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Discussion Starter #1
Bikes are coming with more and more electronically controlled features. Some like ABS, I think are fantastic. Others like a half dozen traction modes, I think are overkill. Why make a bike so powerful that you have to electronically limit the power so that the tires will hook up anyway?

Anyway, while I was out running around WV last weekend, I chased down a ZX-14 and we had a long, spirited ride through about 40 miles of twisties together.

So as it happens, I took a bunch of old MC magazines I wanted to read and toss and one of them had a review of the ZX-14. After following one around for a bit I thought it worth reviewing with an after ride beverage or three. Well, of course it is a wonderful, powerful sport-tourer, but what I found interesting was that it could be switched into a "lean" mode.

This hit me as one of those "duh, why didn't I think of that" features. If you've ever been out in no man's land with the gas gauge quickly approaching "E", being able to set the bike to run as efficiently as possible would really be useful feature. And to make it so with the press of a button, on the fly, is the way it should work.

Problem is, most bikes (especially big twins) come really lean out of the box. I guess it would be up to an aftermarket device to permit switching between a FI power mode map and FI gas sipper mode map.
 

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The power commander v allows you to use two different maps and switch between them with a simple two position switch.


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I worry that all the new electronic gadgetry is just more stuff to fail. Stuff that is not user servicable either.

Look at the Diavel. Driving modes, traction control.... kinda takes the 'hooligan' out of a 'hooligan bike', doesn't it?
 

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Coming off a ZX-10R I can tell you that some of those electronics like the traction systems you mentioned make the bike much more user friendly, and easier to manage when your trying to put down 165hp in a bike that weighs almost 300lbs less. Trust me leaned over deep in a corner or downshifting into a tight hairpin things like a slipper clutch and a computer that will control wheel spin are your friend and you use them. Its just the way of the future especially for sport bikes. I would like to have had a chance with the power features. I cant tell you how many times I would of loved to limited the power the bike was putting out on a small tight track so I could of been more aggressive.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Coming off a ZX-10R I can tell you that some of those electronics like the traction systems you mentioned make the bike much more user friendly, and easier to manage when your trying to put down 165hp in a bike that weighs almost 300lbs less. Trust me leaned over deep in a corner or downshifting into a tight hairpin things like a slipper clutch and a computer that will control wheel spin are your friend and you use them. Its just the way of the future especially for sport bikes. I would like to have had a chance with the power features. I cant tell you how many times I would of loved to limited the power the bike was putting out on a small tight track so I could of been more aggressive.
So why pay extra for such a monster engine? You can stomp on a 600 at the apex and it will still hit 160 or better. I'm with HC, not because I worry about electronic failures as much as I think the bike should respond to my inputs...except when I screw up braking. Then I want ABS to save my bacon.:D
 

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What if I want to lock a wheel or steer with the throttle/drift?

Electronic solutions to a personnel problem.

The Hammer out-stopped the Diavel in one test WITHOUT ABS. Imagine that...



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So why pay extra for such a monster engine?
For the drivability and torque. 600s are busy at speed and rangy-bangy with narrower powerbands. The joy of a liter bike is easy to see day to day.



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For the drivability and torque. 600s are busy at speed and rangy-bangy with narrower powerbands. The joy of a liter bike is easy to see day to day.



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Not quite a liter bike but my toy is an 03 Honda 919. Not one single unnecessary gauge. Turns 11.03 easily on regular gas. Gets 50 mpg and will canyon run with the best of them ( talking about average riders like myself). great low and mid range, not so great way up in high revs.
Perfect second bike for short rides in my very hilly twisty county. Longer rides are for the 11 Xc.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
For the drivability and torque. 600s are busy at speed and rangy-bangy with narrower powerbands. The joy of a liter bike is easy to see day to day.
Yeah, but we're talking about canyon strafing crotch rockets here. I've got a big honking inline and I can get on it hard coming out of corners and it has yet to put me on my ass. And it has zero traction control. As the other fella said, this TC business is more the domain of feather weight bikes with rocket engines. If I needed a bike like that, I'd rather have a real featherweight with an engine that doesn't have to be electronically limited to save me from myself. I'd use the savings for tires and beer.
 

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Not quite a liter bike but my toy is an 03 Honda 919. Not one single unnecessary gauge. Turns 11.03 easily on regular gas. Gets 50 mpg and will canyon run with the best of them ( talking about average riders like myself). great low and mid range, not so great way up in high revs.
Perfect second bike for short rides in my very hilly twisty county. Longer rides are for the 11 Xc.
My son has a CBR 929 RR... I can't last 15 minutes on it, but it's freakin' WICKED.

 

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I just wish the features they gave us worked properly.

I'm now a member of TOC because of the f'n faulty "N" neutral light on the guage. Yes, yes, yes, I know, it's really my fault becuase I tried to start the bike without being on it. I get that and accept that, but damn it to hell if they are going to put the light there, make it accurate.

TOC incident: Wife and I getting ready to go on first poker run and bike parked in driveway. Waiting on her to come out so I figured I'd start the bike and let it warm up. Put it in neutral (per light), hit the start button and it lurched forward and over onto the left side. :mad:

It's also happened that at stop lights, when I know I'm going to be there awhile, I'll put it in "N" and wait. Light turns green, I shift, hear the solid clank of the tranny, "N" light goes out, let out clutch and bike sits there. Shift again and it takes hold. Again, :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I just wish the features they gave us worked properly.

I'm now a member of TOC because of the f'n faulty "N" neutral light on the guage. Yes, yes, yes, I know, it's really my fault becuase I tried to start the bike without being on it. I get that and accept that, but damn it to hell if they are going to put the light there, make it accurate.

TOC incident: Wife and I getting ready to go on first poker run and bike parked in driveway. Waiting on her to come out so I figured I'd start the bike and let it warm up. Put it in neutral (per light), hit the start button and it lurched forward and over onto the left side. :mad:

It's also happened that at stop lights, when I know I'm going to be there awhile, I'll put it in "N" and wait. Light turns green, I shift, hear the solid clank of the tranny, "N" light goes out, let out clutch and bike sits there. Shift again and it takes hold. Again, :mad:
I've had the latter happen quite a bit too. I'll have to be more conscience of starting the bike with the neutral light on i.e. I'll start it with the clutch in. Thanks for the heads up. Hope you had the tip over protection, I don't. Never had a bike that had such a thing so I didn't reckon I'd need it. Probably wrong again!
 

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I have had several incidents of the N light on while in first. No doubt it will get me sooner or later...like I need another reason to drop her. lol
 

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I've had the latter happen quite a bit too. I'll have to be more conscience of starting the bike with the neutral light on i.e. I'll start it with the clutch in. Thanks for the heads up. Hope you had the tip over protection, I don't. Never had a bike that had such a thing so I didn't reckon I'd need it. Probably wrong again!
Yep. It basically rested on the highway peg and bag protection. No damage, but played heck on my back standing it back up. Thankfully I had seen a video of a dude doing so with his back to the bike and pushing backward. Worked for me and we got to enjoy a good ride after all.
 

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I call them F.R.E.D. When FRED Works, Great. But when FRED quits........

F XXing
R diculous
E ectronic
D evice
 

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Look at the BMW S100RR... optional electronic rider aids:
$1,480 traction control and Race ABS option
$450 Gearshift Assistant (allows full-throttle upshifts without backing off the throttle/using the clutch

Base models include electronics that influence power and throttle response over four possible modes: Rain, Sport, Race and Slick. The Dynamic Traction Control/ABS option (either of which can be disabled if desired) adds to the four riding modes a few other rider aids, including varying ABS settings. Wheel-speed sensors supply info for the ABS and traction control, and a gyro mounted under the seat provides additional data to the bike's ECU to influence throttle response and to provide a measure of wheelie control.

http://www.motorcycle.com/manufacturer/bmw/2010-bmw-s1000rr-review-88974.html

What the hell... Why not a remote so you can contol the bike from the comfort of your living room and watch the ride on TV?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Look at the BMW S100RR... optional electronic rider aids:
$1,480 traction control and Race ABS option
$450 Gearshift Assistant (allows full-throttle upshifts without backing off the throttle/using the clutch

Base models include electronics that influence power and throttle response over four possible modes: Rain, Sport, Race and Slick. The Dynamic Traction Control/ABS option (either of which can be disabled if desired) adds to the four riding modes a few other rider aids, including varying ABS settings. Wheel-speed sensors supply info for the ABS and traction control, and a gyro mounted under the seat provides additional data to the bike's ECU to influence throttle response and to provide a measure of wheelie control.

http://www.motorcycle.com/manufacturer/bmw/2010-bmw-s1000rr-review-88974.html

What the hell... Why not a remote so you can contol the bike from the comfort of your living room and watch the ride on TV?
C'mon HC, you gotta admit the "allows full-throttle upshifts without backing off the throttle/using the clutch" feature is pretty damn kewl. Makes our Vic trannies feel downright agricultural.
 

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C'mon HC, you gotta admit the "allows full-throttle upshifts without backing off the throttle/using the clutch" feature is pretty damn kewl. Makes our Vic trannies feel downright agricultural.
I'm old school. Hold pressure up on the shifter and as soon as you come off full throttle it shifts and you're right back in it...like an automatic trans. Do you really think there's a measuable advantage?
 

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Until you ride a bike that needs those features or has them you wont appreciate them. Granted those feature arent needed most of the time, but when your taking your ride to the track the twisty kind lol, and are trying to wring every bit out of your bike and yourself you would be very happy to have them. Again until you need it you never know you want it, and I cant change that opinion over the internet.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'm old school. Hold pressure up on the shifter and as soon as you come off full throttle it shifts and you're right back in it...like an automatic trans. Do you really think there's a measuable advantage?
If you don't do it any better than me, then yeah. I use that technique to shift the XR into 4 thru 6, but below that it is super jerky. And not infrequently I pull up on the shifter and end up staying in the same gear.

From a practical standpoint, if done perfectly, I get that it wouldn't make a lot of difference. But given identical bikes, the guy with the speed shifter still doesn't have to get out of the throttle 5 times, even briefly.
 
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