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Discussion Starter #1
Seeking info......
I plan to do the 15K service my 2012 XR forks.
From what Kevinx posted they should be torn down and cleaned very well not just a fluid replacement.
That said, has anyone done the tear down without the Special Compression Tool?
Is there a write up on this that someone has done other than the service manual?
The only method I can find is the witchdoctor video.
Should I use his video and a procedure?
Any constructive suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
 

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I have yet to do this, but there are those on this forum who say the WD video is wrong. Don't ask me why. But why are you doing it so soon? I'm going to put on 30K before servicing the forks. Even the Service mgr. at my dealer sez to wait til then. If you are adhering to the manual, you can also put off replacing the belt until way after Ma Vic's recommendation. Merry Christmas, I hope this helps a bit.
 

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go to tech forum here there was a post about 3 weeks back with a lot of answers
 

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I have yet to do this, but there are those on this forum who say the WD video is wrong. Don't ask me why. But why are you doing it so soon? I'm going to put on 30K before servicing the forks. Even the Service mgr. at my dealer sez to wait til then. If you are adhering to the manual, you can also put off replacing the belt until way after Ma Vic's recommendation. Merry Christmas, I hope this helps a bit.
RICZ if you seen the slop that came outta my forks at 30,000 miles youd be doing it at 15,000.
replace it with Quality Synthetic oil and you can then go over 15 if you like.
Thing with suspension components they go off gradually so you dont really notice the difference till you refresh em.
then it blows you away!
yr dealers talkin ****.
Belt yeah-Ride on- mines gone waaay past rec with a hole in it!

EDIT if your riding is on stereotypical pool table smooth superhighways and endless cities like I see on tv then your shocks are not really doing much so yeah you may be ok to 30,000
 

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Good point MBX. I have @ 26K miles and am going to do the forks as a winter project. I'll report on the "slop" that comes out of mine. Also thinking of Syn oil and maybe 15W. Done that in other bikes with great results.
Is it still steenking hot there where you are? If so, I'll give you my address and you can send some of that to me. That way, you'll be cooler and I'll be warmer and drier. We're drowning here.
 

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The replacement of any lubricating fluid will depend upon the conditions it was used in and for how long. Most of us are familiar with the contributing factors that break down engine oil but so to are there conditions that promote deterioration of fork oil.

Temperature, humidity, rust, particle contamination from the sliding fork material, steel spring metal flaking, additive deterioration, etc, all contribute. Each of us ride different roads in different situations so not everyone would experience the exact same level of break down in a given time. The fork oil in my bike on the high humidity of the west coast would not last as long as the same oil in my last location on the prairies. The condition of the road and how many times it stresses the viscosity characteristics of the oil through the valves contributes as well. Nice smooth superhighways will have less of an effect than potholed back roads.

The resultant varnish that is produced by the deterioration is the reason it needs a good cleaning. Your engine would also benefit from a cleaning flush when the oil is changed but I doubt many even know about it.

Once the deterioration of the metal surfaces begins it gets worse exponentially. Unless you are taking things apart and looking microscopically you won't see some of the effects. If corrosion gets to the point you can see it with your naked eye it's too late. Don't let your oil get to the point where it's noticeable that you've left it too long.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Potential Procedure

I gleaned this from a lot of posts, feel free to add or suggest any changes. This is my attempt to make myself a procedure.

1. Remove the front calipers from the fork mounts, remove the front wheel & axle.
2. Lose the Top cap a turn or two while shock is held firm.
3. Remove shocks.
4. Remove bottom bolt and washer.
5. Set a drain pan under fork and collect the old fork oil.
6. Remove cap carefully and take out spring, cartridge etc.
7. Rinse out fork legs with cleaner. Once everything is cleaned up (spring, cartridge, etc) reassemble the fork and install allen bolt removed to drain forks.
8. Compress fork and add appropriate quantity of oil (volume & measurement per manual)(481 cc +- 3cc for an XR).
9. Compress several times trying to remove all air bubbles.
10. using a syringe tube setup, lower the fork oil level to 106mm for an XR.
11. Reinstall fork caps and reverse the removal steps to reassemble.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So....

Is this procedure not right or ???
to general? missing items?
Sure wish one of the Victory Mechanics would post comments or a corrected procedure.

I gleaned this from a lot of posts, feel free to add or suggest any changes. This is my attempt to make myself a procedure.

1. Remove the front calipers from the fork mounts, remove the front wheel & axle.
2. Lose the Top cap a turn or two while shock is held firm.
3. Remove shocks.
4. Remove bottom bolt and washer.
5. Set a drain pan under fork and collect the old fork oil.
6. Remove cap carefully and take out spring, cartridge etc.
7. Rinse out fork legs with cleaner. Once everything is cleaned up (spring, cartridge, etc) reassemble the fork and install allen bolt removed to drain forks.
8. Compress fork and add appropriate quantity of oil (volume & measurement per manual)(481 cc +- 3cc for an XR).
9. Compress several times trying to remove all air bubbles.
10. using a syringe tube setup, lower the fork oil level to 106mm for an XR.
11. Reinstall fork caps and reverse the removal steps to reassemble.
 

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The bottom allen you loosen first then loosen then top nut.
yes fender wheel and all come off. Tie caliper out of the way.

Before you put wheel on stick two fingers in wheel bearing and move side to side to see if it feels smooth. Smooth is good if it feels harsh you might need new bearings.

youtub has some videos.
 

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What does the workshop manual say?
Bbob has links to free manuals on disc.
Im not conversent with USD forks but any job is a learning curve if you havent done it before.
Forums can have lots of opinions and theories but when Im diving into unknown territory its nice to have the basics in simple language from someone whos done the job before.
Sorry I cant help on USD fork service.
 

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You'll be fine mate ..... It's a 2 man job,

Did you download and print the manual already ? That's the most important thing ...

What oil will you use ? On the link i send you it stated 15w motul if i remember correctly ...

Number 4. Must join with number 1. Coz when you release the spring then the inner workings rotate with that small bolt .... So maybe try and drain the old oil when the wheel is OUT ??

Yes we have conventional forks, you have USD forks .... Our manual's also have the HAMMER section that have USD

Let us know if you need more info ....

Ps, what will you use to clean the old oil / internals with ??

I used electro cleaning WITHOUT any resedue .... But guess breakcleaner will work also ....

EDIT ; oops sorry VJ ... Double post about loosening the small bolt before taking out the forks ...
 

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I used fresh fork oil to flush the forks clean.
Pour a bit in, pump em, pour it out.
Repeat till it comes out clean.
Two goes and mine were clean.
That way yr not gonna contaminate the new oil with a cleaning solvent.
Fork oil is cheap.
 

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Good one MbX .... Next time I'll do that too, as you know i have put the "wrong" (10W instead of 15W) weight oil as i had to pick it up in another country .... Pfffff nevertheless, next year i can just do it again, as it is an easy job now we know how to do it ....
 

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Good one MbX .... Next time I'll do that too, as you know i have put the "wrong" (10W instead of 15W) weight oil as i had to pick it up in another country .... Pfffff nevertheless, next year i can just do it again, as it is an easy job now we know how to do it ....
Not neccesarily 'wrong' BP6666VR , I used 10W the first time when I just flushed and changed the oil.
It was on RaceTech advice that with Gold Valves as well as drilling out the damper rods for increased flow and upgraded springs, that 15W be used along with the suggested preload.
A good 10W synthetic has still gotta be better that old Victory fork oil.
 

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Any constructive suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
Let a professional do it....

I'm at 26k and next spring when I pull the XC out of storage(or sooner if I get the time and more of this warm weather) I'm going to pull the rims, tires and fork tubes. then bring them to a local shop to have a new set of tires mounted/balanced and the fork service done.
I do my own maintenance, up grades, add on's and such but when it come to tires, brakes and suspension these are points I leave to a pro.
By doing the "bull work" for the shop(removing/replacing the rims and fork tubes) I'll save a ton of money.
 

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Let a professional do it....

I'm at 26k and next spring when I pull the XC out of storage(or sooner if I get the time and more of this warm weather) I'm going to pull the rims, tires and fork tubes. then bring them to a local shop to have a new set of tires mounted/balanced and the fork service done.
I do my own maintenance, up grades, add on's and such but when it come to tires, brakes and suspension these are points I leave to a pro.
By doing the "bull work" for the shop(removing/replacing the rims and fork tubes) I'll save a ton of money.
As long as you actually get what you are paying for!

My latest experience with letting a pro get the job done was when I bought our gl1500 sidecar rig this summer. Guy had just paid a bunch of money to have the forks seals replaced (conventional damper rods) when they replaced a disk rotor, brake pads, rear tire, neck bearings and the rear tire before having a sidecar and raked triple trees installed by another shop.

The labor was broken down by job and showed he had paid a sizable amount for the labor done to the front end. The jobs done were spelled out. The receipt came with the rig when I picked it up.

By the time I had driven home with the bike and sidecar the seals were leaking and what was leaking out looked like black moly based oil. I already hated the handling so I ordered springs and emulators from Racetech and put them in.

When I tore the forks down the oil looked like it had never, ever been changed.
Definitely not a year ago when the guy paid to have the seals changed. The seals weren't new either, the slider bushings had no teflon on one side and were running on the copper. Every part in that fork except the fork tubes, damper rods and lower legs went in the trash because of excess wear as did most of the anti dive parts.

Most likely instead of getting what he paid for he got his seals cleaned with a seal mate and called good.
The bike was then taken to another shop where a raked triple tree was installed.

That meant the brakes, axle, wheel and fork tubes were removed a second time.

Both shops missed that the anti dive needed to be rebuilt and was puking oil. That some of the hard parts were cracked in the anti dive mechanism even though these must be removed and handled each time the wheel is taken off or brakes removed That one of the front wheel bearings was deep into failure mode.

Both shops charge about $100 an hour for labor. It wasn't that he didn't get charged for the work. Between the two shops the bill was staggering.
Because there were two shops involved I have no idea what happened where so no names will be posted.

Bottom line is use someone you trust to actually do the work and not just charge you for it.
 

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"Professional" means only ONE thing...they charge for their work. Having had a repair biz for over 40 years, I learned that bit when I saw others' work and had to redo it. There are a lot of guys out there who are dangerous with tools in their hands. Some of the worse work I witnessed was by "factory trained" techs.
 

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I wish I had the facilities, tools and know-how to do everything on the bike myself but I don't, so I know my limits and what I'm comfortable and able too do. I haven't had to actually use a shop outside of a dealer in years, this one I'm going to as been around forever and has a good reputation. I'm confident they can handle a tire change and fork service. :wink
 
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