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I picked up a used 2011 XR 2500 miles on it. The original owner told me he had the dealer "make the pipes loud" before ever picking it up. When I took the bike for a test ride it did sound great, but it backfired regulaly and popped constantly. I put a Llyods fuel Controller on it so I could add more fuel. Amazingly the bike would run best with the idle setting at its lowest (#1). whenever I tried to set the controller for more fuel the backfiring got worse.
Then the scariest thing happened. I was on the throttle quite spiritedly and came up on a nice right hand turn. I wacked the throttle off as a entered a right hand turn and the back tire locked up completely! I was thrown on to the handle bars as the bike started a full slide, handle bars pinned on the stop to the left. I quickly grabbed the clutch and rolled to a stop.
WHAT THE ________?!!!

Best I can figure is the motor backfired bad enough to stop the motor solid.

TIME TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM. I took the mufflers off and realized they had NO BAFFLES AT ALL ( no wonder it sounded so good).
I ordered a set of Bassani slip ons and thank God it solved the backfiring and popping problem.

The bike runs best with the Llyods idle setting at 2 or 2.5 which is still suprising but I am not sure what the Dealer did to the settings when he took the baffles out. I alway thought back firing was a sign the bike is too lean not too rich. Oh well it runs good now.

I am not Mr. safety but I wanted to put this on a forum to say, No baffles and a backfiring bike almost caused me to crash big time. Be careful folks, my Victory likes back pressure and with out it, it is dangerous to ride.
 

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Not that I am doubting your experience... but something else besides having mufflers without baffles is going on here. Just doesn't compute.
 

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Not that I am doubting your experience... but something else besides having mufflers without baffles is going on here. Just doesn't compute.
I would agree. Are the O2 sensors still connected? Many recommended removign them if you have de-baffled the pipes but doing so "short cuts" the programming so unless you re-connected the O2 sensors, the tuner may not have been able to control the fuel correctly, right? Perhaps the bike has a history of other failures/lock ups that you simply did not know about & it may happen again in the future even with the new set up or not (if your new dealer changed the air/fuel map when he added the Bassanis...
 

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Do I understand you to say there is a Lloydz controller on your bike? If so, the O2 sensors must be disconnected.
 

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Similar experience

There has been the odd time when I am downshifting and my machine stalls. When I downshift I don't simply grab the clutch and then hit the shifter, I give it some gas as I am going down. This is how I decelerate. A small crack of throttle through each gear, quite typical.

Anyhow, every now and then the bike stalls when I am downshifting. The first time it did it I was new on that machine and the stereo was loud. As I couln't hear my pipes and wasn't looking at the dash, I just let out the clutch to keep down shifting and obviously my rear wheel locked up on me. That woke me up.

You maybe just stalled your machine. Mine was bone stock when this happened.
 

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There has been the odd time when I am downshifting and my machine stalls. When I downshift I don't simply grab the clutch and then hit the shifter, I give it some gas as I am going down. This is how I decelerate. A small crack of throttle through each gear, quite typical.

Anyhow, every now and then the bike stalls when I am downshifting. The first time it did it I was new on that machine and the stereo was loud. As I couln't hear my pipes and wasn't looking at the dash, I just let out the clutch to keep down shifting and obviously my rear wheel locked up on me. That woke me up.

You maybe just stalled your machine. Mine was bone stock when this happened.
You can not blip the throttle
 

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You can not blip the throttle
Exactly. Had to break my brother of this habit (although I don't know why you would do it anyway other than for the sole purpose of hearing your pipes). I just decelerate
 

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Can you guys expand on what you mean for us noobs. "You can not blip the throttle"? Do you mean that you "should not"?

"I just decelerate". Do you mean by downshifting or just by using your brakes?

The reason I avoid downshifting is because of that annoying gurgling sound I get out of my unbaffled pipes. I do downshift some, but I also just use my brakes a lot. Is that bad other than just wearing out my pads?

Thanks for the info. :)
 

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I will use a combination of engine braking and actually using my brakes. The 'annoying gurgling sound' you get actually doesn't bother me at all. I actually don't get that unless I let the RPMs come down very low (<1500) while engine braking. I tend to use engine braking more because it does keep wear off your pads and adds no excessive wear to your engine.

You 'should not' blip the throttle because you are just dumping fuel into an unloaded engine. This tends to cause backfires through the intake quite often from what I have seen. Now I am by no means a Vic tech, but just going by what personal experience I have had.

Basically, I don't blip the throttle on any decel or waiting at a light. I rely on engine braking/brakes to slow down.

Hope that helps.
 

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It does thank you. :)
 

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You have other problems there, not pipes or controller or backfiring. It sounds like you had the bike ran up way too high in whatever gear you were in thus causing the slide when you let off. Hence the reason you were able to control it when you pulled in the clutch.

On top of that, a XR aint a crotch rocket.
 

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Exactly. Had to break my brother of this habit (although I don't know why you would do it anyway other than for the sole purpose of hearing your pipes). I just decelerate
this is a tuff habit to break- for me anyway. Blipping the throttle to match up speed and rpm. I am running shotgun pipes, I think i am going to try some baffles to stop the popping on decell. It is only popping at the upper rpm range, if i am nice to it it doesn't pop. IMHO baffles can be a good thing. I will try unhooking the O2 first, but this is something i would rather not resort to.

m
 

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cheersI gutted my pipes a while ago, and they pop 5-10% as much as they used to. That is after I pulled my O2 sensors out. cheers
 

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Blipping the throttle IS the proper way to downshift. WTH are you two talking about? :confused:

And blipping the throttle has absolutely nothing to do with a bike stalling. You can't cause a bike to stall from giving it throttle during a downshift.
 

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Of course blipping the throttle (rev-matching) is the best way to downshift. It reduces wear and tear on your clutch as well as your brakes.

It also eliminates the issue of locking up your rear tire, or getting wheelhop when the tire rotation is much faster than the engine speed.

When done properly, you drop gears seamlessly and smoothly and will decelerate faster, with less effort.
 

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Article by Keith Code:



Sometimes, the smallest changes make the biggest differences. One of the first skills a rider learns is how to simultaneously brake and downshift. But how many riders focus their attention on making this action smooth and effortless? Sure, a hurried and slightly frantic approach doesn't sound like a life-or-death situation, but the lack of it can lead to far bigger issues.

If a rider doesn't brake and downshift smoothly, he faces one of the following situations with the accompanying consequences:

1. Slowly letting out the clutch to make the downshift smooth: Most uneducated riders handle things this way, but it requires tremendous concentration.

2. Changing gears once the bike is stopped: Even the best transmissions can be sticky.

3. Changing gear after braking is completed: This often means doing it in a corner, which is distracting and can upset the bike-to say nothing of the rider.

4. Alternately going from the brake to the gas to match revs: This makes the bike pogo at the front.

5. Downshifting before braking: This is fine for relaxed riding situations at slow speeds, but is hazardous to the engine if the rider is in "spirited" mode because it provides the opportunity to over-rev the engine. And in an emergency, you don't have time to do this. Some emergencies require you to brake and then get on the gas right away to avoid things like cars.

6. Forget it entirely and just roll through the corner: This forces a downshift at the corner exit, when you should be rolling on the throttle, ruining your drive. It's distracting and not smooth at all.

Yes, an uncoordinated rider attempting simultaneous braking and downshifting can be dangerous. Applying the front brakes while the power is on can cause the front wheel to lock up. On my panic-stop training bike, I have seen it many times: A rider aggressively squeezes the brake and unconsciously rolls the throttle on at the same time. It's spooky to watch. Practice and coordination are necessary. It's like a dance and you have to make a decision. Can the six potential situations above cause trouble? Absolutely-in part because each breaks the rider's concentration, however slightly. If you aren't a superhero at multi-tasking, each option is a negative compared to braking and downshifting simultaneously.

What's the solution, then? Continuous perception of your speed. Accurate turn-entry speed is critical to confident cornering. If you're worried about your speed, you're distracted by it. Finding the right turn-entry speed-for you-is far easier when braking and downshifting happen in one continuous flow. Your sense of speed is a precious resource and is far more accurate when monitored as a steady stream of constant awareness. Your communication with the machine improves; there are no false signals or guess work; no waiting to know how the bike will respond in any of the above scenarios. Your ability to maintain communication with the bike is important input.
Honda Cbr Front Shot
Learning to brake and downshift simultaneously can make you a smoother, and in turn quicke

The following sequence creates the ideal set of situations:

1. Gas off.

2. Brakes on.

3. Bike slows and revs come down rapidly.

4. Clutch in. Maintain consistent brake-lever pressure.

5. Blip the gas quickly on and off, usually no more than a quarter-turn. Maintain consistent brake-lever pressure.

6. During the blip, make the gear change positively and quickly. Maintain consistent brake-lever pressure.

7. Clutch out. Maintain or modulate brake-lever pressure until desired turn-entry speed is achieved.

8. Release brakes smoothly.

After the initial brake application, the quicker you do steps 1 through 7, the better. Expert use of the brakes during this entire cycle means that you can maintain, increase or decrease the pressure as desired without abruptly stabbing or releasing the lever. How many fingers you grab the front brake lever with is up to you, although I recommend you use just two: your index and middle fingers. That leaves your two outside fingers to blip the throttle along with your thumb.

Braking is important: It's life-and-death on the street and vital on the track. Changing gears is not. You can still make it through the corner or get the bike stopped without ever touching the gears. Even if you have a slipper clutch, give this a shot. It can take a while for some riders, but gives tremendous satisfaction once mastered.





Perhaps another owner of a motorcycle training school with equal experience can tell us why you shouldn't blip the throttle? thumb up
 

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Article by Keith Code...
What does Keith Code have to do with Victory motorcycles? Victory says not to blip the throttle, and you give us an article from a former motorcycle racer on throttle blipping. :confused:


Of course blipping the throttle (rev-matching) is the best way to downshift...
Maybe on a sports bike that redlines at 15,000 RPM, not a Vic cruiser.
 

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That blip described is for smoother gear change from high rpm. I do similar in my big rig when shiftet hangs.

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Blipping the throttle IS the proper way to downshift. WTH are you two talking about? :confused:
I do it numerous times a day and my machine has never locked up nor died. I think I have brought it to climax on a few occasions however.
 
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