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Discussion Starter #1
I know we have the terrible story with cornfed, don't like to think about that one.

Maybe as a learning experience, maybe as a "I'm lucky I haven't crashed.. yet", maybe for the voyeurism of watching, or hearing about, wrecks...

Have you crashed on a motorcycle?
What kind of motorcycle?
What happened?
Your fault?
Did you get hurt?
Any suggestions?


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#1 BMW, many moons ago... (1973?) Going fast-ish, over 100, tailwind, straight road, high-speed wobble, 2 seconds and down. (A test rider had a story in a motorcycle mag about that year/model having a too short frame, causing instability at high speed, with a tail wind!, he crashed too) Don't know how I could have avoided that... although, the bike had a steering damper I think, and maybe it could have been tighter. Got some abrasions.

#2 BMW, different bike, a bit too fast, curvy mountain road, started scraping stuff, cut the throttle, (opposed twin) torque effect sat the bike up a little too much, off the road, into a rock, flew off, bike hit tree, I landed in soft bed of oak leaves... tow truck driver said that curve was notorious, someone just killed in sports car in same turn, road was cambered wrong (opposite), making BMW's especially likely to easily scrape stuff/cylinders.. don't think I'd have crashed if not for the camber problem of the road, but it was probably my sudden cutting of the throttle that did me in, changed my line, sent me off the road... if not for that I'd probably have just done a low-side slide into the rock or tree and died. Not hurt.

Knock on wood, that's my crash history.
 

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1979 Honda CB750. Spring of 92, I had two years of experience on motorcycles. Same bike for those two years. I was living in Princeton NJ but spent most of my seat time going back and forth between Princeton and Bayonne to be with friends via rout 1. I can't remember the Princeton exit but Bayonne is 14A.
I had just discovered the joys of bombing backroads and was frankly very reckless. Way to fast around a near hairpin turn and spotted a police car pulling out around three hundred feet ahead. I panicked and nearly went off-road. Came out of the turn in a deathwobble and just couldn't recover. Bike went over I clung to the bike and we went sliding own the road. Ended up sliding under the front bumper of the police car. I had some good rash but otherwise intact. Scared the **** out of me and I didn't ride again for a long time. The police officer was very cool about it. I will never forget the look in his face. I think he was more afraid than I was. Told me he thought I was dead. No report was ever filed.


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Here's a wake up call.....just because the stoplight is green doesn't mean it's safe and you don't need to pay attention to cross traffic, in the last two months I've seen two cars pass through a solid red light and never even touch their brakes and the lights weren't changing at the time they were solid red. I would imagine they were using their cell phones as both of them never even saw me stop and watch them keep right on going. Both were at night too....a friend of mine's girlfriend was just hit head on in a curve by a 21yr male and was hurt really bad I'm still waiting to hear if he was using his cell phone during the wreck...If you want to stay alive and well pay attention to everything around you and where you're heading, behind you too.
Never ride in the blind spot of another vehicle either(beside them).
Never follow too close, I had a very close call on this one on wet pavement.

Cell phones users scare the crap out of me...wake-up riders!

Wrecking your bike is usually your fault for over riding the road conditions.

I've never been down,been very close a few times though,almost all of those times were mostly my fault, 136,000 miles since 1999, four different bikes. I don't believe in gremlin bells, I believe in paying attention to my surroundings so far it's been working for me.

Ride like you have a target on you and everybody's trying to hit it(you).........be safe everybody!
 

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Let's go back in time. Instead of being 66, I am an 20ish kid on a 175 cc Kawasaki enduro style bike. I am on my way to work in a 35 MPH zone on a 4 lane surface street. Traffic is moderately heavy but not so much that I can't maintain the speed limit. I am in the fast lane with a cage to my right and fairly heavy oncoming traffic to my left. I notice a kid, high school student type, stopped at a stop sign to my right but he has stopped.
So here we go maybe 100 feet later. The kid at the stop sign has started to pull out and I am concerned about my predicament. If he keeps going he will cross my path of travel and I will have a hard time getting around behind him but I might make it if he keeps moving. Now I start braking hard not knowing what will happen next. I notice that the cage next to me is also hard on the brakes so we are staying side by side.
Here I am now, less than 50 feet from that side street. The car has decided that the oncoming traffic is just too heavy for him to proceed safely so he has stopped in my lane.The car next to me looks like it might make it OK around him and I am still braking hard with nowhere to go.
Next thing I know I am awake with a cop standing over me telling me to stay put and not try to get up.
A few days later I find out that my bike has been totaled as has the car I hit. It was a 4 door sedan and I hit it in the post between the front and back door. The post collapsed and both doors were total losses. The pressure surge in the car took out the windshield and the rear window and caused damage to the opposite side windows too. My bike's front wheel ended up wrapped around the single cylinder engine. Of course things like the front forks, front brakes and front wheel were a total loss.
Fast forward 6 months and I am released by the orthopedic surgeon to return to work.
I did learn from that one. I no longer allow myself to be trapped where I have no place to dodge left or right. Braking is not always enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here's a wake up call.....just because the stoplight is green doesn't mean it's safe and you don't need to pay attention to cross traffic, in the last two months I've seen two cars pass through a solid red light and never even touch their brakes and the lights weren't changing at the time they were solid red. I would imagine they were using their cell phones as both of them never even saw me stop and watch them keep right on going. Both were at night too....a friend of mine's girlfriend was just hit head on in a curve by a 21yr male and was hurt really bad I'm still wiating to hear if he was using his cell phone during the wreck...If you want to stay alive and well pay attention to everything around you and where you're heading, behind you too.
Never ride in the blind spot of another vehicle either(beside them).
Never follow too close, I had a very close call on this one on wet pavement.

Cell phones users scare the crap out of me...wakeup riders!

Wrecking your bike is usually your fault for over riding the road conditions.

I've never been down,been very close a few times though,almost all of those times were mostly my fault, 136,000 miles since 1999, four different bikes. I don't believe in gremlin bells, I believe in paying attention to my surroundings so far it's been working for me.

Ride like you have a target on you and everybodies trying to hit it(you).........be safe everybody!
Ah, would you mind crashing first before posting on this thread.. geez.
 

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October---1977. I rented this country farm house with a drop off from the front yard about 2 feet onto the pavement. I am 21 years old and I am going to my mother in law's to pick up my 4 year old daughter. Yes, I would strap on a helmet 87 times too big and set her in front of me between the seat and tank on my Honda CB 350 with 4 straight pipes and ride her around--- but I was always carful and slower with her on there. Keep in mind the county today only has 15,000 people and 5 stoplights, so you can imagine how rural it was almost 40 years ago. Anyway----as I did my Evel Knevil:cool: jump from the yard to the road and went up thru the gears I thought I heard something fall off the back. I thought it was her helmet, so I looked back. I looked on the wrong side, so I looked on the other side and no--that was not it, because the helmet was still there. While wondering what it was I heard I looked around to find myself 60 mph in the middle of a 20 mph curve to the left with a 8 ft ditch. I locked it down and did the slide for life and let the bike go flying away.

It took years for hair to grow back on my left arm and my left leg has some funny designs in the skin and the limp went away after a few months. Going to the hospital was not even a thought---didn't even miss a day of work at the tire recapping factory--but I was moving slow.

I got a lot of education in that 30 seconds in October of 1977 that has probably saved me a lot of pain thru the years.

My only other motorcycle wreck was forgetting to put the kickstand down on the Cross Roads while gassing up in a hurry back in September, so I guess you could say both of my wrecks have been because of stupidity!!!! :eek:
 

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Over 60 years without a crash of any kind and then the cell phone came along. Poor little 18 year old rich girl on one did this....
 

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#1 BMW, many moons ago... (1973?) Going fast-ish, over 100, tailwind, straight road, high-speed wobble, 2 seconds and down. (A test rider had a story in a motorcycle mag about that year/model having a too short frame, causing instability at high speed, with a tail wind!, he crashed too) Don't know how I could have avoided that... although, the bike had a steering damper I think, and maybe it could have been tighter. Got some abrasions.
Steering dampers are great for damping steering head oscillations. If the engine, frame, and the swingarm are duking it out, not so much.

#2 BMW, different bike, a bit too fast, curvy mountain road, started scraping stuff, cut the throttle, (opposed twin) torque effect sat the bike up a little too much, off the road, into a rock, flew off, bike hit tree,
Didn't sit the bike up, it compressed the suspension due to engine braking and being leaned over, this decreased your ground clearance causing you to scrape too much "stuff."

In any case, had you been wearing pink hair spray on your legs in both cases, you could have avoided undue road rash.
 

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Have you crashed on a motorcycle?
Yes.

Dirtbikes as a kid with some regularity. Didn't know what I was doing then and can't remember what I did wrong now.

As a street rider, I went 20 something years without incident. Then one day riding home from work in the cold I got off the highway and decided to unplug my heated jacket as I was warming fast in the stop and go of local traffic. I dropped the long cord as the light turned green. I looked down to grab it while starting to move forward seeing the light had changed. Unfortunately, the guy in front of my was whacking his pud instead of moving along to the green light.

I racked the **** outta my nuts on the large, square Ducati tank as I grabbed the front brake doing a pro stoppie demo for the rush hour crowd, just before I plunked into the fender of pud whacker.

No biggie, no damage to anything aside from my nuts, my bike, and my ego.

Took bike to shop for repair and shop had a fire. Bike wasn't damaged, but all bikes were covered by their insurance due to smoke damage. Took the money and my wrench and removed all my aftermarket **** and sold it on the Duc forum. Saddlebag hit the cherries that day.

Fast forward several years. It was spring and again on my way home from work, I took the scenic country route. Coming up to a little one light town I was behind a school bus full of Mexican field worker's children. The schoolbus was turning left at the light and for some reason about half way thru the turn she slammed on the brakes. Me behind her had plently of room to stop, but skerred the jackass behind me might not. I steer for the shoulder and apply the brake.

A few problems:

1. Being spring, all the sand and salt from winter had congregated over on the shoulder and was not particularly visible.

2. Being a sportbike guy, I grabbed the front brake on my new first croozer.

3. Said croozer had outstanding brakes with no anti-look functionality.

As you may have guessed. the front wheel locked on the silt and slid. Being I was leaned over as I swerved onto the shoulder to get out of the line of impact, the bike became unstable and fell over even with my best attempts to try to right it.

The bike slid under the bus where it got loged. I banged my helmet off the curb but remained unfazed. The lid was about 5 years old at the time.

Lesson learned, buy a bike with anti-lock brakes. What did I do. bought a Victory with crappy brakes and no anti-lock functionality. What the hell, since they don't bite the asphault, I should be too worried about them locking up, right? :confused:
 

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Diamondbird-good post. Excellent lessons for us all to remember.
Saddlebag-still LMAO!

Went down 3 1/2 yrs ago, northeast of Tonasket, WA, checking out some deer country on an 04 GW. On a 2lane, small backcountry road at about 35-40mph. Leading my buddy and approaching an intersection with a road coming in from the right. Our path sweeps to the left at the junction of the intersection. I am just entering the junction and starting my lean when I notice that the entire intersection has large rocks and some patches of pea gravel. My brain says no way I am making this turn (which I was familiar with) and I hit the binders hard. This started me sliding on the rocks and I let off on the brakes, briefly, finding my trajectory now taking me straight ahead off a 15ft embankment. I locked the brakes up and prepared to stage left as there was no way I wanted to be with that bike over the bank! Laid the bike down on the left crash bar the last 5-6 ft of pavement and was rolling off when the bike stopped, 1/2 off the pavement, about 2ft from the embankment. Ended up getting a stinger and blacking out for a few seconds as My shoulder hit the gravel. Thankfully, all turned out OK. Me with sore neck and bike with crash bar scratches. Lesson learned? S$&t happens! From what we could find out, they had chip gravelled that road a few weeks before and not cleared the gravel off that intersection for some reason. Saw a car almost lose it while I was recovering! I had no warning and still do not have an answer to how I could have seen it sooner and avoided a crash.
Jim
 

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May 23 2013. 2008 Suzuki M109R. A buddy & I were parked at a restaurant In Our town meeting my family & some other friends. We were parked & getting off our bikes when we were creamed by a lady that did not want to wait for the person stopped in the road for the people to back out of the parking spot. The best we could figure is the lady was working pedals & husband was steering. At least that is what they said after they said we pulled in front of them & the witnesses stated we were parked & getting off the bikes.
My friend wound up with torn MCL, I had 6 broken ribs, two partially collapsed ribs. To top it off, she did not have any insurance & left town before she was to appear in court. After she ran us over, she hit all these cars.
 

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One more. In 1982, was coming out of London, UK, on Western Ave. It was elevated, 3 lane with the left lane about to exit to the left. I was in the center lane with heavy traffic doing around 50-60. First thing I noticed was cars in the left lane braking and swerving as a 16ft extension ladder came off a truck and slid out into my lane. I was on my Honda 250 RS single with throw over bags on my way home. Braked hard as I could as the ladder rotated CCW, stood and yanked on the bars to lighten the front end. Hit the ladder at about a 10 and 4 o'clock position and rode over it. Stopped about a mile ahead to calm the thankful prayers going off in my head!
Those are my two stories. Do not need any more to tell about. Be safe as possible out there. S$&t happens!
Jim
 

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I've been pretty lucky considering everything and some of the chances I took at times. If you ever want to test your metal; split lanes through any major city in CA during rush hour on an HD dresser (bike with a fairing and hard saddlebags). I guess it would be called a bagger now like an XC or Electraglide.

Only went down once though and that was on a 1979 Yamaha 650 I bought when stationed at Pearl Harbor. Single vehicle accident when I came off the freeway onto the off ramp like I had done a hundred times before and hundreds more since then in San Diego off Highway 94. The bike just went out from under me in the curve. I rolled and slid just getting some abrasions on my hand and bike just kinda endo'd and bounced over into the oncoming traffic lane. I was lucky because no one was behind me and no one was in the oncoming lane. I could not find a cause though. No gravel no oil on the road or tires. Still a mystery. I just picked up the bike, it started right up, and continued on to meet my friends to go on a weekend run out town. Just had to clean up the hand and wear gauze and a fingerless glove for the weekend. I had left my gloves on the table to make a quick run back to my place for something I had forgotten. If I had been wearing them like I should have; I would not have even had any abrasions.

Like I said; I've been pretty lucky considering. I was probably just going a snarch too fast for the curve that time. :ride: I had rear shocks on the bike at the time of the accident. I put these struts on later like an idiot. they didn't stay on too long though.

 

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Too many to recall on dirt bikes, everyone of them were my fault! Young and stupid back then.

Several close call on street bikes but have not crashed on the road; however I have laid down my bike twice in the yard, the first was my OL roadstar, trying to turn it around, yard was muddy and the throttle was a little quick. Second time I had worked a double, parked my road glide in the yard (going to wash it). Several hours later I decided to just put it in the shed and wash later, took a more direct route to the ramp leading into the shed and could not make the turn, rode right off the ramp about a third of the way up (the ramp is 16 foot and 20 inch rise). Laid trapped under that hog for ten minutes.


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Sydney 1983. Honda CB400. I am riding past inner city Redfern railway station on my way to University.
A completely drunk native Australian guy staggers out of the station across the road towards the pub, it is a suicide dash, he runs right in front of me, I am doing 60 kmh, hit the brakes.
KKRUNCH!!
Just as he stops in the middle of the traffic and turns to look at me, I hit him full on in the guts, up he goes over my shoulder and somersaults over the bike, while I lay it down.
I get up, thankful for boots gloves leather jacket and full face helmet, then check the guy I have hit, he is groaning and gurgling in the gutter, poor bastard. He has one arm in plaster already, I put my gloves under his head. I talk to him, but he is out of it. I turn to pick up my bike but some of his drinking mates have wandered out of the pub and are asking what a white boy like me is doing on the street there anyway...
I back up, leave my helmet on.
Sirens in the distance.
They hear and start to back away.
Ambulance arrives, medics look resigned as they load the pedestrian into wagon and with sirens still blazing, take him away.
Cops arrive, take notes, no charges, I am free to go.

Pedestrians can be as dangerous as cagers, especially when they are drink or drug effected.
 

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Ahh, war stories. History is written by those that survive.

A pie chart of survivability would be almost entirely the luck of the draw and then maybe a barely perceptible sliver of planning, prevention, skill and experience.

To qualify, I honestly can't remember the amount of times I have been separated from control of my motorcycle. Time and volume have dimmed the count. The worst included a month in the hospital. OTOH there have been many that I got up, dusted my sorry butt off and returned to whatever I was doing. In between the extremes and most common my bounces included friends with a truck and a trip to the ER for sutures or plaster of paris and a scolding from the medicos. The good news is it's been decades so I forget. The bad news it's been decades SO I forget.

From none of my wrecks did I learn much of value. They say that humans have a survival mechanism that prevents you from remembering pain. I think if that were not true, I would have learned more than I have. That truth would be proven because if I could recall the pain I would not be here on a motorcycle forum, and I wouldn't be planning for summertime of motorcycle life or filling my closets and garages with motorcycle detritus. I can see the scars and feel the current pains of beating up my bod but the pain of the injury is gone and with it the good sense to get out while I still had the memory.

I have learned much from the wrecks of others though. From my bro Ken I learned that sitting at a light and being tapped at less than 5 mph from behind is enough to kill you. RIP Ken. From a hard decision I made some years ago to volunteer at a living facility for head injury victims I learned that the difference between the cognizant life we come to the party with and the fog of a world scrambled forever is just a set of seemingly innocuous factors playing out because of or despite your best efforts.

The road is a casino. You can study and practice the game and hedge your bets with all the gear and skill you can muster. It's wise to do so. Do all of that, and you can tip the scales to improve your chances of winning the next hand. But the odds are always with the house. The house antes up asphalt, concrete, steel. Your ante is flesh and bone. The cards are velocity, time and the decision making of you and humans you don't know.

This ain't rocket scientry. Bets in? Let's play.
 

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Previous crashes

When I lived in Holland I did not own a car, I did everything on my motorbike, summer and winter.... late "80 and '90's

Quite a few crashes in the past all on "low speed"

1- About 20 years ago in the winter 05:00 in the morning about 15 Cm of fresh snow, arrived 500 meters from my work safely, and a Car came arround the corner with his handbrake "FUN" and I was able to miss the sliding car but I dropped the bike on top of my leg, no injury but difficult to get up?? YAMAHA XJ600

2- In the City I overtook a friend too-fast and approaching a bridge drove right trough a fence into a garden..... embarrassing YAMAHA XJ600

3- On the "dikes" in Holland some gravel in a corner skidded and lucky some wooden fence held myself and the bike on top of the bike, it is 3 or 4 meters high KAWASAKI 1100 cc

4- Was driving 260 Km an hour on the highway at night and when I slowed down to take the exit the bike started "wobbling" I thought it was ICE but at lower speed I looked at my back tire and it was flat, very lucky I was speeding, result NOTHING happened, just parked the bike on the roadside KAWASAKI 1100 cc

5- Drove all around Europe and the piston rod came trough the crankcase on the highway.... KAWASAKI 1100 cc

XXX now i have a Jackpot and not crashed yet, lets keep it that way shall we?? never had a glorious bike like this, 2013 Orange

Enjoy the ride,
Andre:ltr:
 

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Been down once on a Honda CX500. Speed was not a factor. I had slowed down for a train on my left and a cement truck on my right. What I saw on the roadway was a swath of water dripped off a cement truck. As I leaned into a slow left turn, the wheels went out from under me and I spun a 180. The swath of water was actually a swath of oil. Shaken but not hurt, I picked the bike up and rode the last 2 blocks to work. Traced the oil trail to a truck's nearby parking spot the next day. A container had tipped and spilled oil out the tailgate. Filed complaint with police, but didn't expect much follow up despite the amount of oil this guy had left on the roadway.
 

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Dirt playing... Lots of get-offs, one injury. Messed up my right ankle pretty good.

Racing... Many get-offs, one injury. Broke 7 ribs.

Street riding... Three. Two just road rash, one damned near severed my left leg. 30 days in the trauma center, 10 surgeries to re-attach the leg. Lost 60 lbs (206 to 146). Six months recovery before I could walk with a cane and work. Still have my leg, but it looks a mess and I won't be running any foot races.
 

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April 10th , 1985 - 2pm.

I was 22.
Got new bike on birthday - 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 900.
Bike very fast.
Rider very inexperienced.
Went end over end ...slipped on road salt on out edge of road, flew down 20 foot embankment. Handlebars broke off in my hand. When I finally landed.....my right leg impaled on handlebar end.
Once all the bike pieces landed....I instinctively collected all the parts scattered about...so no one would hurt my bike.
After that I quietly blacked out on the side of the road....handlebar still in my right leg.
Next memory was laying in the hospital ...with the handlebar on the floor next to me.
Owned the bike for a total of 10 days.

I'm now 50.
My '13 Hammer is the next bike I owned since April 10th 1985.

Peter
 
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