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Discussion Starter #1
For the engine break-in of 0-90 miles...

2012 Owners Manual said:
Do not operate for extended periods of time at throttle positions above
1/3 throttle. Vary the engine speed frequently. Do not operate for
extended periods of time at any one throttle position.
So, how long is an extended period of time?

Thanks,
John
 

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Parts need to expand and contract during break in so the rings can mate properly with the cylinders. That's where that statement comes from. The worst thing you can do is drive like a granny. I believe they are talking about the extreme, i.e. 8 hours at 55mph. I drive a new bike just like one with 50k miles. Never had a problem. Common sense prevails.

Check this out it's a good read.
http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
 

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Do not use the cruise control to break in your new bike. Try running compression and decompression runs in each gear. Choose roads that will make you vary the speed and move the bike through the gears. Don't do your first 500 miles on a 500 mile trip you cruise on the highway at a constant speed.

If all else fails, search the forum - this topic has already been beat to death a few times. ;)
 

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Do not use the cruise control to break in your new bike. Try running compression and decompression runs in each gear. Choose roads that will make you vary the speed and move the bike through the gears. Don't do your first 500 miles on a 500 mile trip you cruise on the highway at a constant speed.

If all else fails, search the forum - this topic has already been beat to death a few times. ;)
Good advice on the varying run cycles... I always run my bikes and trucks hard when they are brand new. I had a mentor early on in life that told me to break in all vehicles how you expect them to be run later on down the road.

I never get bored with rehashing these topics...
 

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Good advice on the varying run cycles... I always run my bikes and trucks hard when they are brand new. I had a mentor early on in life that told me to break in all vehicles how you expect them to be run later on down the road.

I never get bored with rehashing these topics...
yup, ride it like you stole it. If you are going to be going on a long trip just make sure you switch gears to vary the RPMs, although you should be able to get through break-in quickly
 

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In the March issue of CYCLE WORLD magazine, on page 72, the subject is discussed very succinctly in the Service section. +1 on continually vary engine and bike speed / after 100 miles, briefly shoot revs up / never, never lug - keep 'er over 2500 rpm. As the reply in CW states; the manufacturer knows best.
 

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Parts need to expand and contract during break in so the rings can mate properly with the cylinders.
Does not apply to current cylinder ring material technology.
 

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OK. But the answer to the OP's question is still the same. Vary speeds, don't lug and don't redline.
You are absolutely correct.
 

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Does not apply to current cylinder ring material technology.
Do you have a reliable source that could confirm and explain your assertion in some greater depth?

Nevertheless, I agree with the USMC guy. I ride new bikes just like I ride old bikes. If I'm on the highway on a new bike for several miles I might pin the throttle every once in a while, but that's about it.

And even that is probably overkill. A lawnmower is about as old tech as I imagine one could buy and they work for years running at the same engine speed indefinitely.
 

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There are several good articles online covering current ring tech. Check the manufacturers sites first. Same thinking applies to motor break in, where once the philosophy was breaking a motor on Syn was a no-no and now you have cars leaving the assembly line running the stuff. Bottom line materials have changed but 40-60 years of old school thinking linger in the corner of almost every speed shop around.
 

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There are several good articles online covering current ring tech.
Do you have one in mind?


once the philosophy was breaking a motor on Syn was a no-no and now you have cars leaving the assembly line running the stuff.
As did my Ducatis. Still, I'm interested in an article that discounts the need to interface new rings to a fresh cylinder bore due to the materials that either are made from. Now I'm of the opinion that they are going to mate eventually one way or another, but as I understand it, if you want the best seal at high rpms, they need to be mated at those rpms, just not for periods that would overheat the freshly minted materials.

Bottom line materials have changed but 40-60 years of old school thinking linger in the corner of almost every speed shop around.
New alloys or not, I'd think they are still machined parts that have microscopic peaks that need to get worn in before optimum sealing occurs.

Most bikes I've owned didn't change much over the break in period. A notable exception was a Kawi 1200 that got progressively better gas mileage for the first 3k or so miles of its life. It also had a cylinder meltdown at 14k miles. I had it re-plated, new rings etc and the bike lasted me another 16k miles or so with no more issues before I traded it in.
 

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I'll see what I can dig up. There was a great article a few years back that covered most of the new stuff. And I don't mean to imply that there is NO breakin period but to much emphasis is placed on it these days. Yes new materials need that surfacing period but I'm just saying that period is much shorter than what is commonly talked of in threads such as this one.
 

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Thanks, but this article doesn't discount the need for break-in due to new age materials. His problem with the Motoman (old skool?) technique is simply due to long stroke big twins having poor efficiency at high rpms and consequently over baking the engine.

But when I look at the Motoman site it says this:
On a Dyno:
Warm the engine up completely !!

Then, using 4th gear:

Do Three 1/2 Throttle dyno runs from
40% - 60% of your engine's max rpm
Let it Cool Down For About 15 Minutes

Do Three 3/4 Throttle dyno runs from
40% - 80% of your engine's max rpm
Let it Cool Down For About 15 Minutes

Do Three Full Throttle dyno runs from
30% - 100% of your engine's max rpm
Let it Cool Down For About 15 Minutes
Go For It !!

No where do I see Motoman instructing anyone to dwell at these high rpms. And Lloyd himself admits that all these bikes are run to redline at the factory at least once before they leave, so apparently they are capable of doing that without self destructing.

Anyway, here's what Lloyd goes on to say:

I'll make five to six 4th-5th gear runs while my cooling fans are on, allowing the motor to come down under it's own power after every run and viewing the power after each run. The motor may feel hot when you first do this but we want to make sure and it should feel to the touch very hot when you rest your hand on the cylinder. I'll only run the first few up to the 3800-4000 rpm range but that's usually enough to see the difference in how the motor is acting and seating in. Usually the motor at this point on the dyno is maxing the power and we normally won't see the power levels raise any higher under the same hot condition. The air fuel from the first pull on should be checked and adjusted to the proper ratio to avoid other issues related to an overly lean or rich condition. I'll normally let the motor cool under the fans for a 10-15 minute time while checking for oil leaks and recording the cylinder and head temps for our database. After the cool down, I fire it up for another warm up period and back to building the fuel map. While building the fuel map I'll start at the lower rpms first and then progressively move up to the higher rpms but not until I feel the bike has hard enough run time on it, usually 25-30 minutes.

Sounds pretty similar to Motoman to me, other than Lloyd has his bikes better instrumented.

Anyway, one thing both mention is no wringing out the throttle with no load on a cold engine. I've seen so many Harley types do this and it makes me cringe every time.

Since Victory is trying so hard to emulate the Harleys, it makes me concerned. When I bought my bike I had them put the Stage 1 kit on it. When I went to pick it up the salesman said that they were on and sound really good and then he asked me if I wanted to hear it as he proceeded to turned on the engine. I told him "sure, but don't you touch that throttle."

Of course who knows how giddy these guys get when they get to put on a louder exhaust by themselves?
 

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Just to clarify some, my intent was not to negate the 'need' for motor break-in, only to point out that a lot of emphasis is placed on seating piston rings to cylinder walls. This was once a big issue with cast iron as the material of choice. I break-in every new motor I purchase, I just don't feel the necessity to go hundreds and huindreds of miles to do so, nor do I feel it is critical to go that far before a switch to a full synthetic oil is made. But like oil threads, the opinions on motor break-in are wide and varied.
 

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You can bet each bike is run tested coming out of the factory and I can imagine when they put them through the gears its not an easy row. If the factory is willing to put the beans to her brand spanking new I am not sure how we can hurt them straying from the break in recommendations a bit.
 

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RPMs-vs-MPH

I have been following the owners manual religously, and also the recomendation from the dealer. I was told not to get her above 60 mph, or 300 rpms in the first 500 miles. Everyone I talk to says the mphs are not as important as the RPMs? I'm at 400 and some change.
 
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