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Discussion Starter #1
Don't know if it just slipped their mind or what. When I had my bike at the dealer for clutch noise, i had asked if they changed the oil since they had the cover off. He said the catch it in a clean pan and pour it back. So, i check the oil a few weeks late, turns out they forgot to replace the quart that drained.

Or, how much oil would you drop from a 100 engine from taking primary cover off? I was at full line before shop visit.

If it turns out they dropped the ball, i have change dealers.

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Now you know why I never trust others with tools and my stuff. I stand by and observe or I don't use that shop.
 

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Now you know why I never trust others with tools and my stuff. I stand by and observe or I don't use that shop.
I'm just like you which is why I'm never going back to the shop under the Ross Island....


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Well not in my city, there are 2 or 3 in NJ. I go to 1 where I bought it 20 miles north. We have a new dealer 2 miles away they just got the victory line, but they sell everything there. Then there's another one central jersey maybe 2 not sure.

But I prefer to wrench my own stuff, unless I can watch. What I dislike is the service guy talking to tech and telling me he needs 5 mins to talk. Seems very secretive to me. My brother owns a shop and has no problem taking to mechanic with customer present.

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What happened? I have never had the pleasure.
I went in for a new rear tire which took about an hour and a half. Walked into the service area to check out my bike up on the stand and see what was involved with a rear tire replacement and was asked to leave and go out front by the Service Manager--never had that happen at the other dealership where you are free to watch them work on your ride...

Also, I just wasn't impressed with how little the guy (manager, not the mechanic) knew about the Victory line. The whole place just wasn't very fun to visit--no interaction from others whatsoever... The other dealership is a fun place to visit, they are engaging, interesting and don't make you feel like you are inconveniencing them by being there...

I realize that some of us put more stock into the relationships we have between us and places we do business, and maybe I'm kind of butt sore because I do find that important, but my first experience at getting service there will probably be my last...
 

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BT, sorry to hear that about them. Having never required service, I can't add to that, but the guys in the front have been very friendly to me. For tire and generic service, I'll be going to Cycle Specialties on 105th as they have a ton of experience with Goldwings and heavy cruisers and you can watch the sausage being made.
 

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I will not use my local victory dealer here, I had a bad experience with them when I had my m109r. There is a local guy I found that has a great following that I found he has reasonable rates and does not do unnecessary work.
 

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So I had this van nosed box truck back in the day. Had a 350 with a double pumper. Took it to the dealer with a linkage problem under warranty. This was not a Victory dealership but it had a V in the name too, just with a Che ahead of it.
Pick it up Friday he says.

I was working nights and showed up an hour or two early to see if it was ready and some monkey comes rolling out from underneath it with the driveshaft in his hands. Pop is thinking it odd that a carb linkage adjustment requires driveline disassembly. I poked my head under the van and these bozos are about ten minutes away from pulling my motor.

Turns out they dropped a screw down one of the barrels when they were futzing around with the linkage and didn't bother fishing it out. When they lit up the mill it chewed up the head and the jug pretty good before it got flattened into the crown of the jug.

So Mr. Goodwrench is planning to swap mills on me and would have if I had not showed up early. They had a totaled donor Biscayne in the boneyard they were busy raping while the rocket scientists inside were prepping my Hi-Cube for the pull. Looking to give me that new van old station wagon engine custom job. If they weren't such obvious idiots it might have been funny and I might not have taken the dealership to court.

That was a factory service team for the biggest of the big three. Trust who you want with your stuff but it is no surprise to Pop why peeps are sometimes snookered when they drop off their prized rides to be serviced by some of these folks.

Remember, service isn't just about repair.
It's also what the stallion does to the mare.
 

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As I said; there's a lot of guys who are dangerous with tools in their hands.
I was able to stand by while my XR was being prepped for me fresh out of the crate. One of the accessories I requested was a centerstand, which had to be a dealer install. I watched as the "tech" removed the seat and both mufflers in order to hook it up to the rear of the crankcase. Said centerstand was an unqualified POS and PITA (as oft discussed in these forums) and had to come off pronto. So I lay down on the floor to see what I needed to do to extricate it and I observe that only two bolts are holding it in place. I figure I'll free those, then determine if I have to remove the mufflers to peel away the stand. Once those two bolts were gone, the stand dropped freely away with me gnashing my teeth over thoughts of that "tech" needlessly tearing parts off my new bike. If the installation procedure he used was in the shop manual, then the factory is guilty of padding what a customer would pay if that stand was purchased after the sale. Just like the lengthy and involved method they have for tightening the steering head bearings on the XR, which I shortcutted to less than 10 minutes.
 

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I went in for a new rear tire which took about an hour and a half. Walked into the service area to check out my bike up on the stand and see what was involved with a rear tire replacement and was asked to leave and go out front by the Service Manager--never had that happen at the other dealership where you are free to watch them work on your ride...
I can attest that if you're asked to leave a service area, it's because there is a safety and/or LIABILITY concern for your person. If you step into my shop, I'll sure as hell ask you to step back out. I'm pleasant about it, maybe laugh and joke about how you shouldn't climb into the greasemonkey cage. But I will ask you to step out. And I won't back down on it, either. I'm not about to put my employer in a position where they'd have to pay your medical bills because you got a metal sliver in your eye or you tripped on an air hose and cracked your head open. That's the short and skinny of it.

But, by all means hang out and watch if that's what want to do. You just can't be on my shop floor to do it. Other shops I've worked for have had a waiting room with a window from which you can fishbowl the wrenches, if you're so inclined. My current shop doesn't, which some folks find distressing. I didn't design the building, so that's not on me, and nothing I can do about it. They find it extra distressing during the winter when the weather is damn terrible and it's too cold/wet/snowing to stand near one of the shop doors.

But I got a couple other things to say on the issue still: Firstly, wrenches HATE being watched. But you can make it bearable by making some pleasant conversation. Don't stare at the backs of our heads waiting for a mistake. Making a guy feel like he's ON THE SPOT, being watched, isn't going to improve your service quality. If you're worried the joint is going to try to pull some fast one on you, or break something and not own it, then you shouldn't be there in the first place. Talk shop with us, shoot the breeze, tell us about some crappy experience you had with the cross-town competition. We're cool with that. Hell, we LOVE hearing about how much the competition sucks. And you imply we do a better job, we're gonna make sure you still think that when you leave.

You still can't do it on my shop floor, tho.

Secondly, I can understand not trusting other folks to work on your stuff. I got guys at my shop I trust, but that's about it. I haven't paid someone to work on my cars in 10 years. But if you can't swallow that distrust long enough to let someone work on your rig or scoot in peace, then I advise you learn to do everything you'll need to do yourself. That's the only way you'll have total peace of mind, and you'll be doing the poor guys who'd be working on your machines a great service of not stressing them the hell out while you look over their shoulders.
 

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I had a VW Corrado delivered to me with no oil in it. Drove home, about 10 miles it had an overheating smell. Checked oil not a drop. Called dealer told me not to worry, said I want a new car, as told no, stopped payment on check. Got new car after that flat bedded that one back to dealer
 

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Luciferiad, I am familiar with the shop BThomas wrote about and can attest that there is ample area where one can observe the wrenches and be well out of the action. I want anyone to show me where it states in an insurance policy that customers can not be in the shop area if out of the way. Maybe there's no such space in your shop, but there is in the one BT and I are familiar with. Incidentally, I am a wrench and I don't mind at all if a customer observes my work--maybe because I am very confident in my skills. Also, I want the customer to be familiar with his/her machine.
Its not the shop that may screw up a job, its the wrench that's working on your stuff and we have no idea about their skills until they commence the job. If we can observe, then those skills, good or bad may become apparent.
I had an experience with my car and a factory franchised dealer's shop where they took three attempts to eliminate a front end noise. When all was said and done, the car received new strut towers, steering rack, steering arms and links. The shop is off limits to customers' eyes, so I could not watch the process of them scamming the factory with all those false warranty claims. Will I go back to them, not on your life. Yet, that could have been prevented had I been able to observe even through glass.
A thing that I do when I have to take my stuff into a shop (one where I can watch) is bring a box of donuts to be shared by the crew. If the job has been done to my satisfaction, I present the guy(s) with a gift Victorinox knife, a line I sell. I usually great service after that.
 

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I can attest that if you're asked to leave a service area, it's because there is a safety and/or LIABILITY concern for your person. If you step into my shop, I'll sure as hell ask you to step back out. I'm pleasant about it, maybe laugh and joke about how you shouldn't climb into the greasemonkey cage. But I will ask you to step out. And I won't back down on it, either. I'm not about to put my employer in a position where they'd have to pay your medical bills because you got a metal sliver in your eye or you tripped on an air hose and cracked your head open. That's the short and skinny of it.
I get that... While I was on the shop floor, I wasn't close enough to the action to get hurt by anything.

, by all means hang out and watch if that's what want to do. You just can't be on my shop floor to do it. Other shops I've worked for have had a waiting room with a window from which you can fishbowl the wrenches, if you're so inclined. My current shop doesn't, which some folks find distressing. I didn't design the building, so that's not on me, and nothing I can do about it. They find it extra distressing during the winter when the weather is damn terrible and it's too cold/wet/snowing to stand near one of the shop doors.

But I got a couple other things to say on the issue still: Firstly, wrenches HATE being watched. But you can make it bearable by making some pleasant conversation. Don't stare at the backs of our heads waiting for a mistake. Making a guy feel like he's ON THE SPOT, being watched, isn't going to improve your service quality. If you're worried the joint is going to try to pull some fast one on you, or break something and not own it, then you shouldn't be there in the first place. Talk shop with us, shoot the breeze, tell us about some crappy experience you had with the cross-town competition. We're cool with that. Hell, we LOVE hearing about how much the competition sucks. And you imply we do a better job, we're gonna make sure you still think that when you leave.
What you said above makes total sense. I wasn't paranoid and watching to keep an eye on the mechanic... I was watching to learn, bs with the guy (who was both really cool and funny), and kind of just out of sheer boredom. The mechanic and I were having a great conversation before the SM got all excited...
You still can't do it on my shop floor, tho.

Secondly, I can understand not trusting other folks to work on your stuff. I got guys at my shop I trust, but that's about it. I haven't paid someone to work on my cars in 10 years. But if you can't swallow that distrust long enough to let someone work on your rig or scoot in peace, then I advise you learn to do everything you'll need to do yourself. That's the only way you'll have total peace of mind, and you'll be doing the poor guys who'd be working on your machines a great service of not stressing them the hell out while you look over their shoulders.
Sorry if I inferred that I was paranoid--I'm not... The big deal for me I guess was the difference between this dealership and the one across town. The other one is a really fun place to visit--the folks there are funny, they reach out to talk to you and actually say hi when you walk in. They ride motorcycles; most of them ride Vics. They even know stuff about them like which model is which and which ones come with ABS and stuff like that...

The other dealership has a really fun crew of three mechanics led by a SM who is really a fun and knowledgable guy and they are totally okay with you hanging out with them while they work...

If you read the rest of my previous post, it kind of explains the whole thing...wasn't just about being ejected from the floor...

I don't know, maybe I was expecting too much or more of a similar experience to what I'm used to when in a Polaris shop when I went in there... Anyway, I'm just one guy who has only bought tires, air filters and oil from them so maybe I wasn't worth the effort it took to make my experience there a memorable one... Thanks for your response--your points are totally valid and are things I will definitely think about on future visits!
 
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