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Does anyone have any thoughts on these? I'm going to be riding around the country the first couple weeks of July, and will be in the SE and SW where it's going to be HOT and HOT and HUMID.

Thanks
 

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You'll need one for your Butt more then a jacket
 

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Does anyone have any thoughts on these? I'm going to be riding around the country the first couple weeks of July, and will be in the SE and SW where it's going to be HOT and HOT and HUMID.

Thanks
I've never used one. My body always seems to acclimate to the climate just fine, but I know folks who use them and like them.
 

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Working on the Flight Deck all day the CamelBak was a God send. However, riding is suppose to be a bit more fun. Stopping every few hours for gas, a drink, stretch the legs and pay the rent gives me a bit of a break and keeps me alert. I don't feel the need to hydrate while riding but I could see an advantage for those who want to put the most number of miles on in the shortest time possible. Of course what goes in...

Just saying


Personally I'd rather just stop to hydrate cheers
 

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I keep a bottle on the bars for water. And a cooler in one of the bags, I freeze several bottles and plenty of water for the day and keeps it cold as well. I've never used a cooling vest but I know wearing a camel back adds weight and body heat will warm the water.

I like breaks often for a bit of stretch and back on for more miles so switching out water or grabbing a snack is easy.
 

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Does anyone have any thoughts on these? I'm going to be riding around the country the first couple weeks of July, and will be in the SE and SW where it's going to be HOT and HOT and HUMID.

Thanks
Here is my experience with a cooling vest under mesh jacket.

I have ridden all day in 100 degree weather with a cooling vest. On our way back from Dubois, WY last year we made our last stop the first day in Chadron, Ne. The other riders in the group were exhausted from the heat. I could have ridden another 200 miles with no problem.

On another trip back from Colorado we were in 100 degree heat again. When we stopped for a break I noticed a rider was in trouble. He had borrowed a cooling vest but wasn't wearing it. We got it under water and had him put it on as we'll as his mesh jacket. He was amazed at how much it helped and was able to ride to our stop. Keeping the sun off skin also helps.
 

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Here is my experience with a cooling vest under mesh jacket.

I have ridden all day in 100 degree weather with a cooling vest. On our way back from Dubois, WY last year we made our last stop the first day in Chadron, Ne. The other riders in the group were exhausted from the heat. I could have ridden another 200 miles with no problem.

On another trip back from Colorado we were in 100 degree heat again. When we stopped for a break I noticed a rider was in trouble. He had borrowed a cooling vest but wasn't wearing it. We got it under water and had him put it on as we'll as his mesh jacket. He was amazed at how much it helped and was able to ride to our stop. Keeping the sun off skin also helps.
I have never tried a cooling vest. Most of the time I just avoid the high heat areas.

But; I do use a camelbac. Staying hydrated a rider can go farther with more leftover energy, just like with the cooling vest story. If you wait till you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated.
When I was a ski patroller, I carried water in my pack. It was hard to get out and I drank less water. Once I switch to a water bladder (with a hose) inside my pack I found the extra fuel from being hydrated.
If I'm riding solo, I will put the Camelbac on the back seat with some of the load. If I'm riding 2 up, I have a large fanny pack that I put a water bladder in and spin it around in front of me.
Here is an important tip for filling your water container back up.
Most convenient stores have a soda machine with ice and water. Ask to fill up you bottle. If they let you and most will; fill it up with mostly ice. The ice from a ice machine is purified water if the ice is cubes. (drinking water from different areas can sometimes make a person sick)
 

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My solution for staying hydrated is inserting the bladder from a camelbac into my tank bag. I fill it with ice, then with water in the space that's left and wrap it in a towel that goes around it a few times for insulation. I attach the clamp onto a left edge of the tank bag and that way, I can sip while under way with both hands on the bars. Works great for long hauls in hot weather as I don't have to stop to hydrate.
I haven't tried a cooling vest yet, but it sounds like a good way to go. I have been using cool ties for many years with good results.
If ever you come across a rider having physical problems in the heat, have him drink a lot of water on the spot and tell him to keep drinking during his ride. Riding dehydrates a body rapidly. The more skin you have exposed, the faster you dehydrate.
 

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While not required, but certainly advantageous, cooling vests can and do keep one's energy level up. This said... the only time that I have had the need for one was when I was crossing Death Valley when it was 136 degrees in the shade. Remember that your body's regular temperature is 98.6 degrees... and sweat is the way that we regulate that.

So we sweat... so we need to hydrate... as already mentioned, I carry frozen bottles of water and carry one in my cup holder and drink from it as it melts.

Have a great ride...
 

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Last year we tried cooling vests for the first time. I can say they do work. I recommend wearing a wicking t-shirt underneath one rather than cotton. This way you won't have a wet clammy shirt clinging to you. We stop about every 90 minutes or so at a gas station to get a cool drink and to "refresh" the vests. Proper hydration is just as important as keeping the sun off your skin and at the above mentioned intervals, we can keep our "reservoirs" at good levels. I read a technical article on hot weather riding last year and while I can't recall all of the details, one of the salient points is that at around 93 degrees, you need to start keeping air off of your skin and not just the sun. At these temps and above, the author wrote about how the wind directly on your skin is no longer your friend. Again, the scientific details elude me but the guidance is all one needs to remember. He recommended long sleeved wicking t-shirts at this point. Since I have a fairing, I'm not getting blasted with air so the combination of the cooling vest, short sleeved wicking t-shirt and mesh jacket worked well for me and I am not one that handles the heat all that well. I have seen vests that have a higher neck line and even some that are actually jackets as they have sleeves. I would consider one of those if I were going to spend significant time riding in the triple digits. That cool damp collar on the neck would be sweet. Of course you can always pair one of those cooling neck wraps with a conventional v-neck vest if you so desire.

That was a bit winded but in summary, the vests work well and are well worth the $40. But you also have to have a comprehensive plan for higher temps as no one thing will address all aspects.
 

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A cooling vest, a moisture wicking under shirt, and a mesh jacket is the best way to ride on 95°F+ day. The cooling vest makes a big difference and the mesh jacket is needed to keep the sun off of your skin. The last two summers here it was above 100°F from early June to September so I got a lot of experience with this setup.

Basically, at temperatures above 95°F the effects of convection from the wind blowing over your skin is now heating your body rather than cooling it. It's the same process when riding in 80°F temperatures the wind moving over your skin has a cooling effect. But when the air is warmer than your skin it is now transferring heat to your skin instead of pulling it away from you. If you ride with just a t-shirt and a lot of exposed skin on very hot days it is impossible to drink enough water to replace all that you are losing. That's the reason why covering you skin will actually keep you cooler even though it sounds counter productive.

Very good article about it here:
http://www.ironbutt.com/ibmagazine/ironbutt_1002_62-66_Hot.pdf
 

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I have used the inexpensive cooling vest that you rinse in cold water and put on...IT works great but only for about an hour... I would buy again.
 

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Does anyone have any thoughts on these? I'm going to be riding around the country the first couple weeks of July, and will be in the SE and SW where it's going to be HOT and HOT and HUMID.

Thanks
Camelbak - freaking awesome. What I do is freeze mine the night before...water stays nice and cold all day long!

As for the cooling vests....Im not sold on them. Of course, the ones I tried were from about 5 years ago - maybe the technology has improved. 5 years ago, they didnt stay wet/cool for very long in high temps, drying out within an hour - and then you are basically wearing another layer. Ive found it easier to just not wear it and let the sweat on my tshirt act as a cooler.
 

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This is the article I was speaking of. Quite a lot of useful information. Thanks for posting.[/QUOTE]

I was about to post this link up.
Cooling vests, well, I never had much luck.
Camelback, one of the best things ever for staying hydrated IMHO
A word of caution. DO NOT just throw on a jacket and take off half baked after reading the IBA article. You will end up half baked.
IF you take the time to learn how to make these things work for you they are fantastic. Long rides throught the desert are near AC comfortable if done correctly. Stay hydrated and pony up the money for the wicking undergarments, they can save your life. I like Wickers. http://underwear.wickers.com/mens-moisture-wicking-t-shirts-ZXsZX135
Opt for the long sleeve and the underpants in long. These work well. I like them better than LD Comfort products but that may be they are less than half the price. I have used both and own both, still grab the Wickers first. JMHO
Mesh is OK for short rides or under 95ish degrees, but it can actually be determental. Cooling vests seem good for some, but if they ever get hot, you are done. Learn to use things you may alrady have (or should) and how to take full advantage of them.

Have a great trip!
 
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