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Discussion Starter #1
Just when I had this machine running perfect (2014 Hammer 8 Ball) I went on a poker run and on the way home pushed it a little too far with racking up the miles on one tank. The idiot light screamed at me several times until I finally pulled into a Sunoco to fill up (always 91or 93 octane depending on the station). The odometer read 168 miles and it took pretty close to 4 gallons. A day or so later I took off for the local back roads and noticed the engine sputtering when twisting the throttle quickly. Rolling the throttle easy up through the rpms there’s no issue. Only with a quick twist does it hesitate. Plus is just doesn’t seem to have the full power it did prior to that almost empty tank. Was it dirty gas? I don’t know. The paint around the filler opening is chipped (why does Victory do this?) so I suppose there may be paint particles on the bottom of the tank that got sucked into the filter. I only have 5300 miles on this bike so I’m sure (hoping) there’s no mechanical issues.
I checked around and Bike Bandit has the oem filter for $95. I’ve never had this thing taken apart so I don’t know what I’m getting myself into if I change the filter myself. I’m pretty mechanically inclined but don’t own a garage.
Any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So the strainer is an additional protection? I’ve seen these advertised and they make sense. As far as a cracked throttle body on a machine that’s 5 years old and under 6000 miles, is that possible? Are Victory’ known for this and is this something I can check myself?
As far as the fuel filter, how difficult is it to get to? I know it’s inside the tank but do I need any special tools?
Sorry for so many questions. I’d rather do it myself and save money if possible.
 

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No special tools per se but you do need to pull and empty the tank, turn it upside down on something soft like towels, then pull the panel. It can be a little tricky maneuvering the pump out.

YouTube is a great resource. I'm using it to rebuild a V6 Toyota engine that overheated. No fault of Toyota.

 

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Are you sure you didn't get some bad gas (water in gas) This happened to one of my buddies. Bike ran ok until he would get on it hard. It would cut out,sputter and backfire. He dumped the gas and all was fine. I would be surprised if the filter plugged that quick with that low of mileage.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ok, A lot to think about. Thanks to all for the feedback and the video links!
I’ve been through several tanks of gas since this started happening and it hasn’t gotten any better but it hasn’t gotten any worse. In fact sometimes it doesn’t happen at all. Maybe a bottle of “dry gas” is a cheap way to rule out any water in the tank. After that I think the first action to take is to check the throttle body for cracks and go from there. I don’t know how the bike was stored before I bought it and with such low mileage it obviously wasn’t ridden very much.
I still welcome any additional information from all with experience!
I’ll keep you posted and I’m sure I’ll have more questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It’s just been too damn hot work on my bike and almost too hot to ride, but I’ve been riding anyway.

So I was experimenting with the problem I have with the engine hesitating when twisting the throttle quickly. I did this several times at different rpms and it seems to hesitate only below 3000 rpms. Above 3000 rpms no hesitating. I don’t know if this means anything but I just wanted to throw that information out there to see if hesitating in that rpm range points to anything in particular other than cracked throttle body. Again thanks for all input!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Dirty fuel filter? Problem Solved!

Sorry if I make a short story long ...
Yes, I tried the Seafoam and while it seemed to run a little better it did not take care of the hesitation issue.
The humidity level here in eastern Pennsylvania finally dropped along with the heat and I just happen to have the day off from work so I went outside to check things out. When I hit the starter button the engine didn’t kick in right away So I tried it again, and when it did start it sounded like it was running on one cylinder. So I shut it off, pulled the spark plug wires off and reseated them, hit the starter again and it still was only running on one cylinder so I shut it off again. I kneel down and watched the spark plug area while I started it again and that’s when I noticed a tiny spark jumping from the front cylinder spark plug wire to the head. Upon closer inspection I noticed a stray single strand of wire coming out from where the boot meets the wire. That tiny wire obviously was letting electricity find the easiest path to ground rather than going to the spark plug. So I got a pair of wire cutters and cut it as closely to the point of egress as possible. Hit the starter again and it turned over immediately and ran smooth. A big smile went across my face and I hopped on the bike and took off with no more hesitation at all. I’m pretty sure I feel a little more power than I’ve had in the past few weeks.
These were brand new wires. This was just a slight manufacturing defect that this single strand was sticking out of the boot. Something so tiny I overlooked while installing these new wires a few weeks back. Something so tiny caused me so many headaches trying to figure out what was wrong. But everything is back to normal now. I even treated my baby to a tank of non-ethanol premium gas, which was surprisingly only nine cents more a gallon than the other premium gas is around.
Thanks for everybody’s input anyway! I’m sure glad I didn’t start tearing things apart and start spending money when all I had to do was inspect the wires before I put them on. Live and learn!
 

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Very glad to hear you found the problem and it was a simple fix and thanks for coming back to tell us about it. So many forget to do that.

This is a perfect example of how forums can be helpful in fixing a problem but they are not a replacement for actually being there with hands on.

It's also a good example of looking at the last place the bike was worked on. More than likely the issue is there.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yes. The issue was caused by the very thing done to improve performance. Or more specifically upgrade.
I find it interesting that the hesitation (miss-fire) issue didn’t occur immediately after replacing the spark plug wires, but about a week after. And even then it only happened below 3000 rpm on hard acceleration. I can only imagine that little tiny wire moving around at certain speeds, being blown back and forth just enough to get close enough to the fin on the head to cause that arc, intermittently diverting the electrical circuit away from normal spark plug operation.
These were reputable spark plug wires (Sumax 86075 Thundervolt by Taylor 10.4mm) so I never expected any sort of defect, no matter how small. Especially one that would impact performance!
Now my issue is to not get pulled over while I get high on the acceleration of the Hammer!
 

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Hmm So wonder if you wrote Taylor and told them your problem and maybe linked it here they would send you a new set? I was recently looking at a set of their wires I think over @ Witch Doctors. They aint cheap for sure $40 or so.
On the why @ under 3K rpm? At that rpm the motor and spark are for lack of better term "lazy" Once RPM goes up there is a bit more power pushing the spark and it can then push thru the resistor in the plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The rpm relationship puzzled me too. The stray strand of wire was about an inch long (it was black so it could have been part of the shielding ?) so the only thing I could think of is certain air turbulence in that that vicinity pushed it closer to the head sporadically? It probably never had anything to do with the RPMs. I just don’t know. I still don’t know how I missed seeing that little thing sticking out when I installed them. Blinded by the excitement of something new no doubt.
Maybe I will write the company just to see if anything will come out of it, you never know.
 
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