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If I was to buy a 2014 Cross Roads and leave everything stock to include the emmissions, can I expect a good reliable motorcycle to last the 100,000-200,000 miles that some claim? Or are they set up so bad with emmissions, that you have really no choice to modify? :confused:




What would the Victory stage 1 do for the bike? Thanks
 

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It runs just fine out of the box. You can expect many many miles of reliable operation. No one can guarantee you will never have a problem. But there are lots of Vic's out there that are stock with over 100,000 miles. It depends largely on how you maintain and ride it, just like any other motorcycle. You should have no worries about leaving it stock. In fact, some would argue that stock will be most reliable.
 

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mine is stock except for unplugged o2 sensors. 15000 miles
of fun so far. probably wont ever reach 100,000 miles .
i'll be two old. or i'll have to tryke it. not being modified
hasnt taken away the fun factor for us. to each his own.
even though 5000 mile oil changes are the norm i oil
and filter at 3000 miles. just me.
 

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I would AT LEAST put a PC5 on it and tune it on a dyno. Your fuel delivery will be spot on then and you will at least know you are not lean or rich. The real benefit will show as a cooler better running motor because of this. Honey is considering an XC and doesn't want the noise and feels there's plenty of performance out of the box. The PC5 and tune will be all that we do to hers. Again Its all about the fuel delivery with these stock bikes. They are too lean and run too hot. A fuel tune will make the best difference if you are leaving everything else stock.
 

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For a fuel controller that works just as well as the PCV I recommend the Dobeck AFR+ Gen4, you don't have to waste money on a dyno tune and it allows you to have some real time adjustability that the PCV does not give you.

For example you are going on a long ride someplace and you want the best fuel economy, just adjust the air/fuel ratio for the cruise mode to a leaner setting and you get better fuel economy while knowing you are not harming the engine because you have an air/fuel ratio gauge showing you the reading.

Want more performance after you arrive to your destination? Simple, again all you do is adjust the air/fuel ratio for the cruise mode to a richer setting and you get better performance while again knowing you are not harming the engine because you have an air/fuel ratio gauge showing you the reading.

No expensive dyno time, no expensive add on auto tune device like a PCV requires and the best part is the Dobeck AFR+ Gen4 is easy to use as it is not complicated at all.
 

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mine is stock except for unplugged o2 sensors. 15000 miles
of fun so far. probably wont ever reach ch 100,000 miles .
i'll be two old. or i'll have to tryke it. not being modified
hasnt taken away the fun factor for us. to each his own.
even though 5000 mile oil changes are the norm i oil
and filter at 3000 miles. just me.
What improvement did disconnecting the o2 sensors make? Will the stock ECM handle it?

And...any chance of seeing a pic of that custom windshield ?

Ron
 

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probably wont ever reach ch 100,000 miles .
i'll be two old. or i'll have to tryke it..
C'mon Irv, aren't I being a good enough role model to you kids? A group I ride with likes it when I lead cuz I don't slow down in the twisties and I'm pushing 80. A friend is 89 and he still does LD events. He's my role model. Take every opportunity to ride and those 100K will happen before ya know it. Pretty wife and I celebrate that event beside the road with a 100 Grand candy bar.cheers
 

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80 mph through the twisties.what a wild ass!
hope these pics come through.shield bigger than the picture.
to bad there is no dyno at a vic dealer anywhere close.
as far as the dobeck, id probably screw it up.
pics were taken inside. best i can do.
 

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OK, truth be told Irv...when the sign for the curve sez 10MPH, I slow down to 70.:)
 

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For a fuel controller that works just as well as the PCV I recommend the Dobeck AFR+ Gen4, you don't have to waste money on a dyno tune and it allows you to have some real time adjustability that the PCV does not give you.

For example you are going on a long ride someplace and you want the best fuel economy, just adjust the air/fuel ratio for the cruise mode to a leaner setting and you get better fuel economy while knowing you are not harming the engine because you have an air/fuel ratio gauge showing you the reading.

Want more performance after you arrive to your destination? Simple, again all you do is adjust the air/fuel ratio for the cruise mode to a richer setting and you get better performance while again knowing you are not harming the engine because you have an air/fuel ratio gauge showing you the reading.

No expensive dyno time, no expensive add on auto tune device like a PCV requires and the best part is the Dobeck AFR+ Gen4 is easy to use as it is not complicated at all.
I can't speak on the dobeck at all, never even heard of it until now but what you're saying about the pcv really isn't true.

1) dyno adjustment isn't "needed" but it is a good idea to make sure the fuel curves are exactly right
2) The pcv IS user adjustable
3) The autotune is not necessary unless you want a "custom" map without going to a dyno. Once you have a map the autotune serves no purpose unless you change something in the powertrain
4) user adjustment isn't needed once it's properly mapped because the maps take into account throttle position allowing you to have full power and best fuel economy all at the same time.

to explain 4 a bit more: When cruising or going long distance it's a safe bet that you'll be mostly using the lower half of your throttle range, 2-up and/or with luggage maybe a bit more. A good dyno guy can build you a map that keeps the a/f as lean as is safe at throttle positions up to say 50-60%. When max power is desired it's a good bet you're going to be full throttle or near to it. That same good dyno guy can build the rest of the map (70-100% throttle) at the correct ratio to make the most power. So you've got fuel economy all the time, and max power all the time eliminating the need for adjustment before and after a trip.

I'm not advocating one product over the other, just making sure correct information is conveyed.
 

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I can't speak on the dobeck at all, never even heard of it until now but what you're saying about the pcv really isn't true.

1) dyno adjustment isn't "needed" but it is a good idea to make sure the fuel curves are exactly right
2) The pcv IS user adjustable
3) The autotune is not necessary unless you want a "custom" map without going to a dyno. Once you have a map the autotune serves no purpose unless you change something in the powertrain
4) user adjustment isn't needed once it's properly mapped because the maps take into account throttle position allowing you to have full power and best fuel economy all at the same time.

to explain 4 a bit more: When cruising or going long distance it's a safe bet that you'll be mostly using the lower half of your throttle range, 2-up and/or with luggage maybe a bit more. A good dyno guy can build you a map that keeps the a/f as lean as is safe at throttle positions up to say 50-60%. When max power is desired it's a good bet you're going to be full throttle or near to it. That same good dyno guy can build the rest of the map (70-100% throttle) at the correct ratio to make the most power. So you've got fuel economy all the time, and max power all the time eliminating the need for adjustment before and after a trip.

I'm not advocating one product over the other, just making sure correct information is conveyed.
True dat.......
 

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I can't speak on the dobeck at all, never even heard of it until now but what you're saying about the pcv really isn't true.

1) dyno adjustment isn't "needed" but it is a good idea to make sure the fuel curves are exactly right
2) The pcv IS user adjustable
3) The autotune is not necessary unless you want a "custom" map without going to a dyno. Once you have a map the autotune serves no purpose unless you change something in the powertrain
4) user adjustment isn't needed once it's properly mapped because the maps take into account throttle position allowing you to have full power and best fuel economy all at the same time.

to explain 4 a bit more: When cruising or going long distance it's a safe bet that you'll be mostly using the lower half of your throttle range, 2-up and/or with luggage maybe a bit more. A good dyno guy can build you a map that keeps the a/f as lean as is safe at throttle positions up to say 50-60%. When max power is desired it's a good bet you're going to be full throttle or near to it. That same good dyno guy can build the rest of the map (70-100% throttle) at the correct ratio to make the most power. So you've got fuel economy all the time, and max power all the time eliminating the need for adjustment before and after a trip.

I'm not advocating one product over the other, just making sure correct information is conveyed.
Sure it is user adjustable if you want to lug around a lap top computer to hook up to it. Not quick nor is that easy.
As for the fuel maps you can't have it all in one tune I don't care what the PCV folks say. Either you want fuel economy or you want power but somewhere with a system like the PCV uses there will be trade offs.

You explain about different throttle percentages and this is where you are having to make your trade off with the PCV.

With the Dobeck and yes it to is not one shot for everything but with the Dobeck units you don't have to tune for different RPM's you set your desired air/fuel ratio and it is good for your entire RPM band. So it you want power you richen the air/fuel ratio and you have it for the entire RPM band.

In order to get an optimal tune with a PCV you will be spending money for dyno tunes. Those with the auto tune hooked up to their PCV still have to get out their lap top and accept the latest fuel trims from that ride if they want to keep them.

The Dobeck system is just so much more user friendly. After all what are you doing with a PCV on the dyno? You are setting up air/fuel ratios.

If you are building a race bike or a track bike then yes the PCV has more options available to the user, but for a street bike, in my opinion the Dobeck is hands down the best solution out there.
 

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Sure it is user adjustable if you want to lug around a lap top computer to hook up to it. Not quick nor is that easy.
As for the fuel maps you can't have it all in one tune I don't care what the PCV folks say. Either you want fuel economy or you want power but somewhere with a system like the PCV uses there will be trade offs.

You explain about different throttle percentages and this is where you are having to make your trade off with the PCV.

With the Dobeck and yes it to is not one shot for everything but with the Dobeck units you don't have to tune for different RPM's you set your desired air/fuel ratio and it is good for your entire RPM band. So it you want power you richen the air/fuel ratio and you have it for the entire RPM band.

In order to get an optimal tune with a PCV you will be spending money for dyno tunes. Those with the auto tune hooked up to their PCV still have to get out their lap top and accept the latest fuel trims from that ride if they want to keep them.

The Dobeck system is just so much more user friendly. After all what are you doing with a PCV on the dyno? You are setting up air/fuel ratios.

If you are building a race bike or a track bike then yes the PCV has more options available to the user, but for a street bike, in my opinion the Dobeck is hands down the best solution out there.
I'm not sure how you are reaching the conclusion that adjusting the fuel map based on throttle position is a trade off. Low throttle = cruising = fuel economy, high throttle = desire for acceleration = full power. There's no trade off at all, you get power when you need it and fuel economy when you don't need the power.

Yes, a PC requires money to be spent on a dyno, and is more expensive up front. And yes it requires a laptop to adjust. These are both valid points that I will grant you without argument.

However, there is no need to make adjustments once the map has been built unless you change something on the bike (intake, exhaust, cams, big bore, etc.) so there is no reason to carry a laptop or ever change the settings once they're in there. As for setting the map based on RPM, that's done on the dyno so again, there's no reason to change the settings once they're in.
 

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If I was to buy a 2014 Cross Roads and leave everything stock to include the emmissions, can I expect a good reliable motorcycle to last the 100,000-200,000 miles that some claim? Or are they set up so bad with emmissions, that you have really no choice to modify? :confused:
What would the Victory stage 1 do for the bike? Thanks
Really? You suspect that if you DON'T modify the bike it will not be reliable? :ltr:

Polaris intentionally designs these things to fail....it's good for...well, their reputation.

Buy the bike, ride, enjoy, repeat. Change the oil occasionally.
 

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Question!!!

Without a dyno tune, don't you need to know the exact target A/F ratio at EVERY throttle position for any fuel controller, auto tune or not ?
 

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Isn't every bike different and that's why YOUR map won't work with my bike?
 

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question, Victory 1 do you have the vfc4?

and yes you still need to know the right af mix numbers to run to get it running good, but the vfc4 does dound pretty easy to operate.

another question, vfc4 do you set one af setting and it keeps it there all the way through the rpms?




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That's why I question it, I think when the pro's dyno tune your ride the fuel curve changes with RPM, throttle position .......
 

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That's why I question it, I think when the pro's dyno tune your ride the fuel curve changes with RPM, throttle position .......
Not a "fuel curve," but rather fuel delivery settings. It is a 2-D map. On one axis is RPM and the other MAP. There are so many settings of each. It is not magic. Vic programs the base map for the equipment they sell, be it stock or Stage 1. They map it near stoich to get you the best gas mileage (for their components) and allow your catalytic converter to work best and last longest.

People who sell hop up parts just add offsets to the Vic maps. Their offsets are created via dyno measurements to provide best throttle response, and most power for the components on the bike.

There is no right or wrong. For people who would prefer to ride clean burning, quiet bikes that provide good mileage, the factory stuff is fine. For people who want to maximize power at the expense of pollution, noise, mileage etc, then nothing else will do.

It seems from my reading of these sites that either choice generally does fine. Most problems occur when someone tries to diddle with their machine between either properly tuned configuration. Surely there is a happy medium, but too many seem to get poor results.
 

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I dyno tuned last Oct. (KMC) With a PC5 and VM1 cams. I have not had to make any adjustments, get out a laptop, or worry about fuel economy. The bike runs strong and gets mid 40's for mileage. What else could you want from a 115 HP ride. VFC4 is a great improvement from their previous units but I don't want to screw with settings. I just wanna ride.
 
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