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Discussion Starter #1
I almost dont want to ask because if my Zero knowledge about the Victory ECM but I am after a specific characteristic esp seeing some talk about Exh Popping and made worse with tri ovals.

I have a great amount of knowledge about the Buell ECM thanks to ECM SPY. When a Buell runs like **** due to a bad O2, Throttle Position or other sensor, the ECM learns to run bad. After a few minutes at a steady 60mph the ECM can select a different map to run on in range. Its also important to take note of the AFV Air fuel value and best to Zero it if doing major work. Riding the bike at a steady 60mph will reset the ECM " Learn it " to run with the new sensors or adjustments. Not sure what moves the AFV on a Vic.

So. Can anyone hear tell me the on the fly adjustment this Victory ECM uses if any? What is the procedure? Does a procedure exist? I see riding unplugging or plugging o2 sensors and then plugging them back in expecting less exh popping. All of this would be very very foolish on a Buell without getting into the ECM and adjusting. WTH? I asked.
 

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Your 2016 might be different but prior to that year the Victory ECM wasn't that smart. In fact it's old tech going back to the early 1980's. I know this doesn't answer your question but did want to add it to the mix. I can only guess but I think they went with the older design because they were reliable. You don't hear about Victory ECM's crashing very often.

Maybe @NOEMTZ will see this and comment.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I am not that fool. I would rather run wide bands than a plug. If I had to.

I don't want to plug or mess around with my O2 sensors. I just noticed other riders were and some doing it maybe to just chase exh popping which as far as I know... I don't have right now???
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Your 2016 might be different but prior to that year the Victory ECM wasn't that smart. In fact it's old tech going back to the early 1980's. I know this doesn't answer your question but did want to add it to the mix. I can only guess but I think they went with the older design because they were reliable. You don't hear about Victory ECM's crashing very often.

Maybe @NOEMTZ will see this and comment.
That is surprising to hear. Our Victory ECM is running on very old tech? The VDO ECM is very reliable and applies diff mapping based on air temp and other factors. Buell runs hot and if a rider doesnt know what a bad engine temp sensor does or how a throttle temp sensor needs adjusted on occasion the machine turns to **** quit. Some Harley dealers will spew a life span on all Harley sensors like ignition, engine temp, tps, 02 and part of it is COA and maybe coa for a tech that doesnt know how or want to work on a Buell / problem. We might see the same kind of discrimination and contempt for Victorys at Indian dealers. I would expect lots of lip service. :kiss
 

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Information on Victory Vision, Victory Vegas, Victory Kingpin, Victory Hammer, Victory Jackpot, Victory CrossCountry, Victory Cross Roads, Touring Cruiser, Classic Cruiser, Victory Motorcycles

Disconnecting the O2 sensors does not put the engine in "limp home" mode.
Disconnecting the O2 sensors does not make the engine think it's cold and run on enrichening mode.

The factory system is part-time closed loop. When you disconnect the O2 sensors it simply stays in open loop mode (it doesn't lean out at steady cruise). Under acceleration or at full throttle, the loop would be open anyway and the bike runs on a fixed fuel map.

Until recently, fuel controllers like the Power Commander or VFC-III required that the O2 sensors be done away with. Some of the newer controllers use them.

The Narrow-band sensors can only see "on target", "richer than target", or "leaner than target" so the ECU uses them as switches... switching back and forth a couple times a second to hunt for the target air/fuel ratio.

The older Victory bikes had single wire O2s and if you unplugged them the ECU didn't seem to care. 2016 and later bikes will show a check engine light if disconnected (hence the need for eliminators).
 

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16 and newer bikes are now using the wide band O2 sensors for the closed loop system. Major improvement from the old narrow band. The maps on the ECU's were built to try and achieve the AFR ratios at various Manifold Absolute Pressures. To an extent....the ECU does make minor adjustments to the IAV to try and achieve those AFRs. But the AFR tables and Fuel Maps from the factory need improvement in my opinion.

If you are getting extensive popping after some upgrades, I would recommend getting an ECU re-flasher like the Powervision CX or Maximus and have a better fuel map created by a proper tuning process that can be flashed into the ECU.
 

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You may be correct. The sensors and leads look very similar or identical to my wide band kit used when doing the Maximus mobile tuning.
 

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I believe the 2016 4 wire “O2” sensor is the Bosch LSF-4.2 (planar Lambda sensor). Accurate only at stoichiometric value of lambda =1, also referred to as a switching type sensor. 2 wires are for the heating element (that will set a service code if the ECU detects an open circuit).

The Bosch LSU is the wide band O2 sensor that can measure the proportion of oxygen in the exhaust stream. (Generally used in aftermarket kits)


2016 Cross Country Tour, gloss black
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk app
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks for letting us know which one is wide band. It looks like the are cheap enough to buy individually. No one has ever posted a link for a known wide band to install outside of buying a special $600 kit.
 

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Thanks for letting us know which one is wide band. It looks like the are cheap enough to buy individually. No one has ever posted a link for a known wide band to install outside of buying a special $600 kit.
Your ECU will not be able to communicate with wideband O2 sensors.
 

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I believe the 2016 4 wire “O2” sensor is the Bosch LSF (planar Lambda sensor). Accurate only at stoichiometric value of lambda =1, also referred to as a switching type sensor. 2 wires are for the heating element (that will set a service code if the ECU detects an open circuit).

The Bosch LSU 4.2 is the wide band O2 sensor that can measure the proportion of oxygen in the exhaust stream. (Generally used in aftermarket kits)


2016 Cross Country Tour, gloss black
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk app


I need to correct and clarify my last. I believe the 2016 Victory 4 wire Lambda sensor is the an LSF 4.2.
A wide band O2 sensor typically used for a wide band aftermarket kit is a Bosch LSU (there are more than just the 4.2). (Will not directly interface with the stock ECU)


2016 Cross Country Tour, gloss black
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk app
 

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Discussion Starter #16
well that's just sad. the hardware is there missing the small and narrow minded wideband brain. Pretty damn stupid Polaris. how much more would it have take to put the wideband circuit into the ECU so it can be tuned in the performance world. It wouldn't even have to be active, just there to be used if needed. At 32k for Indian you would think this kind of intelligence would be there too. Needed or not. That's my biggest complaint with hd. Poor base models power and performance to start with. In the name of Willie G tradition. no thank you.
 
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