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I rode my usual 25 miles to work this morning and it was low/mid 30s and the engine oil temp didn't even reach 150. Does it really matter?
or should I block off 1/2 of the cooler? I had an old 79' Shovelhead I used to block the cooler off on it during the winter but it was designed to be only air cooled without a cooler where the Vic isn't. Seems weird they don't put a thermostat on them.
 

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back when Vic came out with the 92's they found the oil wouldn't get hot enough so they made the cooler smaller.
Yes I think your hurting your bike not getting the oil warm enough.
Tell me how do you know its warm enough to leave the drive way
 

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I block my cooler off as much as i can when it gets cold. My old bike would get milky oil from not getting hot enough.

I let mine warm up enough to get my helmet and gloves on, make sure the throttle responds and go. My first mile is slow gravel so its a good warm up.

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back when Vic came out with the 92's they found the oil wouldn't get hot enough so they made the cooler smaller.
Yes I think your hurting your bike not getting the oil warm enough.
Tell me how do you know its warm enough to leave the drive way
I'll start by blocking off 1/2 the cooler. I didn't have a temp guage last year. I searched for a thermostat to add on and nothing, I bet if someone came out with one they would sell a lot of them.

I block my cooler off as much as i can when it gets cold. My old bike would get milky oil from not getting hot enough.

I let mine warm up enough to get my helmet and gloves on, make sure the throttle responds and go. My first mile is slow gravel so its a good warm up.

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Same here it runs a couple minutes.
 

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I'll see where it runs in the morning.

 

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Hot Bike !

There is a good article in the Jan 14 edition of Hot Bike. It's called Hot Sparks. It relates mostly to ignition upgrades but also states that most riders don't give their bikes enough warm up time in cold weather. Jamie Hanson From "Speeds Performance Plus" had this to say:

"Besides barely giving that bike enough time to build up oil pressure, bad enough on a late model EFI bike. "That get up and go is pretty much a guarantee for fouled plugs, black as coal!" "The computer is still in its warm up mode." "It's like riding off with the choke full on."

Commuting 25 miles one would think the oil could reach normal or close to normal temp. At least 200 degrees by the time you get to 10 miles or so. I never rode a bike in 30 degree weather though so I cant help with a suggestion other than trying a longer warm up time. Let's say 10 min. Blocking the oil cooler is a good idea. Out of curiosity what are you measuring the oil temp with?
 

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cover the hole cooler top bottom sides its not going to hurt in colder weather. Maybe wrap it in leather.
With your bare hand put it on rear cylinder and feel the heat of the cylinder. When it gets warm to the touch cylinder and head your motor might be ready to go.
You know if the motor doesn't warm up enough you can blow out a cylinder base gasket.
 

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There is a good article in the Jan 14 edition of Hot Bike. It's called Hot Sparks. It relates mostly to ignition upgrades but also states that most riders don't give their bikes enough warm up time in cold weather. Jamie Hanson From "Speeds Performance Plus" had this to say:

"Besides barely giving that bike enough time to build up oil pressure, bad enough on a late model EFI bike. "That get up and go is pretty much a guarantee for fouled plugs, black as coal!" "The computer is still in its warm up mode." "It's like riding off with the choke full on."

Commuting 25 miles one would think the oil could reach normal or close to normal temp. At least 200 degrees by the time you get to 10 miles or so. I never rode a bike in 30 degree weather though so I cant help with a suggestion other than trying a longer warm up time. Let's say 10 min. Blocking the oil cooler is a good idea. Out of curiosity what are you measuring the oil temp with?
It's just on of those dip stick gauges and I know they aren't very accurate but they do give you an idea.

cover the hole cooler top bottom sides its not going to hurt in colder weather. Maybe wrap it in leather.
With your bare hand put it on rear cylinder and feel the heat of the cylinder. When it gets warm to the touch cylinder and head your motor might be ready to go.
You know if the motor doesn't warm up enough you can blow out a cylinder base gasket.
Being garage kept it's not that cold in the morning startup my garage is probably 40 and after work it's in the 50-60 range.
 

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Mine is garage kept also, and my old bike, that would get milky oil, my ride was 35 miles one way, running at 4500 rpms tge whole way, with a laser temp gun would show 150-160°oil temps when it waa cold out. I never checked my xc temp.

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I just went 30 give or take and it hit 210 but it's 45 outside.
 

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Might have to cage it on the 30* days. I don't blame you though I would ride to work every day if I could.
 

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I'm glad you guys are talking about this. I ride my bike a minimum of once every two weeks, and have noticed the temperature only getting up to 200 degrees the last time I road it. I may have to block off my oil cooler a little bit the next time I take it out.
 

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While monitoring the temperature of the oil is important... mostly in situations that would overheat your engine... the viscosity of a multigrade oil takes care of most cold weather riding.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) provides viscosity ratings at both 0 degrees F and 200 degrees F. A "W" after a number indicating your oil's grade will inform you of what the viscosity is at 0 degrees F. The "W" stands for "winter," rather than "weight."

At 0 degrees your oil is performing as a 10W weight... plenty of lubrication to run your engine... at 30 degrees your viscosity has already increased from 10W weight. Even better in winter is to run a 5W weight... colder start ups with thinner oil.
 

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While monitoring the temperature of the oil is important... mostly in situations that would overheat your engine... the viscosity of a multigrade oil takes care of most cold weather riding.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) provides viscosity ratings at both 0 degrees F and 200 degrees F. A "W" after a number indicating your oil's grade will inform you of what the viscosity is at 0 degrees F. The "W" stands for "winter," rather than "weight."

At 0 degrees your oil is performing as a 10W weight... plenty of lubrication to run your engine... at 30 degrees your viscosity has already increased from 10W weight. Even better in winter is to run a 5W weight... colder start ups with thinner oil.

You make a good point, but I think we are on a different page. You see I don't store my bike in winter like many do. I ride year round. If it's too cold the bike sits and I think one of the problems is it develops condensation in the oil. So I make it a point to ride it at least once every two weeks. I do my truck the same way. It keeps the battery charged and the condensation evaporated out of the oil. So having the engine get hot enough to do that make sense to me. Wasn't that one of the problems with the early Vic's is that they wouldn't get hot enough.
 
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