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Discussion Starter #1
Before I retired I did a lot of work in motion control hydraulics and would get sent to hydraulic schools/oil schools pretty regular. You generally get one when you get the other. The classes were very insightful.
Some of it transfers over to motorcycles some doesn't.
I live on a dirt road so normally I have been changing my oil at 2500 to 3000 miles to compensate for the amount of dirt that my bike breathes in should I have to follow someone in or out to the pavement. I use a K&n type filter and keep it cleaned and oiled at about 2500 mile intervals.
With the oil changes I'm wondering if I would be better off just changing the filter at 2500
toping off with fresh oil and running the oil further like to 5000 miles?

I know that once you get the oil in a hydraulic system clean that adding fresh oil to it brings more dirt to the system that your filters must remove. Oil from the refiner just isn't really that clean when you are talking very clean. That is one of the reasons that the industry relied on analysis so heavily even when the price of oil was relatively cheap. I also realize there is a heck of a difference between a modern combustion engine which creates a lot of oil contaminates, acids etc as it runs and a modern hydraulic system which in many cases puts different stresses on the oil.

In your opinion would I have cleaner oil in a victory motor by not changing the oil as often (2500-3000)as I am and changing the filter instead, toping it off and running the oil through to 5000 or so or would I be better served by dumping the oil and the filter at 3000 like I have been. I'm curious?

Thanks
 

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get a paved road. Just kidding
Why not have your oil analyzed at 2500 and at 5000. Ask them to check how much dirt they find. That should tell you when to change oil.
Use good air filter and not k&n. Use top of the line oil filter.
 

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Vindex has posted analysis reports for Rotella T-6 at 2500 and 5000 miles. Report said it can go a lot farther. No indication of dirt road riding though.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
JV that is a good idea.
I'll have to locate some oil analysis kits.
Your no fan of those KN filters. Why?
They are a depth filter in that they only work well when they are filthy.
Which is a little different. But living on a dirt road they get filthy pretty quick.

Ricz
Still using Polaris soup in it till the warranty expires.
Can't seem to get them to honor the warranty anyway so not sure why I bother. :) It is only about 6 more months then I will do something else.

Diesel oil is good stuff, too thin for HD's but from what I read here it works good in the Polaris bikes.
 

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Being both practical and frugal, I have been using Rotella T-6 for a long time and have no complaints whatsoever. With coupons and sales, I get it for @ $20/gallon.
 

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K&N filters let more air in witch means more dirt will get in.
Stock filters will stop dirt from getting in
 

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I notice more and more riders throughout various forums with a seemingly obsessive compulsion to have clean oil in their machines.

Bottom line, always best to change often with fewer miles. This is good! However, is it really necessary?

I don't think so with the technology in both our engines and the oil that we now have available.

Guys that run the crap out of their bikes should change often. Those that live in pretty filthy areas... same thing!

For the regular guy (me! :D) 5000 miles with a good oil like T6 or Amsoil. This includes decent working oil filter. Air filter brands don't really matter that much... some makers just want your money. Shoot! The same bunch that make average filters also make that one you think is like gold.

You all make your own choices but I do not worry about my oil and filters. Oil is supposed to collect dirt and look nasty. I sort of think we all could go longer than we do.

As long as we all use common sense in how we maintain our bikes, we can feel confident and just ride.

I will mention that my good friend is a diesel mech and he says that T6 is a great oil for our bikes.

This year 2 guys locally have died from blowouts so please take care of your tires. I have no idea what happened... can only imagine that they over-reacted when the tire blew but it makes me cautious.

Ride safe!
 

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The thought that you will get dirt entry into an engine if you live on a dirt road really puzzles me. There should be zero dirt entry, any amount of dirt is detrimental to a internal combustion engine.
How does it get in? Why would it only get in on a dirt road?

Construction equipment and farm equipment operate in dirty conditions with zero dirt entry. If you have dirt entry into the engine something is wrong.

If you want to change your oil just in case it may have dirt entry, it does little good. The damage is done if you have dirt entry.

Most of the dirt entries I have encountered are on the intake side of things. So the dirt entered the engine in the air fuel mixture and does it damage there, in the cylinder. This inturn increases wear on the cylinder and rings first, its what is called dusting a engine.
Short story, one can change the oil but the cylinders are still dusted. It might save the bottom end but not for long the dirt has already accelerated the wear.

If one suspects dirt entry, Spend the $$ on a oil analysis to determine if you have dirt entry, if the OA shows high silicone, you have dirt entry and you must find where it is entering the system.

Granted my experience is in off road equipment but it is all relative.
 
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