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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I got the parts and brake line flaring tool/kit delivered today. I set to work repairing my brake line. I first cut the line with a hacksaw at the location of the leak. I then gently bent each of the resulting two lines gently upward to allow me to work on them. I used the tubing cutter that came with the flaring kit to cut each tube back a bit. I then cleaned and prepped each tube for flaring.

Picture 1 shows the front tube ready to be flared. Picture 2 shows the rear tube after flaring. The steel tubing is painted a dark gray color and the white you see in picture 2 is where the paint has been removed by the flaring process. You can see the flare nut on this tube. If you do this repair, make sure to not forget to slide the flare nut onto the tube before you make each flare.

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Picture 3 shows the front and rear flares installed into their unions. I then carefully measured the length of splice piece I needed - taking into account the distance that flaring decreased a tube's length (~1.5 mm) and the space taken by the "guts" of each union (~3.2 mm). Accurate measuring was necessary as there is surprisingly little movement available in these tubes. Picture 4 shows the splice piece I created in between its attachment locations.
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I inserted the splice piece and tightened everything up. This is shown in picture 5.
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I then bled the brakes which took a long time because all I did was pump the lever and let little air bubbles come out into the reservoir. I did not use my speed bleeders or a vacuum bleeding method. I monitored the new unions and there were no leaks even once I built up pressure.

Tomorrow I will finish the project, cut the "corners" off the offending backrest mounting bracket, and put everything back together. I will take more pictures to continue documenting this process.

I will say that the brake line flaring had me worried. I had never done this before. I ordered a cheap (~$22) flaring kit from Amazon and it worked great. I did follow the prep instructions from some youtube videos which recommended beveling the outside lip of each tube end where it would be flared and doing the flaring using brake fluid as a lubricant. Also note that I created what are called "double flares" at each point where the tubing ended and was inserted into a union. According to all that I read, double flares are what is needed to withstand the pressure in a brake system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Finishing this saga (hopefully). Today, I put everything back together. I was worried about the newly installed unions/nuts rubbing on the stock brake lines so I wrapped each in protective foam padding covered by a flexible but tough plastic. I secured these with cable ties. This is shown in picture 1.
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I then installed the fender. As you can see in picture 2, my plan to located the unions/nuts between or to the side of the fender crossbraces worked well.
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I felt that the Victory brand riders backrest bracket stuck out too far so I sawed off about 1/4-3/8 inch of each "corner" of this bracket. I also raised this bracket by putting two large washers under it. This raised it about 1/4 inch. You can see this backrest bracket in picture 3. It no longer interferes or touches the wiring loom on the right side of the bike top part of this picture but actually out of frame or the brake lines at the bottom of the picture.
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I did not have time to strip the bubbled paint off of the fender crossbrace but I plan to do this next summer. I put this bike into storage for the winter in about 3 week when I go south for 6 months. My plan is to strip off any damaged or loose paint on the crossbrace and just spray paint it with a primer. I will mask off the visible parts of the fender. I do not plan to do anything to the damaged paint on the frame since the frame is aluminum and should not undergo corrosion.

I have two bottom-line messages to anyone reading this thread.

1) Do not be afraid to mess with brake lines and brake line flaring tools. They are really not at all hard to use.

2) Anyone with a Victory brand riders backrest should remove the seat and check to see if the "corners" of the mounting bracket for this backrest are damaging the wires in the wire loom or the metal brake lines.
 

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Did you clean off the brake fluid?
I'd be concerned with it creeping along fender under the paint while you are away and causing much more damage.

Washers under the bracket take care of the issue but I will agree the points are an unnecessary design feature. The grab handle had the same on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
IndyX, What do you mean by "The grab handle had the same on it."? My grab handles are on the sides of the fender and attach to the inside of the saddle bag support rails.
 

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IndyX, What do you mean by "The grab handle had the same on it."? My grab handles are on the sides of the fender and attach to the inside of the saddle bag support rails.
Passenger grab strap thing. It's on the backrest bracket too for some reason. Bike left factory with the bracket with only the strap. Base is same shape on both.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Ahhh, sorry. I did not equate "grab handle" with "grab strap" and was too narrowly focused on the rigid chrome handles on the side of my bike.
 

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I think there are some liability laws floating around that mandate some kind of passenger handhold if no backrest - hence, that strap can come up thru the seat opening.

But if you don't actually use the bracket for a driver backrest, then you could leave the bracket off. Some plastic P-clips could keep the lines safely in place.
 

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I know the law exists somewhere but it's a bit silly to have the strap with the trunk. I cut it off the backrest bracket. 🤷‍♂️

Vinish let us know how it performs and if any issues reoccur. Looks like a good repair. :)
 
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