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Does victory make a kit for this,I am looking for something to change the pull to real easy.After riding for a while my hand hurts to much.Any help I would be thankful
 

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Does victory make a kit for this,I am looking for something to change the pull to real easy.After riding for a while my hand hurts to much.Any help I would be thankful
I just put an easy clutch from victoryonly.com on my XC today.
 

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how did you make out with this?I'm guessing your hand was hurting also..
Nah, my hand was fine. I put 1300 miles on last weekend, too. I just wanted to get a cover for the clutch because it's ugly, and I met a guy in NY who had one. It looked nice and worked great, so I got it.

It certainly makes the clutch pull easy and smooth.
 

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Victory does make an easy pull and the same one fits most Victory models so most dealerships carry them. The downside with these is that they have been known to accelerate clutch cablewear. If you do install one make sure to be careful adjusting your cable after install because if you get it off a little (too tight/too loose) your clutch can drag or slip.
 

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i have one on my cross roads from victoryonly.com. had it
put on before the bike came home. even the owner of
the dealership couldnt believe what a difference it made. he
ordered a couple for stock.also covers the lever with nice chrome.
 

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Here's the link if anyone else is curious about them.

http://www.victoryonly.com/ACCESSORIES/easy_clutch_powder.htm

Just gotta reiterate what was said about the adjustment. If you must err; err on the side of being too loose with the cable. Otherwise you could go through an expensive set of clutch plates.
 

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I am going to add my 2 cents since that is what forums are about:D

I had a similar product on my VTX 1300, that bike had a stiff clutch pull also. When I got the Vic finding a clutch pull reducer was high on my list. I found the one everybody is talking about at Victoryonly. But then I found some other posts and articles that got me thinking.

After reading the articles I felt very embarrassed since I am a electrical/mechanical engineer by day. I should have known what was happening.

Like mentioned above, you are risking premature clutch wear. It is my opinion now that it is not a Risk but a guarantee.

To put the operation in very simple terms: When you pull in on your clutch lever you pull the cable that is attached to the clutch arm, which "rotates" to disengage the clutch. You only have a finite distance you can pull the clutch lever, which relates to a specific amount linear movement of the cable which translates to a specific amount of rotation on the clutch arm at the shaft. The way the tension reducers work is to "increase" the leverage by lengthening the arm on the clutch arm. Here is the problem, by lengthening the arm enough to get a benefit in "felt" tension reduction, you need to pull the cable further to get the same amount of rotation out of the arm at the shaft. The problem is you have no way of increasing that length of pull!! So the result is either (A) you don't fully disengage the clutch when you pull the lever, thus the plates are still rubbing, or even worse (B) you don't let them fully engage when the lever is released. Either way will cause premature wear of the clutch plates which is a bad thing.

The clutch on my VTX was starting to slip, not major but I thought it odd after only 30K and I am not an aggressive rider:crzy: But after I found the threads and articles about these tension reducers it all made sense.

You can take what I say with a grain of salt, that's cool, you can do your own research, thats better, but if you think about what I described above it should make sense that these tension reducers are not a good thing. You are better off to exercise your hand and build strength or if you have $$ to spend, upgrade to a hydraulic clutch.

Think about it, if there was a way to reduce the tension, the engineers designing the system would have done it, or there would be a true OEM accessory for it so Ma Vic could profit.

I am not trying to rain on anybodies parade, I just want to put some information out there to help my fellow riders out there stay riding. 99% of us bought our Vics to ride, not to work on themcheers
 

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Before you install the new clutch cover and you marked the shaft along with the housing that the shaft passes through, then, pull the clutch lever in and mark the housing where to line up with the mark on the shaft it would tell you the amount of degrees the shaft rotated. So, if you install the new clutch cover and adjust it so the rotated the same amount then there would be no fear of ruining the plates. This fulcrum effect makes the clutch easier to pull with the same rotation of the shaft.

Jim
 

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What Lazydawg is saying makes sense... However i bought one before i had knew Vic had clutch covers and before i saw lazydogs observation. I only bought it to cover up the fugliest part of the bike, I do like it, but have thought about going to just a cover to alleviate any problems down the road
 

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Point well taken, but.....

LazyDawg makes a very good point and made me start to re-think the ez-clutch pull component.

One thing the Dealer did when they installed this was they did not re-check the .5mm - 1.5mm clutch lever gap in front of its pivot point. This was of course a mistake as this could cause the clutch to NOT to fully engage.

I checked this as soon as I drove off and corrected it, still need to mention this to the Dealer because even though I was there within 1 1/2 hours to pick it up as soon as it was delivered this should have been caught by them and corrected IMHO.

So LazyDawg's post started me thinking about the pull which he is correct in stating that the pull cannot be increased and therefore you may not be fully disengaging the clutch plates causing premature wear also.

So.... this is what I did, I went back to stock setup and re-adjusted the clutch cable to spec, approx .5mm prior to movement of clutch arm.

I then measured from the lower cable aluminum mounting plate straight out to the cable where the cable's sleeve ends. I pulled the clutch lever and measured the travel, it was 1/2" from full engagement to full disengagement.

I reinstalled the ez-clutch component, (I noticed there was a little side to side play prior to tightening down the mounting bolt so I removed the side to side play by simply moving the ez-clutch component to the same side it is pulled to, that way after it is tightened if it would vibrate a little loose, the same point of adjustment would not be altered since there is tension in that same direction....even though I seriously doubt it would vibrate loose as it's a decent size bolt), readjusted the clutch cable to approx. .5mm gap and again measured the total travel distance.

As best as I could tell this was 1/2" the same amount as with the stock setup.

Yes, I do understand arc length and the further out on a radius it will have to travel further to rotate the clutch arm the same distance which is probably what LazyDawg was thinking, however this would only apply if the new setup point fell on that angled line where the clutch is fully engaged.

Since the travel measured the same then it can't fall on that same line or it would have measured a shorter travel and LazyDawg would be correct in his statement and the clutch would not fully dis-engage.

I'm not try to put LazyDawg down for his thought process was a excellent one and this is why I wanted to prove to myself one way or the other if I was in fact getting a fully disengaged clutch....now I'm confident that I am.

On the stock setup I simply used a folding rule and measured from the bottom of said rule and with the new setup I simply measured from the top of ruler keeping the end of the ruler seated flush against the lower cable aluminum mount and both times eyeballed the reading with my glasses on to the best of my ability.

I wanted to add this to help anyone get a better picture of how I did this, not real scientific but it's close enough for what I was trying to achieve.

It actually appeared to disengage maybe even 1/16 more than 1/2" but I just went with good enough.

Just my .02¢, Hope this helps anyone out there considering using this component. Dont take my word for it, you can easily check it out for yourself.

Ride safe!
 

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No offense taken on my part Sixcheers

I have a slight suggestion to your measurement. First let me say I would be more than happy to do the test and measurements but I don't have access to the easy pull attachment.

Here is a measurement suggestion;
on the actual shaft, place a mark. Engage the clutch fully and mark the case at the point the mark on the shaft stops. Then either add or remove the easy pull and re measure. What answers the question is the actual amount of shaft rotation, since we can't actually see and measure the clutch plate movement.

I don't knock anyone who questions something they hear or read, I applaud it. As I stated in my original post my intent is not to rain on anyone's parade. Also during my research I came across a documented case of premature clutch wear that Ma Vic attributed to the easy pull modification. I understand that depending on how the whole system is adjusted will have an affect, but simple physics states that to achieve the same amount of rotation from an extended lever, more travel of the lever is required.

I have attached a simple picture to illustrate. The round body is the shaft, the arm has 2 holes, let's say hole A is the stock position and hole B is the easy pull attachment. To rotate the shaft/arm 45 degrees would require a pull of .57 inches in the stock position. To get the same 45 degree rotation from the extended arm (leverage) you would need to pull the arm almost a full inch (.96"). These are not numbers from our actual clutch arm, just picked some length to make the point. Which takes me back to my point, we cannot increase the amount of pull length in our clutch setup, something has to give and travel is what gives on these clutch arm extensions.

Please don't take this as argumentative, and I am confident that if you take the measurement at the shaft rotation as I suggested you will see a reduction of rotation using the arm extender. Also since there has been at least one documented case with the Vics and I personally know of a few cases in the Honda VTX line (with a similar mod option) of premature clutch wear when using these devices, I stand that In My Humble Opinion, these devices will cause premature wear of the clutch. That said, if you must have a lighter feeling clutch then by all means, install it, just realize you will be replacing the clutch sooner than normal, it is not a catastrophic failure are risking, just spending some $$ sooner than others mightthumb up
 

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No offense taken on my part Sixcheers

I have a slight suggestion to your measurement. First let me say I would be more than happy to do the test and measurements but I don't have access to the easy pull attachment.

Here is a measurement suggestion;
on the actual shaft, place a mark. Engage the clutch fully and mark the case at the point the mark on the shaft stops. Then either add or remove the easy pull and re measure. What answers the question is the actual amount of shaft rotation, since we can't actually see and measure the clutch plate movement.

I don't knock anyone who questions something they hear or read, I applaud it. As I stated in my original post my intent is not to rain on anyone's parade. Also during my research I came across a documented case of premature clutch wear that Ma Vic attributed to the easy pull modification. I understand that depending on how the whole system is adjusted will have an affect, but simple physics states that to achieve the same amount of rotation from an extended lever, more travel of the lever is required.

I have attached a simple picture to illustrate. The round body is the shaft, the arm has 2 holes, let's say hole A is the stock position and hole B is the easy pull attachment. To rotate the shaft/arm 45 degrees would require a pull of .57 inches in the stock position. To get the same 45 degree rotation from the extended arm (leverage) you would need to pull the arm almost a full inch (.96"). These are not numbers from our actual clutch arm, just picked some length to make the point. Which takes me back to my point, we cannot increase the amount of pull length in our clutch setup, something has to give and travel is what gives on these clutch arm extensions.

Please don't take this as argumentative, and I am confident that if you take the measurement at the shaft rotation as I suggested you will see a reduction of rotation using the arm extender. Also since there has been at least one documented case with the Vics and I personally know of a few cases in the Honda VTX line (with a similar mod option) of premature clutch wear when using these devices, I stand that In My Humble Opinion, these devices will cause premature wear of the clutch. That said, if you must have a lighter feeling clutch then by all means, install it, just realize you will be replacing the clutch sooner than normal, it is not a catastrophic failure are risking, just spending some $$ sooner than others mightthumb up

I understand completely, as I used trig for over twenty four years as a certified quality technician and understand what your saying:

Here is a measurement suggestion;
on the actual shaft, place a mark. Engage the clutch fully and mark the case at the point the mark on the shaft stops. Then either add or remove the easy pull and re measure. What answers the question is the actual amount of shaft rotation, since we can't actually see and measure the clutch plate movement.

I don't knock anyone who questions something they hear or read, I applaud it. As I stated in my original post my intent is not to rain on anyone's parade. Also during my research I came across a documented case of premature clutch wear that Ma Vic attributed to the easy pull modification. I understand that depending on how the whole system is adjusted will have an affect, but simple physics states that to achieve the same amount of rotation from an extended lever, more travel of the lever is required.
But that was part of my communication which was that if a line through point A and point B do not fall on the same line as the center line of the arm, (point B could be offset, no?), then the amount of pull required to rotate the arm would not be increased. Arc length would be reduced....perhaps to the same amount of rotation as original.

I will inspect part closer to see if center line of cable holder is offset closer towards the clutch adjustment than the centerline of the ez-clutch component mount.

Normally it would be increased so length of pull would have to also be increased to reach the same amount of rotation, hence your thought.... well taken.

What answers the question is the actual amount of shaft rotation, since we can't actually see and measure the clutch plate movement.
I couldn't agree more.

I was thinking about measuring rotation, and should have done so but was in a hurry that day, however, since this is the real test I'll re-measure rotation and report back.

I do understand completely waht you are explaining and appreciate your drawing, I done this many times myself in the past.

Again, thanks for the feedback as it's been a while, about eleven years since I've been a Quality Technician, so I should have gone with my instinct to A inspect part better for offset hole and B measure rotation.

I'm on it!
 

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No offense taken on my part Sixcheers

I have a slight suggestion to your measurement. First let me say I would be more than happy to do the test and measurements but I don't have access to the easy pull attachment.

Here is a measurement suggestion;
on the actual shaft, place a mark. Engage the clutch fully and mark the case at the point the mark on the shaft stops. Then either add or remove the easy pull and re measure. What answers the question is the actual amount of shaft rotation, since we can't actually see and measure the clutch plate movement.

I don't knock anyone who questions something they hear or read, I applaud it. As I stated in my original post my intent is not to rain on anyone's parade. Also during my research I came across a documented case of premature clutch wear that Ma Vic attributed to the easy pull modification. I understand that depending on how the whole system is adjusted will have an affect, but simple physics states that to achieve the same amount of rotation from an extended lever, more travel of the lever is required.

I have attached a simple picture to illustrate. The round body is the shaft, the arm has 2 holes, let's say hole A is the stock position and hole B is the easy pull attachment. To rotate the shaft/arm 45 degrees would require a pull of .57 inches in the stock position. To get the same 45 degree rotation from the extended arm (leverage) you would need to pull the arm almost a full inch (.96"). These are not numbers from our actual clutch arm, just picked some length to make the point. Which takes me back to my point, we cannot increase the amount of pull length in our clutch setup, something has to give and travel is what gives on these clutch arm extensions.

Please don't take this as argumentative, and I am confident that if you take the measurement at the shaft rotation as I suggested you will see a reduction of rotation using the arm extender. Also since there has been at least one documented case with the Vics and I personally know of a few cases in the Honda VTX line (with a similar mod option) of premature clutch wear when using these devices, I stand that In My Humble Opinion, these devices will cause premature wear of the clutch. That said, if you must have a lighter feeling clutch then by all means, install it, just realize you will be replacing the clutch sooner than normal, it is not a catastrophic failure are risking, just spending some $$ sooner than others mightthumb up
I did as you mentioned about marking clutch arm's shaft and the case fully engaging and fully disengaging the clutch lever with the stock set-up and the ez-clutch assist component.

I tried my best to make the slack adjustment in the clutch lever to be as close to the same on both set-ups as humanly possible using a feeler gage setting in both instances to where you could barely see the the clutch arm move as the feeler gage was set in the groove between the clutch lever and its mount, (on top where there is a slight gap to start with). Also I made sure that in both set-ups that the clutch arm was fully engaged.

This had to be done due to having to adjust the clutch cable for the different set-ups.

Here is a picture of the ez-clutch assist I'm talking about as I've seen that there are many out there and not all are made the same.

ez-clutch.jpg

As you can see the hole is offset which does help reduce the amount of travel it would have to make up if Point B had fallen on the same plane as Point A and the clutch arm centerline.

However, the clutch arm did rotate slightly past the marked point for the ez-clutch assist, about a dots worth of a medium pointed black sharpie, how’s that for scientific, LOL!

I would roughly guess that it was about 2° - 5° max, this is just a guess.

I went ahead and decided to use this set-up as I cant see this making the difference between the plates being still engaged somewhat or completely disengaged when the clutch lever is pulled in all the way. However, I've been wrong before so.......it's possible.

Yes there is a difference but to me knowing what tolerances is that is not much of a difference in my book. I could see if Point B and Point A did fall on the same plane as the centerline of the clutch arm that would then be quite a different story.

Sorry for not taking pictures of the difference in line up but visually to me anyways it was minimal.

Anyway I'm staying with it due to my findings and suggest anyone wanting to use this to use their own best judgment.

One more thing, on final set up I used approximately .5mm, (.020) gap before I could visually see the clutch arm move, the slightest movement by feel of the clutch lever to get the maximum rotation when the clutch lever is disengaged.

It's easier to due than it seems, just adjust clutch cable until there is no play and clutch arm moves as you just barely pull on clutch lever, then back off a few turns until you get the slightest of clutch lever pull with no visual clutch arm movement then tighten jam nut. Re-check...done.

I'm confident that even if there is some pre-mature wear it would be very slight IMHO, YMMV!

I think that a lot of problems may be the mistake that my Dealer made and maybe other individuals may make is to install this ez-clutch assist component and not check their cable adjustment. My Dealer had it set to where the clutch arm was not fully engaging...NOT good and as you mentioned the worse case senario, so that's the first thing I checked and corrected.

Pdf Instructions from VictoryOnly.com

Six over and out!

Thanks again LazyDawg.
 

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Hotvic.com has an easy clutch that's a different design for $59.99...FWIW.
 
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