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Discussion Starter #1
This afternoon I installed the Victoryonly easy clutch arm. Took all of about 5 minutes. Mostly loosening the clutch cable behind the rear cylinder. What a difference! This is without a doubt the easiest clutch pull I've ever had on a motorcycle! One finger easy. around $50 bucks and it looks good with nice chrome or black finish. Why buy a chrome cover when you can have both for about the same price!!! cheers

http://www.victoryonly.com/ACCESSORIES/easy_clutch.htm
 

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It removes a significant amount of travel in the clutch. Beware of premature clutch failure. (if it were me I would just exercise my grip) and leave the clutch alone. Better to build up some strength in the hand than replace the clutch much sooner than necessary.
 

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I'm curious how this eases the clutch pull besides loosening the cable.
It increases the length of the clutch arm thereby increasing mechanical advantage. Conversely, it requires a longer pull which means the the overall rotation of the clutch arm is decreased when the clutch lever is pulled in. Some people have found that adjusting the clutch very becomes difficult after installing one of these as the line between too tight and too loose becomes very fine.
 

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It increases the length of the clutch arm thereby increasing mechanical advantage. Conversely, it requires a longer pull which means the the overall rotation of the clutch arm is decreased when the clutch lever is pulled in. Some people have found that adjusting the clutch very becomes difficult after installing one of these as the line between too tight and too loose becomes very fine.
My clutch pull is far heavier than normal
 

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I too heard that these arms decrease the amount of clutch pull thereby not completely disengaging the clutch leading to premature clutch failure .... This isn't an issue for me as I have big strong man-hands .:D
 

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i had one ordered before i got my bike and had the dealer
put it on. this is the first bike that i've not adjusted my own
clutch. service tech is also part owner. has been working on
vics from the start. he never indicated anything bad would
happen. im not hard on the clutch and have 14000 trouble free
miles on mine. its also a victory only product.
 

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Moto , check your cable , it mat be binding causing a harder then normal pull ....
No mate, its free as a bird, had the cable disconnected at both ends a few times now, to lube the cable ends, (every time I change the oil) and there's no perceptible drag on the cable....it's inside the clutch somewhere.
The Judge I test rode 600 miles had a real light clutch...the ones on the showroom floor at Victory in Brisbane that I've sat on and pulled the clutch on too....actually I don't see why anyone would need to lighten a Victory clutch anyway!..theyre light as a feather anyway
Except for mine!
my old Yam XS 650 had a very heavy clutch too so Im used to it, but starting to get a bit of arthritis in my hands and it certainly don't help.
 

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Does it work ok , I guess that is the most important thing ...
 

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I too heard that these arms decrease the amount of clutch pull thereby not completely disengaging the clutch leading to premature clutch failure .... This isn't an issue for me as I have big strong man-hands .:D
disengaging or engaging?
In my way of thinking when the lever is all the way out the clutch is 'engaged', locked solid, and the bikes moving (if in gear)
disengaged the lever is in close to the handlebar and the clutch mechanism is 'disengaged', freewheeling and not driving the bike.

so wouldn't not completely disengaging result in gear clash as opposed to slipping?
 

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Does it work ok , I guess that is the most important thing ...
Yeah it works ok..dont slip when fully engaged ..and dont clash gears, well not any more than the normal clunk into first or clunk on the upshift into second.
Its just my hand gets a real workout when I fully pull the lever all the way in to the bars, at a rest.
I never or rarely sit at traffic lights in neutral, (and with increased txting and facebooking of car drivers, Im watching my mirrors ready for a distracted txting driver to try and take me out)
Changing up is ok as I tend to preload slightly and just lightly fan the clutch on upshifts.
Changing down I'm going almost all the way in and matching my revs too for a slicker shift.
I tend to accept the things I cannot change, but if theres a way of changing it to lighten it up then I'm all ears:)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It' works perfectly for those that know how to adjust a clutch. Adjusted correctly putting the bike is first gear brings no lurch or grinding and the bike just sits there. Once the lever is 1/2 inch away from the grip the bike starts moving and by the time it's 3/4 the way out it is fully engaged. There is still a 1/4" free play when the lever is fully out so I know it's not too tight.

Nice wide engagement zone. It has nothing to do with my hand strength. Living in Southern California we can get stuck in stop & go traffic and this will be much nicer for those times. Plus I'm not paying a fortune for just a cosmetic chrome cover. cheers
 

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I hate to be negative here, but I will be on this one. I had heard about how hard it is to keep the clutch properly adjusted once an easy-pull had been installed. I had an easy clutch installed by the dealer I go to when I bought my bike. I also had installed synthetic oil at my 15K oil change - Dealer's mechanic said that they have had no issues with synthetic oil in a Victory. On a 700 mile trip, I got stuck in bumper to bumper traffic for over an hour in 80 degree temperatures. My clutch started slipping so bad that I couldn't keep the bike going. I was a 160 miles from the dealer that I go to and called them to send a trailer for me. Their mechanic talked me through a clutch adjustment after letting the bike cool a bit. The dealer pulled apart my clutch and found it fried. I now have a new Barnett clutch and Victory oil installed. The dealer pulled every easy-pull off the shelf and won't install them nor will they install synthetic oil in a Victory. I didn't question the bill (dealer did take care of me) because ultimately, it was my decision to install an easy-pull and put in synthetic oil. - Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #16
.

so wouldn't not completely disengaging result in gear clash as opposed to slipping?
These bikes gears run synchronized so you can shift without the clutch if the road speed/ rpms are close if you wanted to.
 

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These bikes gears run synchronized so you can shift without the clutch if the road speed/ rpms are close if you wanted to.
What's this got to do with premature clutch failure?
You've taken one line of my post out of context.
 

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I had one on my 08 kingpin for years. I have the same on my XCT. I pulled it off my 08 when I sold it. It fit right on my 2013 Xct, go figure i pulled it off to sale and just tried and it fits.. Love it. I like the different travel points on the clutch lever in my hand example---from where lever totally squeezed, clutch disengaged. --to--the point where clutch starts to engage as I release the lever. When I release my clutch lever my clutch is TOTALLY engaged. The easy clutch doesn't cause clutch to slip.improperly adjusted clutch.(cable to tight,no slack in lever) DOES. Yes it changes engagement timing in which clutch's come together but so minute it is insignificant. There is a slight new learning curve in your left hand kinda like first jumping on a different bike and learning the clutch. pull is nice and smooth yet telling.If I pop my clutch to burn a little rubber it is instant explosion of power with asphalt screaming. This is sa great cheap mod besides 1/4 throttle ring.

And I will add synthetics 100% will cause your clutch to slip IT did in mine, I got rid of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What's this got to do with premature clutch failure?
You've taken one line of my post out of context.
No, what you've done is lay out a false premise that a longer clutch actuation arm is bad for the clutch. False. If one doesn't have the mechanical know how to adjust the clutch correctly with a longer arm then just move along and let the rest of us who know how to adjust the clutch enjoy the lighter pull. Simple enough.. thumb up
 

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So, you get mechanical advantage from this gizmo. Adjusted correctly it's arc of travel allows for full clutch engagement and full clutch disengagement. It's a lever. You put a lever under a rock and put a smaller stone under the lever for a fulcrum. grab the lever close to the fulcrum and push down. You may move the rock but you work harder to do it the closer your hand is to the fulcrum. All things being the same you move your grip away from the fulcrum and push and it more easily dislodges the rock the further away you move your hand. The penalty for ease of movement is more travel. Nothing is free. As long as you can dislodge the rock within the range of movement of the lever it makes sense to pay the penalty of travel to mitigate the cost of hard work.

If the above is true then issues related to failure are due to other conditions. It doesn't matter if the pinion shaft is being engaged by an increased pressure due to the longer throw of the gizmo. As long as it engages within it's adjustment parameters there is no reason for it to shorten the clutch life. Does using a hydraulic clutch shorten clutch life? One is mechanical advantage and the other hydraulic advantage. The end result, just like the stock set up, is the same, move the plates. The relief it offers your clutch hand it also offers your clutch cable, at least torsion relief. It will require greater travel but that's a benefit too since a less concentrated area is in friction.

I like the idea that you get a finished item that also provides mechanical advantage. Not just another pretty face.

Sold American.
 
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