

The one suggestion I have is to check that your compressor is plugged in well. That is, did you push the male connector firmly into the bike's 12V socket when this happened, and then maybe rotate it a bit when it was in the socket? I'm not familiar with the S&G compressor -- is there some way to see that it's getting power, during those times when it doesn't seem to be doing diddly squat?
Thanks, will take a look at your links.
FYI, on the S&G compressor, when you plug it in there is a LED light and power switch to confirm it's got good juice from the source.

I've been in communication with S&G, and they're sending a new one out to me today, and because of the inconvenience, they're sending me a 10" extension hose, all at no cost to me; and I don't even need to ship the bad one back to them.

All I got to say is, OUTSTANDING Customer Service, and a Company that stands behind their products. Hard to find in this day and age.
 

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Lay on the ground on the right side of the bike. Access the valve stem by reaching under the saddlebag. Check pressure and add if necessary. Stand up and dust off.
Ditto that thumb up
I hate taking off my bag and setting it on the pavement. Too easy to scratch it up....especially if it is full. Now if it's raining....well...that's another story.
 
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