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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, first I'll introduce myself. My name is Scott and I live in upstate NY. I have never owned or purchased a motorcycle before, however I've ridden and had a great interest in them for years now. When I saw the 2013 Victory Judge, it was love at first sight! Especially since I have always had a soft spot for the 1969 GTO of the same moniker. My questions pertain to buying a bike. Does one "haggle" or is the price set? If there is wiggle room, what is reasonable to ask off the price? I have zero problem with anybody making a profit, however I like to keep a little in my pocket whenever possible. Thank you very much for your replies. Hopefully I'll be talking shop with all of you in the near future! cheers
 

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Hello all, first I'll introduce myself. My name is Scott and I live in upstate NY. I have never owned or purchased a motorcycle before, however I've ridden and had a great interest in them for years now. When I saw the 2013 Victory Judge, it was love at first sight! Especially since I have always had a soft spot for the 1969 GTO of the same moniker. My questions pertain to buying a bike. Does one "haggle" or is the price set? If there is wiggle room, what is reasonable to ask off the price? I have zero problem with anybody making a profit, however I like to keep a little in my pocket whenever possible. Thank you very much for your replies. Hopefully I'll be talking shop with all of you in the near future! cheers
I hope you seriously consider buying something else as your very first street bike.

The 106 powered Victory is a VERY powerful bike. It is also a fairly heavy bike. Until you've learned the basics, these two things can turn a simple "oops" in the learning curve to a hospital visit.

Aside from the very obvious safety issues and learning curve... a large amount of 1st time riders drop their bikes (like simple stuff... forgetting to put the kickstand down, or not knowing that hitting your front brake with the forks turned will drop the bike like a lead weight)... or will lay it down in an accident. Do you really want to drop your beautiful new dream bike??? Buy a very cheap, used bike to learn on. Then when you have at least the basics mastered... sell it (learner bikes always sell easily and usually for about the same amount you paid for it because everyone needs one like you did), and then buy your dream bike. NOTHING will suck worse than watching your awesome new dream machine go down and suffer damage. Especially if you still make payments on it :cool:


Go find a small CC bike like a Rebel 250 to learn on. While a bike of any size can either kill you, or can be "treated with respect regardless of how powerful it is"... the simple truth is that any sketchy situation will be greatly amplified with a bike that has more power, stickier brakes, etc. Until you learn throttle control, a 106 is a very bad choice. Until you learn the basics of turning, braking, panic stops etc... you should be on a 250 or a 500 at most.

Also, be sure to take the MSF safety course before you even consider buying any bike.


Enjoy the lifestyle the right way, and you're likely to enjoy it longer, and with more enthusiasm. cheers
 

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Welcome to the forum, Scott!

...Does one "haggle" or is the price set?...
The price is never set in stone, even if the salesman leads you to believe so. Always negotiate, and to test how well you've done, walk away from the deal, and sleep on it. Don't worry, they dealer will welcome you back the next day with a smile and open arms. thumb up

I hope you seriously consider buying something else as your very first street bike.
And I hope Scott does not get swayed by naysayers. There is no proof that starting with a smaller bike is better. If that were the case, everybody would start with 50cc mopeds. Be mature when you ride, and take a safety course before you purchase. It could save your life.
 

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The Judge is a sweet machine. Test ride one, it's free! With it's low saddle height and low CG, it handles well. Very similar to my Kingpin. Certainly go easy on the throttle as faster acceleration can get you into trouble faster.

In terms of price, I shopped online and visited several 'local' dealers. Oh, and going on a test ride with the Factory Truck will provide you with $1000 coupon for accessories. My '08 Kingpin was bought new for $10K and I cashed in a $1000 accessory coupon. My dreaming lasted over 1 1/2 years while I waited for improved employment, so I had lots of time to shop!
 

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And I hope Scott does not get swayed by naysayers. There is no proof that starting with a smaller bike is better. If that were the case, everybody would start with 50cc mopeds. Be mature when you ride, and take a safety course before you purchase. It could save your life.
Once again, I say the sky is blue, you absolutely must say it is black. :rolleyes:


I won't bother to bicker, I'll continue to use common sense and help others with useful information.
 

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Once again, I say the sky is blue, you absolutely must say it is black. :rolleyes:
I apologize for having a different opinion than you. Please forgive me.

I won't bother to bicker, I'll continue to use common sense and help others with useful information.
You won't bicker, you'll just complain. Sweet! :clap:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I appreciate the advice on starting small. I had my head in the clouds and that grounded me. I did think about the fact that I've never ridden a large displacement bike previously, and it sure would suck as you said, to see my beautiful brand new bike all banged up due to lack of experience. I guess I should slow down, considering I don't even have a license. I obtained my permit several years ago, but let it expire. For this I have to say thank you for interjecting common sense back into my game. I'd still like to hear from everybody that has something to say on the topic however. Thank you! thumb up
 

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Hi Scott,

Mark here from western Vermont. Hows it going? I rode a Bright Red Judge last week at the Demo truck in Rutland Vermont. Nice bike. Not for me tho (don't care for the way the controls are set up) I would cry if i bought one, and then dropped it due to inexperience. Spend a summer on a bike that you have not invested a lot in, and if you drop it- you can walk away- having learned something, only out a few bucks, and not having a large repair bill.

m
 

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Welcome to the board and to motorcycles.
Price? Never say never, but dealers have room and if they don't, get some extras and install as part of the deal. Some that won't bargain will do that. Everyone is different.
I have seen a judge, it looks like a mid size and probably handles as such. Despite common belief in some places, a 106 is not powerfull. It can get the job done just fine, but can't be fast or "powerfull". Perception is everything.
Now for what you didn't ask for. Keep your attitude at home if you have one. You bought a bike, big deal. There are 10's of thousands of "owners" that only put a couple thousand a year if that, but have all kinds of "experience", hardley. Wear DOT at minimum certified helmet, and the more it covers, the more you get to keep. Wear proper riding gear, jeans and a t-shirt are for after you park it. Take a MSF riding course, and practice what you learned on your bike until you get it down without thinking. THEN you are ready for a road ride. Too many tell folks that don't know any better that slow handling won't help on the Street. BS! If you can't do it slow you can't do it fast. Any idiot can go fast and straight. Be your own best friend. If you bought the bike to look cool, think what learning to ride it can do for you.
Little things keep you alive and no ammount of dirt, car, train or flight experience can teach you how to survive blue hairs pulling out in front of you, but a riding course will give you basics, then you have to take it from there.
Enjoy the ride and good luck on the purchase.
 

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I started on a Honda CX500 purchased for $650. Six years and 15,000 miles later, I sold it for $650. Invested in new tires, new battery, and carb cleaning.

Felt I could have ridden my wife's Honda Shadow 750 home for her with just the little experience I had on a Bridgestone 100 when I was 14.

My Honda had a tall seat and was top heavy, even though it was a 500CC bike. The only thing that ever put me down was a foot wide swath of oil on a turn.

Whatever path you choose, ride before you buy!
 

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If you start small and find that you do actually enjoy riding then it will not be very long at all and you will realize you wish you had gotten a bigger bike. It happens all the time. The main thing I ever suggest to new riders is to not get a crotch rocket for their first bike. The 106 has some power but it is by no means an oh my powerhouse and is certainly not VERY powerful, but that is only my opinion. I have ridden some VERY powerful bikes and this aint one of them.

As others have stated, take advantage of the free test rides and decide for yourself before you pull the trigger on anything. The bike that you fell in love with meets all things to consider for a first, short seat, low center of gravity and it handles well. Put your feet down when you stop and lift them up when you take off.

Again, only my opinions.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Again, lots of good advice. Just for the record, I am 38 years old and have no desire to go like hell. I know I sounded like a young buck with my first post, but I do have *some* :rolleyes: common sense and have absolutely no interest in crotch rockets or speed bikes. When I was younger I considered them, but was actually quite intimidated by their power at the same time, hence why I never bought one. The first time I went shopping for a bike, I found an absolutely mint 1983 Honda Shadow 750, and that is where my appreciation and love affair for the cruiser style started. I would have absolutely no problem owning one of these or a early to late 90's Vulcan or Virago. I think I'll check out Craigslist! :D
 

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Take a course. Living in fear sucks. Buy your dream bike, take a course and practice in parking lots, lightly traveled roads etc. have fun

BTW Victory has a smooth power band nothing like a sport bike
 

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I appreciate the advice on starting small. I had my head in the clouds and that grounded me. I did think about the fact that I've never ridden a large displacement bike previously, and it sure would suck as you said, to see my beautiful brand new bike all banged up due to lack of experience. I guess I should slow down, considering I don't even have a license. I obtained my permit several years ago, but let it expire. For this I have to say thank you for interjecting common sense back into my game. I'd still like to hear from everybody that has something to say on the topic however. Thank you! thumb up
DO NOT start small. IMHO, BanditSRT is just simply wrong on this advice. I was like you little more than a year ago. I never rode AT ALL other than a few days one summer on a mini bike @ a farm when I was 7 years old. I bought a Ness XC as my first bike in April of '11 & have not had any problems nor have I "dropped it"...yet.

I think this is a personal thing that YOU have to work out for yourself. Buy a bike YOU are comfortable with, not that others may tell you to buy. There really is NO POINT in buying a smallish 750 and then HATING it and never getting a REAL bike. If your intelligent and even somewhat athletic, you CAN ride a nice big Victory, Harley, whatever with NO PROBLEMS AT ALL. Make CERTAIN you DO take the MSFT course BEFORE you buy ANYTHING though. You NEED that endorsement in order to demo bikes.

Price - ALL dealer's WILL negotiate off of MSRP. Some just don't like to do it. The reality is that bikes are EXACTLY like ANY other commodity and if one dealer won't discount, the next one will. In order to help you understand the potential I will offer this. You can buy CURRENT year bikes as much as 20% off list price (add all accessories to the bikes price and then discount). Most are getting from $2K to $4K off a $20K bike. You can pretty much ALWAYS get $1K off ANY bike simply by taking a demo ride so the MINIMUM off MSRP is $1K off. I don't know of ANYONE who has paid FULL MSRP for a Victory. Harley dealer's would like you to think that they NEVER discount but I found $3,100 off their Road Glide Ultra's at the end of the season this year for a buddy of mine so you CAN get a discount on ANY bike.

PS - With you on the classic Goats. I am more of a 60's Vette guy myself but about a year ago I came inches away from buying an authentic Judge body/frame (for about $8K) but decided I had enough projects at the time. Good Guys IS coming to Charlotte in a few weeks though so....

PPS - IMHO the Judge doesn't ride well. Lock to lock steering is stunted. You ALWAYS have to lean WAY forward when riding, etc. Maybe it's great on a track but honestly, how many of us are 'tracking" our rides? I guess I am simply more of a laid-back cruiser/touring bike kinda guy instead of the kind that wants to aggressively attack EVERY corner. You can STILL be aggressive with the Cross Country platform, just won't be dragging any knees on it.
 

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The only possible problem that a new ride would have with a Victory motorcycle would be the weight.
With such a wide throttle range and slow and smooth power onset, there is no way that the 106 will surprise anyone. The large throttle range is perfect for the new guys.

If the weight of the bike is not an issue then the Judge is the perfect bike for you. IMO buy what you want!!!
 

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I started small virago 535, IM 6'5 250 back then. Did 1000 miles, sold it a bit more than I bought it for. Bought a royalstar, now a kingpin. Definitely get a a smaller bike, mind too small and it will be screaming doing 60 like mine. Might have been crying cause my fat ass. Was on it. Enjoy learn well, take msf course, ride safe and taste some bugs. How far upstate, I'm in North Jersey. My dealer is locomotion power sports in Suffern great guys.

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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First of all, take the MSF course then buy the bike you want. You'll be fine. If you don't, sooner than you think you'll be trying to kick your own ass for not buying what you wanted in the first place. My advice is to buy a set of highway/crash bars. Even if you drop it a time or two, chances are it's going to be at a stop or a crawl and the only thing that will happen is the exhaust pipes may get scratched, or the handlebar grips may get scuffed up. My 125lb. wife's first bike she bought and learned on was a Honda VTX1300C, just as big as the Judge, and more top heavy. First thing I did was installed a set of highway/crash bars. She dropped it a couple of times. After she got the hang of it we installed some aftermarket slip-on exhaust and new grips and it was better than new. Chances are you're going to make those changes anyway, and more. She now has a Vegas.

Now on to original Question, There is always room to negotiate. The internet is your friend. Look for the best price, then go in and "haggle away".

BTW, we used that $1000.00 accessory voucher that you get when you test ride the Vics for an additional $750.00 off the purchase price.

Good luck, and Ride Safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Thanks again to all who replied. I fully intended on getting a little experience under my belt by taking the course. In fact it was never an option for me. I don't know if it works the same in other states, but here my local course qualifies you to get your license without taking the road test. It's a 3-day, 18 hour course and you get a waiver from the course instructor that you give to the DMV, they take your pic and your license comes in the mail. I also plan on watching the "Ride Like a Pro" DVD's a bunch of times. I am a physically fit guy so a big bike won't be a problem for me as far as weight goes. By the way, I don't feel that anyone who says to start small is wrong by any stretch. I think they are simply trying to encourage the sport and make it more enjoyable by manipulating the learning curve in the new riders favor. Because there is so much to learn and so many skills that must be mastered all at once, I think that is very good advice. On one hand, don't spend a lot in case you mess up and dump it or crash, which most likely will happen. I've heard that it's not a question of if you dump your bike, but when. That way you're not out a lot of money AND you've gained valuable experience. On the other hand, buy a really nice bike and it might encourage you to ride more and be more careful while you're at it without diminishing the experience and not getting discouraged by constantly having to repair an older ride. Everyone started differently, so really it's a matter of using common sense and riding within ones abilities. Thanks again for all the input!
 

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Thanks again to all who replied. I fully intended on getting a little experience under my belt by taking the course. In fact it was never an option for me. I don't know if it works the same in other states, but here my local course qualifies you to get your license without taking the road test. It's a 3-day, 18 hour course and you get a waiver from the course instructor that you give to the DMV, they take your pic and your license comes in the mail. I also plan on watching the "Ride Like a Pro" DVD's a bunch of times. I am a physically fit guy so a big bike won't be a problem for me as far as weight goes. By the way, I don't feel that anyone who says to start small is wrong by any stretch. I think they are simply trying to encourage the sport and make it more enjoyable by manipulating the learning curve in the new riders favor. Because there is so much to learn and so many skills that must be mastered all at once, I think that is [/I]very[/I] good advice. On one hand, don't spend a lot in case you mess up and dump it or crash, which most likely will happen. I've heard that it's not a question of if you dump your bike, but when. That way you're not out a lot of money AND you've gained valuable experience. On the other hand, buy a really nice bike and it might encourage you to ride more and be more careful while you're at it without diminishing the experience and not getting discouraged by constantly having to repair an older ride. Everyone started differently, so really it's a matter of using common sense and riding within ones abilities. Thanks again for all the input!


Sounds like you've got a good head on your shoulders, and you'll do just fine.

When you get ride Like a Pro, get number 5. It encompasses all of 1-4 with the new stuff added. It's an excellent DVD, and I still thank RICZ here for turning me on to it. Best money I think I've spent on this hobby.
 

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buy a bike take the safety course and all get license..

BUT____If you have any fear when you ride as in lack of confidence stay on less traveled roads. try to ride as much as you can at low speeds to learn how the bike wants to be put thru the corners at various speeds and stops and starts..

being on a bike with fear of it can get you hurt fast..a healthy fear of being killed is always there but you must be confident in your ability to handle the bike to live.

good luck Best advise i can give is "once you are out there riding ride as if you are invisible and nobody can see you" That will keep you alive along time..
 
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