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Have a 2013 XC and I am getting a heavy residue of dust from the rear pads all over the bike, bags wife lol. has anyone run into this before and does anyone have a rear pad that is decent and not so soiling? Thanks
 

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This is the first comment about brake dust. How does the surface of the disc appear to be? If its kinda rough, that needs to be addressed. If its smooth, replace the pads. Many, including myself, have found EBC HH pads to be superior to the originals.
 

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I LOVE (absolutely LOVE) my 2012 XCT, however it is the SOOTIEST and dirtiest bike I have ever owned...and while White looks fantastic clean...this bike gets SOOTY and DIRTY within a mile after leaving this house.

I am running EBC pads on the front and rear.
 

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Possible answer posted in your introductory thread.
 

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I ran the EBC Organic pads on the back of my Kingpin and got tons of brake dust. The pads also didn't last very long at all. I went back to the Victory pads and the brake dust went away. I think the answer is in the type of pads. These don't grip as well, but now I just hit them a little harder.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is the first comment about brake dust. How does the surface of the disc appear to be? If its kinda rough, that needs to be addressed. If its smooth, replace the pads. Many, including myself, have found EBC HH pads to be superior to the originals.
The rotor is in good shape, no heavy wear as this bike has just over 1100 miles on it. very sooty though. i purposely lay off the rear brake because it is brutal with the soot. I will check out the hh ebc's and see if it helps. was also wondering if it may be a bit of the belt wearing in as well?
 

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You should be getting nothing off your belt. If you are, do not pass GO--go directly to your dealer and have it adjusted correctly.
Rear brake should nbot get much use anyway, other than fast deceleration, trail braking around tight curves and hill holding.
 

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I didn't think the dust was that till I got my new 23" wheel. It shows the dust much worse than the stock wheel. I am thinking I will be getting new pads WAAAYYY before they need replaced. The dust bugs me a bit, but the lack of initial bite is quite worrisome. I had a similar problem on my HD, but I fixed it with Lyndall Racing Z-Plus pads. I plan to do the same with my Vic (much sooner than later). Great reduction in dust, and night and day difference in bite. One thing my HD does better than my XC.....
 

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Racing pads take longer to warm up and aren't as effective until they do. Street pads do their thing immediately. Many here are very satisfied their choice of EBC HH pads. I have them only on the front as I don't want the rear locking up under heavy braking while riding solo.
 

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The Z-plus aren't "racing" pads. The name of the company is Lyndall Racing.
Here is from their description
A matrix of carbon/Kevlar and non-ferrous metal similar to L.R.B. Gold Plus Pads in stopping performance, but softened slightly to provide longer service life in the lower temperature ranges found in common street use
 

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Thanks for that clarification luv.
 

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Are you guys sure it's brake pad dust? I have soot but it's from the exhaust as I'm running too rich, either that or Victory's produce excessive soot.
 

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im with arkiebiker. my vtx never seemed to attract dust and
dirt. i dont know if all baggers do this but mine sucks up dirt
in the rear like a hoover. maybe its not brake on it dust. your
bike sucks! literally. as anal as i am this is the one thing i hate.
you cant keep it clean in the back for more than a few miles.
good thing the bags cover the back wheel. other than bugs, the
front stays great. guess it gives me something to do after or
before every ride.
i have about 15000 miles on my bike and the rear pads look
great yet. i would assume the original poster check and see if it
isnt just dust and dirt. only my observation and not expert opinion.
--:D

add on comment. seeings im not an aggressive rider and use the
gears a lot to slow down instead of a lot of braking, maybe thats
why i dont see brake dust
 

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2014 CrossRoads and the dust/dirt drives me crazy on the rear bags and fender... Not aggressive on the rear brake either but still get a lot of dust after a few minutes on clean and dry asphalt runs...

Oh well, when I'm cleaning I'm looking so that is one benefit...:cool:
 

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Brake dust? Yea, some of it. Mostly road grime. It goes everywhere, and not sure there would be a way to stop it. The belt seems to grind it up and send it to the cockpit. The left side isn't much cleaner.

It is a mess but you are looking at the wrong culprit. Not sure any one thing does it, but the combination works very well. :ltr:

Cheers
 

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Rear brake should nbot get much use anyway, other than fast deceleration, trail braking around tight curves and hill holding.
Sorry for the tangent but this drives me a little nuts. Trail braking is NOT using the rear brake mid corner. It has nothing at all to do with using the rear brake. You CAN use the rear brake in a lot of cases to stabilize the bike but this is not referred to as trail braking.

Trail braking refers to the technique of adding lean angle while reducing braking with the front brake.

Come off a straight, apply the brakes, continue holding the front brake as you begin to tip in the bike, trail off the front brake as more and more lean angle is added until at max lean you are no longer applying the brakes at all (this should occur at or just before the apex of the turn). That's trail braking. The purpose of it is maximize speed through a turn. Rather than setting your corner speed, then turning, then accelerating, you carry more speed, bleed it off all the way into the apex where you are immediately applying throttle again. The minimum speed during the corner is the same but you are at that speed for only a brief time while you transition from brakes to throttle rather than setting that speed at the start of the turn and holding it all the way through. It's primarily a technique used for racing purposes but it can also be used on the road if you realize too late that a turn is sharper than you thought.

Rant not directed at you Ric, just a personal pet peeve against misinformation.
 

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My bad for call something else "trail Braking." So what does one call it when the rear brake is applied lightly in a curve in order to stabilize the bike?
 

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So what does one call it when the rear brake is applied lightly in a curve in order to stabilize the bike?
Braking! :D

________________

I also see lots of dust on rear wheel. This means it is working. I don't fret it but if it bothers someone, go with Vics oem brakes. I've used EBC's and they are good pads. You can hear them when you apply them which I don't care for.

I am very conservative on braking. Once had a mazda truck that I kept for 12 years. Never got new brakes. cheers still had the same tires too! no im not kidding :)
 

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In a emergency situation you apply rear break first it will put you in a slide or you lock it up and will crash.
Front break first then rear break.
 
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