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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I removed the belt gaurd on my 2015 highball and was thinking a red belt would look monster cool. Has anyone ever seen colored belts or know is there is a good way and paint product that would work?
 

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Any kind of paint would dry out / crack the rubber

Yes a different colour belt would be fun to see
 

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normal solvent based paints wouldnt be good with rubber as BP6000VR
pointed out but surely there's ways of colouring rubber without damage.
Get onto a specialist in rubber
 

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Ask a body shop what type of paint to use as they have been painting rubber bumpers for years now......Saying that, a belt goes thru a lot of flexing.
 

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Ask a body shop what type of paint to use as they have been painting rubber bumpers for years now......Saying that, a belt goes thru a lot of flexing.
I operate a small body shop.
what you call rubber bumpers are actually plastic bumpers, I add flex additive up to 15% when painting such items as well as an adhesion promoter
A plastic bumper does sometimes have a black rubbery area but that's just sprayed with the same paint as the plastic parts.

the belt drive is a different animal with what it goes through.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Cant believe this is not a common item. I would have thought it would be readily available. Maybe I am alone in thinking it would look sweet to accent the belt? Thanks for the input lads.
 

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Well after a bit of my own research into this I conclude that maybe these belts wouldn't have the longevity needed for safety reasons? Carbon black was added to increase thread life. I'm thinking adding enough colour to mask over the carbon black would result in the belt being unusable?

The use of whitewall rubber for wheels has been traced to a small tire company in Chicago called Vogue Tyre and Rubber Co that made them for their horse and chauffeur drawn carriages in 1914.[1]

Early automobile tires were made of pure natural rubber with various chemicals mixed into the tread compounds to make them wear better.[2] The best of these was zinc oxide, a pure white substance that increased traction and also made the entire tire white.[2] However, the white rubber did not offer sufficient endurance, so carbon black was added to the rubber to greatly increase tread life.[3] Using carbon black only in the tread produced tires with inner and outer sidewalls of white rubber. Later, entirely black tires became available, the still extant white sidewalls being covered with a somewhat thin, black colored layer of rubber. Should a black sidewall tire have been severely scuffed against a curb, the underlying white rubber would be revealed; it is in a similar manner that raised white letter (RWL) tires are made.
 
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