Victory Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A lousy experience, that ended much better than it might have.

I was FAR from home and took a wrong turn near Blair OK.

Dirt road. Not a big deal, I'm often on dirt or gravel.

However, in the midst of making a couple of turns to get back on the main road, this thing unexpectedly turned to deep sand. Pretty soon the back tire started wandering and I was down.

No harm done, but an impossible situation. Could not get the bike up, but even if I could, it was sideways in the road, halfway up the tires in sand and nosed up against the bank.

Down the road a ways, a white pickup was eyeing my position, and he drove up.

I really appreciated the company, but still saw no way out of the situation.

Things got worse as I called AAA, got switched from TEXAS (my membership) to Oklahoma, and told, "The driver won't go 50 feet off the pavement".

Said goodbye to AAA and turned my attention back to my new friend, who was calling HIS friend. Told me the Vision was so big he thought it was TWO bikes down.

It didn't seem but a few minutes until I had a couple of strong thirtysomething country boys helping me move the bike.

I got on, started forward and fell again, and repeat, and repeat.

Breathing hard.

They got me back to clay road.

Wouldn't take money.

I really lucked out when they showed up. Great guys!

There's not a mark on the bike.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,988 Posts
Glad to hear you were fortunate to have helpers around. Note to self: avoid sand at all costs. :D Thanks for sharing. thumb up
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,707 Posts
Same thing happened to me down around the Salton Sea in SoCal about a month ago. Finally got some help to get the bike up but then promptly buried it right up the swingarm. While trying to call a tow truck some local Native American kids showed up and muscled the bike out of the sand, got it turned around, and on to hard asphalt.

I felt really stupid for making such a rookie mistake. Gave 'em $40 for some brews and burgers for their help. If they hadn't come along; It could have been bad 'cause I was already showing signs of severe heat stroke. They even brought a big cooler of water which I soaked up like a sponge. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
659 Posts
Big bikes and dirt roads do not mix well. Sand is even worse. Glad you found help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
Problem with anything but paved, you have no clue what's a head of you. Been a a few dirt that turned into loose dirt and almost lost it in the turns, then of course gravel was next.... then came the down hill turn... thank goodness I was with friends. Tennessee hills and GPS, GPS never knows condition of roads. Be careful! It took my motorhome down a switch back, single lane, with a bridge hardly able to hold my size and weight. My emergency brakes were locked and I was still sliding down the inclined gravel roads. It was marked as a major road too. I thought I had it. Stick to paved!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
It didn't seem like two minutes until I had two strong thirtysomething country boys helping me move the bike.

I got on, started forward and fell again, and repeat, and repeat.

Breathing hard.

They got me back to clay road.

Wouldn't take money.

I really lucked out when they showed up. Great guys!

There's not a mark on the bike.
southern hospitality cheers
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,707 Posts
Problem with anything but paved, you have no clue what's a head of you. Been a a few dirt that turned into loose dirt and almost lost it in the turns, then of course gravel was next.... then came the down hill turn... thank goodness I was with friends. Tennessee hills and GPS, GPS never knows condition of roads. Be careful! It took my motorhome down a switch back, single lane, with a bridge hardly able to hold my size and weight. My emergency brakes were locked and I was still sliding down the inclined gravel roads. It was marked as a major road too. I thought I had it. Stick to paved!!!
As a general rule I agree with sticking to paved roads but there are some places where entire neighborhoods have dirt roads. Mostly maintained and hard-packed but dirt nonetheless.

Overall I agree though and even though I should have known better before; I doubly know it now. :D

Also; dirt roads can be hell on a belt driven bike if any of the small rocks get between the belt and pulley and the pulley is too tight. thumb upcheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
In June my girlfriend and I were on a long road trip to Colorado and found ourselves on a dirt road to Crested Butte. The dirt wasn't all that bad if yiou were careful. What made matters worse was the magnesium chloride they use to melt snow and apparently help the dirt to pack down. I am here to tell you it is slicker than snot to ride on. I wasn't smart enough to turn around (and to be honest the road was narrow enough to make turning around more of a challenge than going straight) so we kept going for 35 miles. Of which about 10 of it was mag chloride. The good news was that we kept it upright the whole way (although we had a few close calls) and made it to Crested Butte. The bad news is that mag chloride makes a horrendous mess of the bike and it difficult to remove. Note to self - stay away from magnesium chloride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
Been to Crested Butte in winter. I want to go back in summer, and was always warned about "transition" season when the snow starts melting and coming down the mountain. Supose to be a real mud bath and you need a 4x vehicle.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top