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New and VERY HAPPY 16 XCT owner. Had to finally get off the dresser (just under 100k mi in 3 yrs), maint costs were putting a considerable dent in my wallet. I put anywhere from 25-35k/yr on my scoots (don't own a cage) and the only American machine I found that seemed to stand up to and exceed that expectation was the XCT. Only thing I don't care for is that a moped is louder that this beast (but soon to be roaring). Love living and riding in Florida year round.
 

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Welcome from AZ I ride year around also my truck sits on a battery tender not the bike :wink
 

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Welcome from MN.. We can't ride now.....:(

Think ill guna move down by Vin.....
 

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Welcome from CT.
 

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Welcome from Alabama (Soon to be North Carolina)! I got a buddy looking to get a CVO Street Glide from a 103 Street Glide. I've shown him multiple postings of the good and the bad... He should stick with the 103. His family has been on Harley since before he was born, so if I were to show him anything Victory, it would be like trying to change his DNA.
 

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Welcome from upstate NY.

As the owner of 2012 XCT, with about 32,000 miles on it (and sitting quietly for the winter), I have a few suggestions for you. The XCT is my favorite bike of those that I've owned, but no bike is perfect. And unless you've been spending a ton of time reading forums, here are things you might want to be aware of as a new XCT owner.

XCT-Specific Items:

- The lower fairings -- the pods on the crashbars, the things with the doors -- have a habit of creeping inward. If you're not careful, the fairing winglets (the clear plastic things attached to the upper fairing) can touch the lowers, if the winglets are set to block wind and the handlebars are turned almost full lock. I added sticky tape to the crashbars, underneath the three clamps that hold on the lowers, to prevent their movement.

- There is a circlip on the single bolt on each side that holds the passenger mini-boards in place. This can fall off, in which case the bolt can work itself out, in which case the mini-board will fall off. After replacing one circlip, I slathered both circlips with permanent thread locker, and this has worked for several years now. A few XCT owners have drilled through the bolts, and added cotter pins.

- Don't let trunk lid flop into position when you open it, as you may eventually break something. Instead, open it all the way by hand, and then the wire/bolt system will hold it in place.

- I assume in FL you don't need the stock tall XCT windshield. If you remove the XCT-only brackets that hold that windshield in place, you can buy and use any of the many XC-aftermarket windshields.

XC- and XCT-Items:

- Only use a hand pump to add air to the shock, as a compressor may break things. The Vic pump (not included) is made by Fox, so it (or a similar one) can be obtained more cheaply than the Vic one.

- Make sure you put your side covers back on properly, i.e., all three barbs are snapped in their grommets, if you take the side covers off. Some folks have lost side covers, or had them damaged as they almost fell off. You may want to replace aging grommets (about a dollar each) periodically. On a suggestion here, I've also shrunk heat-shrink tubing on one barb (the upper front one) on each side, to make for a nice snug fit.

- On a similar note, you may want to replace the front or both Dzus fasteners on each saddlebag. There have been a couple of threads regarding on-road lost saddlebags; also, the stock system makes stealing saddlebags fairly easy. When this subject comes up, it's almost like an oil thread, with the differing opinions. Some people buy the Brukus saddle-secure system, some split a Brukus system with a friend (using only one bolt each per bag), and some buy similar hardware at their local hardware store.

- Speaking of saddlebags, keep an eye on the right-side (as sitting on the bike) latch, as this wears prematurely. I don't know whether Vic has fixed this on the '16s, but there's sort of a recall on this. And there are several DIY fixes, involving an added washer or elongating the bolt holes in the latch loop.

- You might want to mess with the battery-terminal bolts, as loose connections here cause a bunch of problems, and as the official torque spec is too low. To access the battery, you remove the chin plastic by taking out four 4mm hex-head bolts (two underneath the bike, two near the top). As suggested a long time ago here, I added (1/4") tooth washers to the bolts. I also added medium thread-locker to the bottom half of the bolts, and dielectric grease to the top half, and added a sort of terminal-extension gizmo so I don't have to mess with the bolts when adding electrical devices.

- Changing the oil on these bikes is ridiculously easy (and only one place to change it). But you do know that you check it with the bike level, right? And don't overfill it. And don't over-torque the drain bolt.

- While you're changing the oil, grease the pivot cylinders at the top and bottom of the clutch cable. I don't know if your Harley had a hydraulic clutch, but these don't, and you don't want your cable to break.

- You do know that the Cross bikes have a neutral-assist feature, right? I ask, because this just came up the other day with someone new to these bikes. If you're stopped or going very slowly (under 5MPH, I think), when you shift up from first, you go into neutral, period -- not second. You don't have to look for neutral "in the middle," it's all you get. This is nice, but it means that when you take off, make sure you're beyond this threshold -- say, 10MPH or more -- before you shift up.

- Speaking of shifting, don't baby and don't lug these bikes. The shift points (and red line) are likely higher than the H-Ds you're used to.

- And also re shifting, I found that the return stroke was longer than I was used to. (I've owned four bikes in 18 years now, test ride Harleys and everything else at the Americade rally each year, and rode 20 or so smaller bikes when I was an MSF instructor, so I think I've been exposed to a fair number of bikes.) Back to the return stroke: in the first few weeks of XCT ownership, I was having trouble downshifting a few gears at once, i.e., with the clutch pulled in, when coming to a stop. I eventually figured out that I was not letting the shifter return stroke complete, i.e., I was not raising my foot high enough after each shift. So I reprogrammed myself.

- Even with EFI, the Vic gurus recommend holding the throttle cracked a bit when starting, especially when the engine's cold. And don't be a hurry to let go of the starter button, i.e., don't just tap it, in case of a potential backfire (which would then break things).

That's all that comes to mind, regarding stuff that you may not be used to, and that are not, of course, mentioned in the owner's manual.

And now you can start researching pipes, and cams, and timing wheels, and...

Hope you find some of this useful.
 

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Even with EFI, the Vic gurus recommend holding the throttle cracked a bit when starting, especially when the engine's cold. And don't be a hurry to let go of the starter button, i.e., don't just tap it, in case of a potential backfire (which would then break things).
That being said, here is a little better understanding of the starter.
 

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+1 on seeing Kevin X for engine/exhaust mods, but a lot of it is fun to do yourself. If you know which end of the screwdriver is the handle, you can do them. Hell, I'm 79 and have done all my own. No dyno here, so I get by with Lloydz VFCIII seat of the pants controller. See my sig for my mods.
 

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Congratulations on your excellent taste in motorcycles with the CCT. And welcome from TN. There are a lot of great people here who are very knowledgeable with these bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Sir I want to thank you for taking the time to put together your thoughts and guidance for a new V owner. I know how to ride but have MUCH to learn about these scoots. I will be looking it over one line item, nut and bolt at a time because I am just that way. Safe travels on the road!
 
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