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Discussion Starter #1
I understand the reasons and why's but have a question. If I wanted to go out for a ride how long does the motor need to be ran to ward off moisture building up? Weather will be in the 40s for the next few days dropping off into the 30's at night. Is it just best to not ride?
 

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It's not going to hurt it if you choose to ride it for a few minutes or longer. Naturally, the longer the ride, the better.

The problem with any bike is letting it sit for long periods of time (several weeks) in cold weather without properly maintaining it. Here in the south, I know that I am going to be riding it all through our winter time which does not compare to many other areas. So, I can get by with letting it sit for a few days in my garage.

The ethanol in our our tanks can definitely do harm to hoses so you would need a fuel additive.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The ethanol in our our tanks can definitely do harm to hoses so you would need a fuel additive.
This is essentially why I want to ride it. to get the fuel treatment ran through the bike. I filled it up a week or two ago but didn't have the additive yet :frown
 

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I understand the reasons and why's but have a question. If I wanted to go out for a ride how long does the motor need to be ran to ward off moisture building up? Weather will be in the 40s for the next few days dropping off into the 30's at night. Is it just best to not ride?
Just ride the bike, 30/40 isn't cold, Least not for the bike...
 

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starting bike and not riding a good half hour or more you'll form condensation in the motor and gas tank. Condensation is water if you don't know. Just starting and letting idle for ten or fifteen minutes does no good. You'll foul the plugs and destroy the oil.
My bike sits in the garage for 5 months the coldest it gets is maybe 10 above. Out of the thirty some bikes I have owned I have never had a problem.

When you ride at 40 degrees or colder you should block off oil cooler.
Put a light bulb that creates heat under the motor for easier starting.
Crack the throttle a 1/8" and hold it there before pushing button so you don't get that bike fire and take out the starter.
 

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If you start the bike, ride if for at least 15 minutes and it should be fine. This will get all the parts hot enough to evaporate any water which has formed due to the combustion or condensation into the oil. Riding it for 15 minutes minimum is different than starting it and idling it for 15 minutes. Go ahead and do the former. Don't do the latter. Rather than start and idle it, just leave it unstarted all winter. Of course, the best approach is to go someplace warm for the winter and bring the bike :)

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Phil....It's OK to ride in any weather, but the important thing is to ride long enough to COMPLETELY warm up the engine. That's going to be at least a 20 minute ride. Its important to get the oil up to operating temperature to expel the moisture it accumulated. In the winter, I have a bottle of fuel stabilizer in the case and put some in when filling up on the way home. That way, its all through the system and the tank is full to prevent rust. Also, not knowing when the next ride will be, I keep it on an automatic trickle charger. That's all I do to semi-hibernate my bike cuz riding opportunities pop up throughout the winter. And when they do, I place a space heater near the engine at least a half hour before starting. That warms and thins the oil; warms and energizes the battery; warms the cylinders a bit and all that makes life a lot easier on the starter and battery.
One thing one should never do during hibernation is start the engine and run it a few minutes. That does far more damage than good. Its best to let it sit until a long enough ride/drive is in order.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think it's crazy all the do's and don'ts of riding. Not that I don't understand but it just seems like allot. I have no space heater for warming the bike prior to a ride. This is understandable but just seems funny to me. I obviously have never known anything about caring for a bike. I truly never knew they needed such pampering.
 

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I think it's crazy all the do's and don'ts of riding. Not that I don't understand but it just seems like allot. I have no space heater for warming the bike prior to a ride. This is understandable but just seems funny to me. I obviously have never known anything about caring for a bike. I truly never knew they needed such pampering.
Well, it's all about how long you want the bike and its guts to last. And how easy it is to start in the spring. RicZ has good advice there.

My bike is out of commission for -- sigh -- four or five months every year. What I do is:

- As the end of the season approaches, I go out of my way to put E0 (i.e., ethanol-free) gas in. If I'm wrong, i.e., I go for another ride, repeat as necessary.

There's a free app called Pure Gas that will locate the nearest E0 sellers for you. I happen to have one about 3 miles in one direction, and 5 miles in the other direction. So, coming to the end of a potentially season-ending ride, I carry some Star-Tron in a saddlebag, top off the bike at the gas station, add Star-Tron, and ride home. The 3 miles is plenty to get the stabilizer mixed in.

- This process also obviously accomplishes another goal: a full tank, to minimize the ability of rust to form.

- Plug in a smart-charger. That's no big deal to me, because I do that during riding season, too.

- A good detailing and waxing, on a warmish day in the garage.

- I resist the temptation to ride at all during those months (and certainly don't start the bike). This is only a little painful to me, because most of the time there's snow on the road, or salt on the road, or ice on the road, or wet leaves on the road, or it's just plain cold. And few hours of daylight. Yeah, there are a couple of nice days when none of this is the case (except for the early sundown), so on those few days I just suck it up.

This is wordier than the actual stuff, which only amounts to: full tank, real gas, stabilizer, smart-charger.

It's been my experience for nearly 20 years of bikes that this will ensure the bike (or lawnmower, or snow blower, or weed whacker) fires right up in the spring, which is really what I'm after. No gummed up carbs (prior bikes) or fuel injectors, and minimizing rust.

Some folks go through an oil change before or after storage (or both). And some folks take out the plugs and fog the cylinders. And some folks bring their battery in the house. And put carpet or wood under the tires. I don't do any of that -- not that I claim they're wrong, but you have to draw the line someplace, and that's where I draw mine.

Even so, I don't want to re-do my minimal winter setup for a few days of potential riding. That's me.
 

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I think it's crazy all the do's and don'ts of riding. Not that I don't understand but it just seems like allot. I have no space heater for warming the bike prior to a ride. This is understandable but just seems funny to me. I obviously have never known anything about caring for a bike. I truly never knew they needed such pampering.
Block off the oil cooler ' Put a light bulb next to the cooler, Whats next, Change the brake in fluid, Add antifreeze to the blinker fluid.... Just ride the thing, You bought it to ride, Don't let the worry-warts scare you.. :laugh:laugh
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, it's all about how long you want the bike and its guts to last. And how easy it is to start in the spring. RicZ has good advice there.

My bike is out of commission for -- sigh -- four or five months every year. What I do is:

- As the end of the season approaches, I go out of my way to put E0 (i.e., ethanol-free) gas in. If I'm wrong, i.e., I go for another ride, repeat as necessary.

There's a free app called Pure Gas that will locate the nearest E0 sellers for you. I happen to have one about 3 miles in one direction, and 5 miles in the other direction. So, coming to the end of a potentially season-ending ride, I carry some Star-Tron in a saddlebag, top off the bike at the gas station, add Star-Tron, and ride home. The 3 miles is plenty to get the stabilizer mixed in.

- This process also obviously accomplishes another goal: a full tank, to minimize the ability of rust to form.

- Plug in a smart-charger. That's no big deal to me, because I do that during riding season, too.

- A good detailing and waxing, on a warmish day in the garage.

- I resist the temptation to ride at all during those months (and certainly don't start the bike). This is only a little painful to me, because most of the time there's snow on the road, or salt on the road, or ice on the road, or wet leaves on the road, or it's just plain cold. And few hours of daylight. Yeah, there are a couple of nice days when none of this is the case (except for the early sundown), so on those few days I just suck it up.

This is wordier than the actual stuff, which only amounts to: full tank, real gas, stabilizer, smart-charger.

It's been my experience for nearly 20 years of bikes that this will ensure the bike (or lawnmower, or snow blower, or weed whacker) fires right up in the spring, which is really what I'm after. No gummed up carbs (prior bikes) or fuel injectors, and minimizing rust.

Some folks go through an oil change before or after storage (or both). And some folks take out the plugs and fog the cylinders. And some folks bring their battery in the house. And put carpet or wood under the tires. I don't do any of that -- not that I claim they're wrong, but you have to draw the line someplace, and that's where I draw mine.

Even so, I don't want to re-do my minimal winter setup for a few days of potential riding. That's me.
My problem is my addiction to riding. It's all I want to do anymore. (Thank god drinking aint my thing.) I do have my bike on a chunk of carpet we had left over from getting new. I went out for about an hour total and it does my soul good to be riding. I have the Bike hooked to a Battery tender and my bike always has a new coat of wax on it lol. Bought some fogging spray and gave the cylinders a shot. It says to pull the air filter and run it through the carbs but I didn't do that. Also read that it's good to shoot some WD40 up the exhaust and plug them off with rags. I figure the fogging oil must be about the same so I ran a bit of that up my pipes. I am going to do my best to leave it sit but god knows I am a weak man lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Phil , I would avoid riding in snow and ice at all costs ......
OK, I am smarter than a rock for god's sake:grin
Out of all the winters I hope we have a doozey this year even if it means no riding. We are so hurting for water we need some serious snow pack on our mountain.
 

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Block off the oil cooler ' Put a light bulb next to the cooler, Whats next, Change the brake in fluid, Add antifreeze to the blinker fluid.... Just ride the thing, You bought it to ride, Don't let the worry-warts scare you.. :laugh:laugh
So what's wrong with giving fellow riders some tips.

You're the fool and anyone reads your information will be fools
 

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good tip

blocking the oil cooler is a good thought, dumping that 20-whatever dino oil is even smarter, the 20 weight's poor startup flow can cause xtra startup wear or worse!!!!!
 

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Out of all the winters I hope we have a doozey this year even if it means no riding. We are so hurting for water we need some serious snow pack on our mountain.
Phil,come on up here and bring lots of buckets--we're drowning! Floods and slides all around the region. Looking for bike pontoons and an outboard.
 

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blocking the oil cooler is a good thought, dumping that 20-whatever dino oil is even smarter, the 20 weight's poor startup flow can cause xtra startup wear or worse!!!!!
The engines were designed with a certain oil weight in mind. The 20 weight will do just fine. You would have ride in a lot colder temps for it to make a difference
 
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